Anorak

Anorak | Wikileaks And Madeleine McCann: Spinning A Story From A Thin Cable

Wikileaks And Madeleine McCann: Spinning A Story From A Thin Cable

by | 14th, December 2010

MADELEINE McCann is back on the front pages. The missing child is on the front page of the Guardian. Having encouraged readers to suggest which search terms would be useful to browse the Wiikleaks cables for, the Guardian settled on Our Maddie keywords.

Can it create a story from the cables? Well, it tries to. The paper duly leads with:

“UK police ‘developed’ case against McCanns”

The cables are those of Britain’s ambassador to Portugal, Alexander Wykeham Ellis. On September 21, 2007 two weeks after Portuguese police named Gerry and Kate McCann as arguidos he commented on the happening in a memo to Washington, US Ambassador Al Hoffman. He wrote:

“Madeleine McCann’s disappearance in the south of Portugal in May 2007 has generated international media attention with controversy surrounding the Portuguese-led police investigation and the actions of Madeleine’s parents.”

Well, yes. He goes on to talk of the media frenzy and that British police had developed the current evidence against the McCann parents. The Guardian’s sensational is that the British and Portuguese police were working together. What?! Britain oldest ally was working with the British authorities to try and solve the case of British subject missing overseas? Who knew?!

The US ambassador adds:

Without delving into the details of the case, Ellis admitted that the British police had developed the current evidence against the McCann parents, and he stressed that authorities from both countries were working co-operatively.”

The Guardian says the message is marked “confidential ”. This makes it sound important. But not all secrets are . This one isn’t. But, still, it’s

You have already read 1 premium article for free today
Access immediately the premium content with Multipass

Or come back tomorrow



Posted: 14th, December 2010 | In: Key Posts, Madeleine McCann Comments (3) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink