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Anorak | Teenager Sophie Howard Died On The Day Of The Teacher’ Strike: Who’s To Blame?

Teenager Sophie Howard Died On The Day Of The Teacher’ Strike: Who’s To Blame?

by | 1st, July 2011

ON the day of the teachers’ strike, 13-year-old Sophie Howard, of Yaxley, Peterborough, died. A branch fell on her.

Miss Howard was a student at Sawtry Community College, Cambridgeshire. She wasn’t at school on the day of her death because the school was shut for industrial action.

The Mail nots the words of one angry parent on twitter.

“she should have been safe at school, she was just sat on a bench talking with friends….it could have been my daughter.”

We have no idea who this alleged angry parent is, just that words have been written. The Mail is keen to push the idea that a freak accient could have befallen anyone and thanks to schools being shut, it could have befallen your child, or a teacher.

The BBC makes no mention of the strike in its report. It just says that Howard was killed by a 15ft falling tree branch “. The Mail says it was a 1ft-thick branch.

The Times makes the link between her death and the strike overt:

A 13-year-old girl has died after she was hit by a falling branch while relaxing in a park because her school had been closed by yesterday’s strike.

The Mirror also mentions the strike. It is aware of the possible link between the strike and the girl’s death. But it ends the article by telling its readers:

A statement on the school’s website by principal James Stewart told parents that the closure was unavoidable.

He added: “Regrettably, this means that you will need to make alternative arrangements for your children.”

Are we to make another link and blame the coalition government for the death of Sophie Howard? Are the Mirror and the Mail

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Posted: 1st, July 2011 | In: Key Posts, News Comments (7) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink