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Anorak | Princess Diana’s ‘Murder’ Letter Is Beyond The Grave

Princess Diana’s ‘Murder’ Letter Is Beyond The Grave

by | 22nd, July 2011

PRINCESS Diana is back! On the cover of the Daily Express a smiling Di illustrates the headline:

“DIANA POLICE FACE ARREST”

This must be good news for the non-seatbelt wearing celebrity princess, now residing on the fabled Sixth Floor of London’s Harvey Nichol’s department store, because, as we say, she is happy of expression.

The Express uses Diana as a barometer of its news on her. Bad news and Diana looks demure and down. Interesting news and Diana looks to the left. News on her sons and Diana looks to the heavens. Good news and she beams like the sun.

Says the Express :

TWO of Britain’s leading former police officers are wanted for questioning over allegations that they withheld crucial evidence about the car crash which killed Princess Diana.

A French judge wants to ask ex-Yard chief Lord Condon and Sir David Veness why they failed to disclose the existence of a note in which she predicted her assassination.

But what of that front-page headline making arrest? Well, there aren’t any. But there is that letter the note taken by Diana’s lawyer Lord Mishcon. The Express reports that it says:

“Efforts would be made if not to get rid of her (be it by some accident in her car, such as a pre-prepared brake failure or whatever)…at least to see that she was so injured or damaged as to be declared unbalanced.”

What the note says in full is:

“The Queen would abdicate by the next April, she (Diana) would be involved in a car accident which would at the very least render her so ‘injured or damaged as to be declared unbalanced,’ there was a conspiracy to put aside the Princess and the then Camilla Parker Bowles and royal nanny Tiggy Legge Bourke had had an abortion and she (Diana) would shortly have a document to prove it.”

Says the Express :

It was more than three years later before it emerged that the officers had locked the note in Lord Condon’s safe at Scotland Yard. When Lord Condon stood down as the Metropolitan Police Commissioner his successor as Met Commissioner, Lord Stevens, continued to keep its existence a secret.

Under French law, “removing or concealing” evidence, which could “facilitate the discovery of a crime”, is punishable by three to five years in jail or a fine…

The explosive development means that the issue of whether the fatal crash in the Pont de l’Alma tunnel in Paris was an accident or murder is likely to be once more the subject of a controversial court case.

An unnamed source tells us:

“The French courts will not allow this matter to rest and it is understood that if Lord Condon and Sir David refuse to attend Paris for an interview then Judge Caddeo will not hesitate to issue international warrants of arrest.”

Says Lord Condon:

“I have not been asked to go to Paris. There was discussion of all these things at the inquest and if there is anything else, you will have to speak to the legal affairs department at Scotland Yard. This is not the time or place for this.”

And then this:

The note would have made it more likely that the French would have opened a murder inquiry.

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Posted: 22nd, July 2011 | In: Royal Family Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink