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Anorak | Eternal Copyright: Adrian Hon’s argument is for his use only

Eternal Copyright: Adrian Hon’s argument is for his use only

by | 20th, February 2012

WHO’s for eternal copyright? Adrian Hon writes in the Telegraph :

On Tuesday 14th, the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) posted a message on RnBXclusive.com, stating: “If you have downloaded music using this website you may have committed a criminal offence which carries a maximum penalty of up to 10 years imprisonment and an unlimited fine under UK law.”

SOCA’s threat is a stirring defence of what we hold dear in this country – the right of a creator to benefit from their intellectual property, whether it be a song, book, film, or game. Without this assurance of compensation, we might not see any new creative works being produced at all, and so it’s for this reason that we’ve continually lengthened copyright terms from 14-28 years as set out by the Statue of Anne in 1710 to “lifetime plus 70 years” today.

Do we create only for “compensation”? Isn’t sharing an idea a joy? Isn;t sharing how the Bible works and religious texts?

Yet now, as we’ve instituted decade-long jail terms and unlimited fines for copyright infringers, it’s time to take the next step in extending copyright terms even further.
Imagine you’re a new parent at 30 years old and you’ve just published a bestselling new novel. Under the current system, if you lived to 70 years old and your descendants all had children at the age of 30, the copyright in your book and thus the proceeds would provide for your children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and great-great-grandchildren.

What if the descendants were grasping tossers who bastardised your work for cash and spend it on projects that would have been abhorrent to the creator?

But what, I ask, about your great-great-great-grandchildren? What do they get? How can our laws be so heartless as to deny them the benefit of your hard work in the name of some do-gooding concept as the “public good”, simply because they were born a mere century and a half after the book was written? After all, when you wrote your book, it sprung from your mind fully-formed, without requiring any inspiration from other creative works – you owe nothing at all to the public. And what would the public do with your book, even if they had it? Most likely, they’d just make it worse.

Thankfully, Hon’s irony is shining through.

We must move to Eternal Copyright a system where copyright never expires, and a world in which we no longer snatch food out of the mouths of our creators’ descendants. With eternal copyright, the knowledge that our great-great-great-grandchildren and beyond will benefit financially from our efforts will no doubt spur us on to achieve greater creative heights than ever seen before…

A bold idea such as Eternal Copyright will inevitably have opponents who wish to stand in the way of progress. Some will claim that because

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Posted: 20th, February 2012 | In: Technology Comment (1) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink