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Anorak | Rio Ferdinand calls Ashley Cole a ‘choc ice’ – Liverpool’s Milky Bar Kid Kelly models on

Rio Ferdinand calls Ashley Cole a ‘choc ice’ – Liverpool’s Milky Bar Kid Kelly models on

by | 15th, July 2012

CHELSEA captain John Terry did not racially abuse QPR defender Anton Ferdinand. Now, Ferdinand’s big brother, Manchester United star Rio Ferdinand has called Terry’s colleague a “Choc ice”. A choc ice is someone black on the outside but white on the middle. It is not a term of praise.

On twitter a @CarltonEbanks, opined: “Looks like Ashley Cole’s going to be their choc ice. Then again he’s always been a sellout. Shame on him.”

Rio Ferdinand responded: “I hear you fella! Choc ice is classic hahahahahahha!!”

He then adds: “I’m more a cherry brandy man! Used to go for the twisters too back in the day! Classics.”

Followed by: “Its Sarcasm!”

As we know, sarcasm can be misconstrued as racism.

Cole’s agent Graham Shear tells one and all that his client “wishes to make it clear that he and Rio are good friends and Ashley has no intention of making any sort of complaint…Ashley appreciates tweeting is so quick it often results in offhand and stray comments.”

Terry, 31, was accused of calling Anton Ferdinand a “fucking black cunt” during a Premier League game last October. Cole told magistrates the Chelsea skipper was innocent. Terry said he said the words but their tone was sarcastic.

Ebanks explains:

“It was not a racist comment. How could it be when I am a mixed race man? My partner is white and our children are mixed race. The term is meant to mean someone who is not true, someone who’s being false to help somebody close to them. It has nothing to do with being black on the outside and white on the inside…Rio Ferdinand used the same term because he would understand it in the same way I would.”

What this battle of idiots needs is a prime pillock to circus master them. Step forward Labour MP Keith Vaz, chairman of the Commons Home Affairs Select Committee. Says he: “Everyone should cool down. We need to draw a line under this particular incident.These footballers are role models.”

Role models? For whom?

Rio Ferdinand has been smarting ever since he was left out of Roy Hodgson’s Euro 2012 England team. John Terry was in. The brouhaha meant that, to some, Hodgson had picked an alleged racist over a victim’s brother. Rio Ferdinand was the proxy victim.

A “source close to Ferdinand” told the Guardian that the player felt Hodgson’s decision was “disgraceful and morally very suspect”.

Kick It Out, English football’s leading anti-racism organisation, were upset:

“The most likely conclusion is that it will express its feelings at the end of the tournament, when it will make it clear it believes Ferdinand has lost out through internal politics and that it was morally wrong for him to be excluded if, as strongly suspected by some, it is because Terry is charged with allegedly racially abusing Anton Ferdinand during Chelsea’s game at Queens Park Rangers in October.

Only all this overlooked the glaring fact that when Gary Cahill was ruled of the tournament with a broken jaw his place went to a player on the standby list. Rio Ferdinand was not on it.

The anti-racists slighted Hodgson. Football, they demanded, should play second fiddle to the biggest show in town: the chance to show the world how enlightened England is. Football is more about anti-racism than it is about winning a sporting match. When Vaz calls a mixed-race player like Ferdinand a role mode he means it not as a comment on his abilities with a ball, a spark to the boys who dream of glory in the park, rather as a beacon of light to the racists. His on-message thinking is that if Ferdinand does not play for England than the racist have won.

The great pity, accruing to Vaz and others, is that Martin Kelly, the Liverpool defender who replaced Cahill, was young and white. Or a Milky Bar Kid, as Rio and his enlightened pals might call him…



Posted: 15th, July 2012 | In: Key Posts, Sports Comments (19) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink