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Anorak | Jimmy Savile: What they said when he died

Jimmy Savile: What they said when he died

by | 25th, October 2012

JIMMY Savile tributes. Now look at them.

BEFORE

Radio 1 DJ Tony Blackburn : “He was just a complete one-off. I think he was a bit of a lonely character as well. In the privacy of his own life I don’t think he had very many friends. I’ve never known anyone quite like him. He was a blunt speaking northerner, but also kind and very respectful.”

Prince Charles : “The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall are saddened to hear of Jimmy Savile’s death and their thoughts are with his family at this time.”

Alan Franey, former Chief Executive of Broadmoor Hospital : “I spent a lot of time with him and would say I knew him probably as well as anybody else knew him…I spoke to him last Wednesday and asked him how he was, and he said he was feeling very tired and short of breath. Mentally, he was very alert. But he said to me: ‘I’m coming to the end of the tunnel’…He spent a lot of his life involved in raising [money for] charity and was passionate about helping people. Jimmy had a very normal upbringing but it was a tough upbringing and he never forgot his roots. He felt that he was in a situation where he could raise funds for people using his position in showbiz and he successfully did that.”

David Hamilton, DJ : “We were together at Radio 1 in the ’70s and the station was full of eccentric personalities, but he was certainly the most flamboyant of all.One of the essential things about Jimmy was that he was a man of the people. He knew his audience, he was very much in touch with his audience. I think the public were his family. Probably of all the DJs I worked with, I knew him less than any of the others. He kept himself very much to himself. He didn’t drink so he wasn’t the sort of man who would go down to the pub and have a bevvy with you.”

Paul Bruce, who appeared on Jim’ll Fix It : “It was every child’s dream to get on that programme. It was fantastic to meet the guy and go on the programme, and I had 15-17 million people watching me on a Saturday evening. He was a great guy.”

Catholic Herald: “I love that remark to a Broadmoor patient: “what do you want to go round strangling crumpet for?”; there’s a touch of genius in that also a reflection of the invulnerability of the truly innocent man, so much and so obviously on the side of everyone he talked to that he could only stay safe in any company.”

Graham Smith from Harrogate, Yorkshire, neighbour and colleague : “I lived in the apartment directly below Sir Jimmy for a few years and worked as a documentary cameraman on Jim’ll Fix It. I got to know him quite well as neighbours as well as professionally. I also worked with Sir Jim on a video for Leeds General Infirmary. I was always impressed with the way he was around the hospital. He would chat with everyone and spend time with everyone. He was never too busy, he really liked people and he was happy to spend time with them. “Margaret Thatcher asked him to look after the wives of the G7 leaders during a conference. He took them to Stoke Mandeville. They were confronted by a man in tracksuit and a jewellery but by the end of the day, they were eating out of his hand.”

Mark Thompson, BBC director general: “I am very sad to hear of Sir Jimmy Savile’s death. From Top of the Pops to Jim’ll Fix It, Jimmy’s unique style entertained generations of BBC audiences. Like millions of viewers and listeners we shall miss him greatly.”

Jeremy Hunt, Culture Secretary : “Sir Jimmy Savile was one of broadcasting’s most unique and colourful characters. From Top of the Pops to making children’s dreams come true on Jim’ll Fix It, a generation of people will remember his catchphrases and sense of fun. But his lasting legacy will be the millions he raised for charity, tirelessly giving up his time and energy to help those causes he was passionate about.”

Dave Lee Travis:  “Deep down inside him there was a guy which was very hard to get to. I’ve known Jimmy Savile for over 50 years, that’s a hell of a long period to know somebody, and I’ve never had an absolutely in-depth straight conversation with him because he’s constantly got a sort of invisible shield up. He likes to keep his distance from everybody, even friends. He’ll joke his way out of something if he doesn’t want to answer you… I think probably enigma is a good word for it.”

Charles Kennedy MP : Sir Jimmy was “a true and long-standing friend to the West Highlands over decades of diligence and decency”.

Marie Jackson, Wolverhampton : “As a kid, I wrote in everywhere: Blue Peter, Jim’ll Fix it and all the local radio stations. I was also quite unusual as I played the bagpipes

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Posted: 25th, October 2012 | In: Celebrities Comments (5) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink