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Anorak | How to drug test child athletes

How to drug test child athletes

by | 19th, March 2013

athletes urine

THE Daily Record reports that 10-year-olds keen to jon athletics clubs are being dope tested. Oh, for that Olympics Legacy. And moroever:

The kids can be made to give urine samples in front of adult observers at junior events… If asked to give a sample at a competition, a child is taken to a testing station where they have to urinate in a flask in front of a UK Anti-Doping official. The child can have a representative with them. A second official is also present.

Sounds like Jimmy Savile’s Marthonettes will run again.

A parent is quoted:

 “My son is 10. He isn’t an elite athlete. It seems crazy that he could be dragged into some tent while away at a fun sports event and be told to pee in a bottle in front of two adults that he doesn’t know.  I think it is reasonable for parents to be worried about who these people are. Even if everything is completely above board, it is still going to be a pretty intimidating and uncomfortable thing for children who are ultimately just taking part in a fun sports day.”

The odds on being asked to wee in front of a few adults seems slim. For one thing: mess. Can three adults and the child fit into the cubicle in the ladies? For another thing: time. See the young lads told to wee freely by the men with clipboards, his bladder full with fizzy pop and isotonic treats but unable to go.

But they will try. The Sport and Recreation Alliance writes:

UK Anti-Doping’s role is to test Athletes for the use of Prohibited Substances and Methods. Doping as a practice may be conducted by all Athletes regardless of age, ethnicity or social background. In some instances the use of a prohibited substance by a Child may constitute a form of abuse by another adult or individual. DCOs and Chaperones are trained to collect Samples from Athletes selected  for Doping Control on behalf of UK Anti-Doping. Therefore there is a duty of care to protect Children, vulnerable adults, DCOs, BCOs and Chaperones,  throughout the Testing Process. The testing procedures (and their permitted modifications) are designed to ensure that the Athlete, parents, and Athlete Support Personnel have confidence in the integrity of the Testing Process and protection of Children.  DCOs and Chaperones accompany selected Athletes throughout the whole Testing Process from notification to the completion of the administration for the test. The actual Sample provision by the Athlete must be directly observed by the DCO in a secure and private facility. Selected Athletes must remove adequate clothing from their body to ensure that the DCO has a  direct, unobstructed view of the genital area while urine is passed (in order to ensure there is no tampering with or manipulation of the Sample). There is no requirement for DCOs and Chaperones to physically touch any Athlete during the Testing Process, their role is explanation.

On your marks… Get set…. Go!



Posted: 19th, March 2013 | In: Sports Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink