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Anorak | The story of the Mau Mau uprising and the battle for compensation from their British torturers

The story of the Mau Mau uprising and the battle for compensation from their British torturers

by | 6th, June 2013

THE British Government will pay Mau Mau £19.9m compensation to Kenyans tortured by their colonial rulers during the the Mau Mau uprising in the 1950s. Yep. That’s all they get. All 5,200 survivors of 100,000 Kenyans imprisoned in British-run camps. These survivors are, of course, all old. They got to live with the memories of British Government-sanctioned rape, castration and torture. They deserve more. Much more. They deserve justice. Who ordered the torture? Who got away with barbarity? This is their story in photos (some are not easy viewing):

The BBC:

In 1951, Jomo Kenyatta was arrested and imprisoned by the British for being a leading light in the Mau Mau movement. With his detention Mau Mau expanded.

In October 1952, the British declared a state of emergency, which continued until 1960. The State of Emergency was in response to an increase in attacks on the property and persons of white settlers, as well as African chiefs who were seen as collaborators.

There was also an increase in oath taking. This was a ceremony, affirming loyalty to the Mau Mau cause and war against the Europeans. About 2,000 Kikuyu were killed by Mau Mau fighters for refusing to take the oath.

 

 



Posted: 6th, June 2013 | In: News Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink