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Princess Diana murdered by a mentally ill SAS fantasist

by | 30th, August 2013

Police services prepare to take away the car in which Diana, Princess of Wales, died in a car crash that also killed her boyfriend, Dodi Fayed, and the chauffeur. The crash happened shortly after midnight in a tunnel along the Seine River at the Pont de l Alma bridge, while paparazzi on motorcycles were following her car.

THE silly season was punctuated by the return of Princess Diana. News was that someone in or close to the SAS murdered Di. So said “Soldier N”. The story was broken by Channel 4, which noted:

“The allegations, if true, ask some serious questions  of Soldier N’s mental state of health”

Soldier N’s shocker was first made in a letter written in 2011 by his in-laws. This note was part of the second court martial against one of N’s colleagues’s, namely sniper Sgt Danny Nightingale who was found with a stack of ammo and a Glock pistol in his possession – souvenirs of overseas ops. N was testifying against Nightingale.

Channel 4 added:

In the letter, the parents-in-law of Soldier N begged the commanding officer of the SAS to intervene as Soldier N was allegedly threatening to kill them and intimidate their daughter.

The parents-in-law also wrote about the circumstances surrounding Princess Diana’s death, saying: “He also told her [the daughter] that it was the XXX who arranged Princess Diana’s death and that has been covered up. So what chance do my daughter and I stand against his threats?”

images (5)N was one of the prosecutions’s key witnesses. Some shock, then, to hear of SAS soldiers giving testimony against one another, especially when we lean that N had been caught and jailed for keeping a Glock pistol, a grenade and ammunition at his home.

The author of the letter also writes how Soldier N had threatened their daughter saying he could make her “disappear” and warned her of the existence of a box that some of the members of the SAS used for “private jobs”. The letter states: “They put in the box the name, address and details of what they want done and then one of them who wants to earn extra money takes the details out of the box and does that job.”

They then ask the commanding officer if the names and contact details of their family are in the box.

The seven-page hand-written letter also makes reference to another member of the SAS who allegedly shot his wife and family. It states: “He reminded my daughter of a man… who had matrimonial trouble and he went home and shot her and the family.”

The parents-in-law add:

“We have said for sometime that this man is not presenting with normal behaviour and yet we were told he is fine. No doubt he is good at his job but he can’t switch off and he brings the job home and treats us all very badly. There are times when we have been petrified… You have trained him and as such I feel that the army should step in and take some responsibility here.”

This is an incredible story. Can it be that the SAS are not as secret as we have been led to believe? That mental health is an issue ignored? That soldiers routinely have guns in the home?

In 1987, the Daily Mirror reported on Frances Nicholson, who’d been married to SAS celebrity Andy McNab::

If you saw a young woman wearing shades in Hereford, it didn’t always mean the sun was shining.

It meant the SAS were back at the regimental base. And their wives and girlfriends were anxious to hide the bruises and black eyes caused by their men – who sometimes turned violent when they came home from dangerous missions.

For other women, the scars were mental ones. They ended up in the psychiatric wing at Hereford County Hospital. Frances Nicholson says: “A nurse told me at least 10 wives and ex-wives a year landed up there. Some of them needed treatment under sedation for weeks.”

But never mind that story. Get a load of the news that the SAS killed Di (says one highly questionable source)…

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Posted: 30th, August 2013 | In: Reviews, Royal Family Comments (3) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink