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Anorak | Full-kit wa*ker Jeremy Browne avoids Google cameras by wearing full veil in public

Full-kit wa*ker Jeremy Browne avoids Google cameras by wearing full veil in public

by | 18th, September 2013

brown google jeremy

JEREMY Browne MP, minister for crime prevention at the Home Office, has been captured by Google Street View walking along a street in Paddington. He calls it unnerving “.  The Liberal Democrat MP for Taunton Deane, is not emerging from a massage parlour nor  eating a kebab and smoking. He is suited, booted and holding his bright red ministerial box. He is the political equivalent of the Full Kit Wan**r, a title used to explain a grown man who is happy to be seen striding around in public wearing a full football kit; shirt, shorts, socks, even shinnies the whole kit and caboodle. Professional footballers have been FKWs too, notably a former Spurs and Manchester United player who used to wear his full England tracksuit to walk around parts of urbanised Essex.

Says Browne of the bright red box:

“I think there is an issue about the intrusiveness of modern technology,” he said. “It is why the government is right to be alert to the public concern about excessive use of CCTV. We need to get the balance right with using technology to prevent crime and people not feeling that every time they enter a public space their movements will be potentially permanently recorded.”

“Campaigners are always most alert to the threats to individual liberties that can be caused by the state. But we also need to be guarded about how the evolution of technology means that private organisations can also intrude into individual privacy in a way that many people would find unsettling. Quite often the state is more regulated than private organisations.”

What about when the Government works in cahoots with Google and other big internet firms to spy on us?

Al nonsense, of course. You can no more stop Google taking photos in the street than you can prevent anyone with a camera snapping away. Unless in the pursuit of freedom, that’s what Browne wants, to prevent anyone from taking a picture of what they like?

In 2009, the Indy reported:

Chief Constable Andy Trotter, chairman of Acpo’s media advisory group, took the decision to send the warning after growing criticism of the police’s treatment of photographers.
Writing in today’s Independent, he says: “Everyone… has a right to take photographs and film in public places. Taking photographs… is not normally cause for suspicion and there are no powers prohibiting the taking of photographs, film or digital images in a public place.”

He added: “We need to make sure that our officers and Police Community Support Officers [PCSOs] are not unnecessarily targeting photographers just because they are going about their business. The last thing in the world we want to do is give photographers a hard time or alienate the public. We need the public to help us.

“Photographers should be left alone to get on with what they are doing. If an officer is suspicious of them for some reason they can just go up to them and have a chat with them – use old-fashioned policing skills to be frank – rather than using these powers, which we don’t want to over-use at all.”

Section 44 of the Terrorism Act allows the police to stop and search anyone they want, without need for suspicion, in a designated area. The exact locations of many of these areas are kept secret from the public, but are thought to include every railway station in and well-known tourist landmarks thought to be at risk of terrorist attacks..

One photographer wrote of his experience:

As soon as I had taken a shot, PC Smith (40144) came out from

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Posted: 18th, September 2013 | In: News, Politicians, Technology Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink