Anorak

Anorak | Cake, Tea And Something Bitter: Bedfordshire Pub Joins And Illustrious List Of Rude Landlords

Cake, Tea And Something Bitter: Bedfordshire Pub Joins And Illustrious List Of Rude Landlords

by | 8th, October 2014

nailed

 

ANORAK has a soft spot for miserable landlord of cafe owner upset by the state of their clientele.

Bedfordshire pub the Black Lion in Leighton Buzzard has  put up a sign offering to nail people’s unruly children to their table. It suggests staff would “happily nail it [your child] to your table… to avoid accident or injury” to the child.

The pub’s manager, Nikki Brodin, said she did not want screaming children running round. The pub  encourages customers to talk to each other over board games.

Said Brodin:

“We certainly didn’t want to ban kids, we just believe in traditional values. It’s just a bit of fun. It’s not to offend anybody – we have children ourselves.”

That’s the little Brodins sitting smartly at table playing Cribbage. No iPad perched on the Cath Kitson tablecloth. No twitchy legs. They can sit for hours wihout moving. Years, even.

Regular readers will recall  Nice’s  Petite Syrah  café, which offered customers the chance to get a discount on their coffee.  Asking for a “a coffee” will set you back €7. But “a coffee please” is €4.25.   “Hello, a coffee please”  is a bargain €1.40.

Of course, this being France, anyone speaking in an English accent will be ignored. But why does the Petite Syrah stop there? Why not extend the offers to all manner of manners?

In 2007, Brighton’s Tea Cosy instituted a set of rules. Then owner David Daly forbade anyone from resting their elbows on the table, insulting the Queen, handling sugar cubes and sipping from teaspoons, which must never be allowed to chink against the cup. Said Mr Daly: “I am just keen to teach people of the joys of a civilised cup of tea. People have to obey the rules in my tea rooms and if not they are asked to leave.”

The wonder is that anyone should know that and want to go in. One rule states: “Hold the saucer under your cup while you sip your tea (lest you should spill or dribble).”

Those of a vintage will recognise the

You have already read 1 premium article for free today
Access immediately the premium content with Multipass

Or come back tomorrow



Posted: 8th, October 2014 | In: Key Posts, News Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink