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Anorak | Britain learns to love the Kurds as the ISIS cannibals makes a mother eat her son

Britain learns to love the Kurds as the ISIS cannibals makes a mother eat her son

by | 2nd, March 2015

For those of you still unconvinced that Islamic State is policed by depraved, murderous nutjobs comes news that jihadis fed a Kurdish fighter to his mother. The Sun leads with the news:

 

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We meet Yasir Abdulla, 36, who has left his home in Yorkshire to fight for a Kurdish homeland. Says he:

“I hate IS because of what happened to an old Kurdish woman from a nearby tribe. Her son was captured by IS fighters and taken as a prisoner to Mosul. She was determined to find her son and went to IS headquarters and asked to see him. The IS men told her to sit down because she had travelled a long way and said she should have some food before they took her to meet her son. They brought her cups of tea and fed her a meal of cooked meat, rice and soup. She thought they were kind. But they had killed him and chopped him up and after she finished the meal and asked to see her son they laughed and said, ‘You’ve just eaten him’.”

And, as ever, we hear the news that the killers do not represent Islam:

“All the tribes are united against IS. They burn people alive, they chop off people’s heads, there is no limit to their depravity. They are not Muslims, they have hijacked Islam. All they do is hate.”

He’s right. It’s tribal. It is Islam. It is nationalistic. It is far more complex than simply being a Muslim problem.

But what of the story of the poor woman who ate her son? It just ends. We want to know what happened to the mother forced into cannibalism. We want to know who did it.  We want to know if it is true. Of course, it sounds like it could be.

And what of the kurds, now called “brave” and noble, who are alone defending the West from barbarism, who with the other indigenous peoples of the area (and, yep, let’s include the Jews ) are countering the notion that all of the Middle East is exclusively Arab land?

Why didn’t they have their own state, already?

In the early 20th Century, many Kurds began to consider the creation of a homeland generally referred to as “Kurdistan”. After World War One and the defeat of the Ottoman Empire, the victorious Western allies made provision for a Kurdish state in the 1920 Treaty of Sevres.

Such hopes were dashed three years later, however, when the Treaty of Lausanne, which set the boundaries of modern Turkey, made no provision for a Kurdish state and left Kurds with minority status in their respective countries. Over the next 80 years, any move by Kurds to set up an independent state was brutally quashed.

Who signed the Treaty of Lausanne (1923), the final treaty concluding World War I. Well, Turkey, Britain, France, Italy, Japan, Greece, Romania, and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (Yugoslavia).

In 2010, the BBC wrote:

Could Turkish and Kurdish gangs become new ‘mafia’?

The Britsh Kurdish community is focused on Hackney and Harringey, London. The Kurds fled persecution in Turkey, Iraq and Iran, arriving in large numbers in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

The Museum of London reports:

The Kurdish minority has frequently suffered oppression, for example in Turkey speaking Kurdish was banned from the 1920s.

A few Iraqi Kurds arrived in Britain after the 1958 coup in Iraq when the nationalist Ba’ath party seized power.

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Posted: 2nd, March 2015 | In: News Comment (1) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink