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Anorak | Westminster paedophiles: The MI5 protested top Tory Peter Morrison

Westminster paedophiles: The MI5 protested top Tory Peter Morrison

by | 24th, July 2015

British Conservative politician and MP for Chester, Peter Morrison (1944 - 1995) at the wheel of a car, 22nd April 1976. (Photo by Evening Standard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)Yesterday we revisited the links between Westminster politicians, MI5 and the scandal of child abuse at the Kincora home.

Today the Times tells readers:

The Westminster politican protected by MI5 when suspected of child abuse was the Conservative MP Peter Morrison, who became one of Margaret Thatcher’s aides…

Morrison died on 13 July 1995. He is unlikely to mount a decent defence.

In 2002, Simon Heffer said of him:

Sir Peter Morrison, was a constant trial to the whips, who were afraid that his late-night cruises around and skirmishes in Sussex Gardens would come to the attention of the press.

In 2012, the Mail reported:

Rod Richards, a former Conservative MP and ex-leader of the Welsh Tories, made the shocking allegation that he had seen evidence linking Sir Peter Morrison to the North Wales children’s homes case, in which up to 650 children in 40 homes were sexually, physically and emotionally abused over 20 years.

Mr Richards also linked a second leading Tory grandee – now dead – to the scandals at homes including Bryn Estyn and Bryn Alyn Hall, both near Wrexham.

He said official documents had identified the pair as frequent, unexplained visitors to the care homes.
Mr Richards – who helped establish the inquiry that unearthed the scale of the abuse – said bluntly: ‘What I do know is that Morrison was a paedophile. And the reason I know that is because of the North Wales child abuse scandal.’

You can read more of the horror and murder in North Wales here.

 

English actor Robert Morley (1908 - 1992, left) with British Conservative politician and MP for Chester, Peter Morrison (1944 - 1995) outside the House of Commons, London, 23rd October 1979. (Photo by Colin Davey/Evening Standard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

English actor Robert Morley (1908 – 1992, left) with British Conservative politician and MP for Chester, Peter Morrison (1944 – 1995) outside the House of Commons, London, 23rd October 1979. (Photo by Colin Davey/Evening Standard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

 

Today the Times says sources claimed Morrison had “a penchant for small boys”.

The paper says MI5 did question Morrison, the Conservative MP for Chester and deputy chairman of the party. Papers found in Westminster reveal that Sir Antony Duff, head of the Security Service, to Sir Robert Armstrong, the cabinet secretary, said Morrison was not a big deal.

Duff died in 200o. His obituary in The Guardian called him “the epitome of the wise public servant on whom Whitehall’s ship of state has traditionally relied”.

Armstrong lives. He was Cabinet Secretary during the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major and Tony Blair.

Now age 88, he tells the Times:

“My official business was the protection of national security. I have to stress that there was nothing like evidence in this case. There was just a shadow of a rumour. It’s impossible to take investigative action on shadows of rumours.”

These days you accept rumour as fact and beat the dead bodies with sticks.

“If there is some reason to think a crime has been committed, then people like the cabinet secretary are not to start poking their noses into it. It’s for the police to do that.”

But who directs the police?

In July 1990, Morrison was appointed Thatcher’s parliamentary private secretary (PPS).

Peter Wanless, chief executive of the NSPCC, says:

“It is plainly obvious . . . those at the highest level who once strode the corridors of power were putting their fear of political embarrassment above the risks to children.”

His point seems well founded.



Posted: 24th, July 2015 | In: Politicians, Reviews Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink