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Anorak | Liverpool move to lower footballers’ obscene wages

Liverpool move to lower footballers’ obscene wages

by | 14th, October 2016

Liverpool are keen to prevent the “too much, too young” culture that infects professional football by bringing a wage cap for younger players.

The Telegraph says Liverpool will not allow a footballer age 17 or under to earn more than £40,000 in their first season as a professional.

Too often players go off the rails when they are given the financial power that comes with being a professional footballer, and Liverpool are looking to try and reduce the risk of young and talented players going to waste.

The youngsters will be allowed to boost their salaries with performance-related bonuses and breaking into Under-23 and senior sides.

Is 40k too low? Too high? In 2016 the Daily Mail reported the average wages paid in British football.

Last season, first-team average salaries were around £1.7million a year

Average basic pay in the Championship was £324,250 per player per year

Figure dropped to £69,500 in League One and £40,350 in League Two

Would you prefer to earn £40,000 playing for Liverpool youth sides or the Plymouth Argyle first team in League Two?Should wages be more performance-related?

In 1960, Jimmy Hill was embarked on in his campaign to abolish the Football League’s maximum wage which stood then at just £20 a week. Hill won.  A wage bill from August 17, 1960, shows that Liverpool’s Roger Hunt took home £22 after bonuses, tax and insurance. He’d go on to be part of the England team that won the World Cup in 1966. What would he earn in these post-Bosman times?

In  The Football Man, Arthur Hopcraft says such wages were   “derisive in comparison with what could be earned by entertainers performing in front of much smaller audiences in, say, the theatre or cabaret… [and] small beer to what could be earned on the production lines of the country’s post-war, streamlined factories.”

Nowadays players earn a fortune. In 2009, Premier League clubs spent £1.2 billion on players’ wages in 2007-08, so passing he billion mark for the first time.

The game is rich with TV cash and owners’ money. But if the players don’t get the cash, who will? Will

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Posted: 14th, October 2016 | In: Liverpool, Manchester City, Money, News, Sports Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink