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Anorak | Busy Bins: ripped off Manchester homeowners pay private company to collect rubbish

Busy Bins: ripped off Manchester homeowners pay private company to collect rubbish

by | 7th, November 2016

Human skill fills the voice in Manchester, where bin collecting has become a luxury. You’d think getting rid of human waste would be a priority for any Western society, living longer and better on the back of improved hygiene and the availability of fresh water and cheap food. But in Manchester, collecting rubbish is a lifestyle choice.

Some householders in Greater Manchester are paying a private firm to empty their bins. Many are angry because some councils have reduced rubbish collections in an attempt to cut costs, and to motivate people to recycle more.

You’re motivated to recycle by having overflowing bins? Maybe not. For every problem, ingenious humanity conjures a solution:

A local businessman who bought himself a truck eighteen months ago is now emptying up to 800 bins a week.

Where there’s muck, there’s brass. Across the Manchester area, councils plan to empty bins every three weeks.

Manchester Council had a plan:

Between 1 August and the end of October 2016 we’re taking your old rubbish bin away and replacing it with a new, smaller grey one. We’ll put an information sticker on your old bin on the collection day 2 weeks before the swap.

On the day of your swap we’ll take away your old bin and recycle it.

We’ll leave new grey bins outside front doors or in front gardens, anytime during the day until 7pm. Your address will be on your new bin.

We can’t let you keep your old larger bin – the switch to smaller bins is to help cut the amount of waste from grey/black bins and increase recycling – so we won’t empty old bins after the swap.

In June 2016, the MEN reported:

Coun Nigel Murphy, the council’s executive member for neighbourhoods, said: “When recyclable waste is put into the wrong bin, money is being needlessly being thrown away. Taking this action to boost Manchester’s recycling rates now will save the city almost £2.5m every year in waste disposal costs, helping to protect the vital council services that residents care about for the long-term future, while also helping the environment.

“Doing nothing is not an option and we are determined to work with residents to ensure that as much waste as possible is recycled.”

In steps Bury Bins.

Josh Morris, a 25-year-old businessman who is licensed to handle environmental waste, manages the bin collection service in Greater Manchester.

Local authority rubbish collection day – green wheelie bin being loaded onto a refuse cart, UK ALAMY

After starting in his hometown Bury, he quickly expanded his services to nearby Rochdale and Oldham due to a huge spike in demand.

He told the Daily Mail: “I started with a van last year. Now I have three trucks collecting 200 bins a day.”

He sends the rubbish he collects to a private sorting plant.

Says Josh of Busy Bins, “…apart from the regular emptying of their bin, they absolutely love the fact we put their bins back outside their home & not down the road.”

Adding:

“Many households struggle to keep on top of their rubbish following the reduced bin size, citing problems with overflowing bins, fly-tipping, bad smells and increased problems from flies and rats.

“It’s a problem that a significant number of households’ face and our service provides people with the option to have their bin emptied before it is overflowing”.

People will pay for a good service. Demand and supply, right?



Posted: 7th, November 2016 | In: Key Posts, Money, Reviews Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink