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Anorak | After Grenfell: the rush to be the victims’ conscience

After Grenfell: the rush to be the victims’ conscience

by | 15th, June 2017

The horror at Grenfell Tower fire dominates the news. The fire shouldn’t happened. After fires at King’s Cross station and Bradford football ground took many lives, prevention became the watchword. A fire and building inspector told media “if there is a fire in any of these buildings, you’d expect it to be contained to an individual apartment. You wouldn’t expect it to spread in anything like the way, and certainly not in the time, that we’ve actually seen here.” But the level of prevention was inadequate.

The appalling scene at the 1974-built tower block in West London scars the mind. Volunteers are flocking to the site of the disaster. The stricken and bereaved are not echoes. We see them.

 

 

The faces of the dead pepper the front page like bullets holes. Most of us didn’t know them but, boy, can we feel the pain.

And it spreads. Already the newspapers are out of time. The present is fleeting. Twelve dead, says the Mirror’s  cover. The figure is now 17. The newspapers try to report and make sense of the terrifying blaze. The Daily Mail produces a special edition with 21 pages, all led by the question “How the hell could it happen?” “Tragic. Horrific. Avoidable,” says the ‘i’ newspaper. The Sun has 18 pages of coverage, leading with “They were told it was safe”. “Warnings were ignored,” says the Guardian’s front page.

 

 

 

 

The papers’ questions can be distilled: who is to blame? Surely we should wait until we know the facts before naming and shaming any guilty parties, if there are

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Posted: 15th, June 2017 | In: Google News, Key Posts Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink