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Anorak | Parents arrested for their children’s ‘citizen porn’

Parents arrested for their children’s ‘citizen porn’

by | 31st, January 2018

Is it right that the wrongs of the child are visited on the parent? The police think it is. If you pay for your child’s phone – getting a contract when under 18 is impossible so many parents do – the cops reckon you’re responsible for how that phone’s used. If it’s been used for sexting, say, then police can raid the family home, seize computers and phones, and nick mum and dad for being perverts and paedos.

Distributing indecent images of a child is a crime. There will be times when the victim is real and abuse is all too clear. But should your teenage son showing his mates a snapshot of his girlfriend’s naked breasts – the photo she chose to send him – involve the police and indelible criminal records for all involved, including her? Isn’t that an hysterical overreaction to an act of hormone-fed stupidity? Anyone who thinks they can control a nude or racy selfie once its been published on the web is a fool and should be aware that humiliation looms. But being young and stupid isn’t a crime, at least it shouldn’t be.

And maybe the kids sext because the adults do? Can we talk about why people sext? Columnists on bottom-shelf newspapers champion “citizen porn“; naked photos of the great and good stored on ‘clouds’ are leaked; academics like Jenna Wortham decided to explore “the way that our phones … foster intimate interactions that feel so personal and deep, despite being relayed through a machine.” As Andrew Sullivan noted: “Humans are sexual beings, and given a new obsessive-compulsive toy to play with, the Internet, their first instinct was to see how they could use it to get off.”

But the good news is that wherever parents are failing, the trusty cops are on hand to take over. Says Detective Superintendent Susie Harper, head of Kent’s public protection safeguarding unit:

“If a child’s mobile phone contract is in his or her parent’s name, then the parent can be liable for what the phone is used for, and any indecent material that is saved or sent from it. That could mean police turning up at the family home with a search warrant, property being seized, potential arrests and innocent people being suspected of serious offences.”

All parents are suspects. Careful where you leave those car keys, mum, because if junior nicks them and goes joyriding, it’s your fault. Lock ’em away. Lock all your valuables away, too, plus any pharmaceuticals, knives and balaclavas. If the fruit of your loins commits a crime using something your bought, on your head be it. It’s not his fault. It’s yours.

Says Harper:

“I’m not raising awareness to scaremonger.”

But:

“I also think it’s important for parents to be aware about the ways their children might be vulnerable to these things and what they can do about it.”

What can they do about it, then, other than buying their own children a phone with their own money? Well, the cops want “all parents and carers to speak to their children about the possible consequences of taking and sharing nude images of themselves or other young people”. Not a bad idea. But it’s not a police matter.

The message is clear: if you’ve got dirty photos on your phone – maybe a nude selfie you sent a loving boyfriend or girlfriend – your parents’ livelihoods and liberty are imperilled. If there’s something nasty in your inbox, don’t tell anyone, lest your parents be branded criminals. And above all know this: sex is first and foremost a potentially criminal act beloved by degenerates; sex has nothing to do with intimacy, self-awareness, desire and love; the youth invented voyeurism; and you should trust no-one except the State.

Spotter Telegraph

 



Posted: 31st, January 2018 | In: News, Technology Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink