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The Interview: the best reactions to Sony’s cyber war with North Korea

the interview The Interview: the best reactions to Sonys cyber war with North Korea

 

Obama and the FBI blame the hacking attacks against Sony Pictures on North Korea. Who knew the DPRK regime was capable? The hacks were triggered by the The Interview, in which two American journalists played by James Franco and Seth Rogen set out to assassinate North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

Amid threats of movie theater terrorism, Sony pulled the film from its Christmas Day release.

Reactions have been many:

The Conspiracy of Censors – Roger L. Simon:

The whole Sony story has a certain twisted dark comedy flavor with CEO Michael Lynton bickering with Obama over the release of what is said to be an unwatchable movie. It sure looks that way from the trailers.  If the NORKS had any brains, they should just have let the film be released and it would have sunk like a stone.  But perhaps they had other intentions — or someone did — beyond making fun of inane Hollywood studio executives or even silencing a movie.

The cyber attack on the studio has a serious side and it’s not really about North Korea.  It’s about who helped North Korea, the assumption being that the NORKS don’t quite have the technical expertise to pull this off by themselves.  Russia, China and Iran are the three candidates whose names have been thrown into the hopper as possible co-perps — maybe more than one of them.

Al Sharpton runs Hollywood:

Hollywood ​came to the Rev. Al Thursday as embattled Sony exec Amy Pascal ​met ​privately with the ​black leader for 90 minutes ​in a bid to fix the fallout from the ​cyberhacking ​leak of embarrassing, racially charged emails.

Pascal agreed to let Sharpton have a say in how Sony makes motion pictures, in an effort to combat what he called “inflexible and immovable racial exclusion in Hollywood.”

“We have agreed to having a working group deal with the racial bias and lack of diversity in Hollywood,” said Sharpton.

Obama on hack: “Sony made a mistake” in killing ‘The Interview’ – Xenio Jardin:

One important point in the President’s remarks today: a potentially ominous nod to the need for more regulation and control over the internet. The internet now is like “the Wild West,” he said, “We need more rules about how the internet should operate.” Cybersecurity is an urgent issue, and the Sony hacks underscore that, said the president. But when heads of state talk about more state control over the internet, rarely does greater freedom of speech result.

Axis of Evil 1 – USA 0:

 

Screen shot 2014 12 20 at 08.04.54 The Interview: the best reactions to Sonys cyber war with North Korea

 

Appeasement – Jonah Golberg:

The only problem: At least one cable company preemptively surrendered to North Korean intimidation, too, reportedly saying it would not air the film. Now, even if Sony had a backbone transplant, it couldn’t release the movie.

Sony could still dump it on the Internet and let it spread virally. It would lose ticket sales, but the company would strike a defiant blow nonetheless.

Don’t hold your breath. Sony would rather go the way of appeasement. And so would everyone else, it seems.

Regime Change in Hollywood:

For Pascal, 56, and Sony Pictures CEO Michael Lynton, 54, the damage has gotten far worse as the flood of stolen material — including both of their email inboxes — keeps coming, and on Dec. 16, the hackers, dubbed Guardians of Peace, threatened a 9/11-style attack on theaters that show Seth Rogen’s North Korea assassination comedy The Interview. Pascal, the lead creative executive on Interview, tells THR she believes she has the backing of her Tokyo-based employers. But by now, high-level insiders have moved from speculating about whether she will be replaced to asking when and by whom.

Copping the Flacco – Slate:

The James Flacco Name Generator

At a press conference on Friday, President Obama said Sony made “a mistake” by canceling the release of The Interview. He also praised the film’s stars Seth Rogen and James … Flacco? If, like actor James Franco, you want a new last name—one you can share with an NFL quarterback—then use our name generator below.

Try it:

 

Screen shot 2014 12 20 at 08.30.06 The Interview: the best reactions to Sonys cyber war with North Korea

 

China wins – Freddie de Boer:

What I wonder is why people aren’t a little more put off by a form of censorship that is more insidious, and will likely affect far more movies in the long run: the soft censorship of appealing to the Chinese government in order to reap the Chinese box office. There have been widespread claims that recent blockbuster movies like the latest Transformers have been written so as to appease Chinese censors. There’s nothing wrong with writing movies to reach out to a particularly huge foreign box office– why wouldn’t you want your movie to play to Chinese moviegoers?– but appealing to the Chinese government is a whole other ball of wax. That’s where you can see genuine self-censorship coming in. And while I imagine that this whole thing will blow over before long, without a great deal of long-term damage, I think the urge to play in China -and for the Chinese government — will only grow over time.

Andrew Sullivan:

The problem of willingly selling out to the Chinese reminded me of Ayn Rand, whose bracing moral lessons I’m sure Freddie had in the back of his mind. Rand’s finest novel,The Fountainhead, is an anti-capitalist screed about the spiritual and cultural evil of catering to market demand. Forget the problem of giving the commie censors what they want. It’s wrong to give the free market what it wants, when what it wants is aesthetically debased, which it always is. The architect hero of The Fountainhead, Howard Roark, is the ultimate in spine, the patron saint of never selling out. When one of his perfect, austere modernist buildings is bowdlerized the better to suit the public taste, he blows it up. That’s right, Howard Roark is a terrorist, a jihadi for artistic integrity. Maybe Howard Roark is the answer. Maybe can show us the way. Maybe Sony needs to feel that it is unsafe not to release The Interview. Maybe Seth Rogen needs to blow something up! Or maybe Brian Beutler is on to something, and the best we can do is call on Anonymous to steal the movie and make sure that, in this case at least, market-based American spinelessness can’t put a gag on our precious stoner auteurs.

Back Sony with cash – Jonathan Chait:

Sony is a for-profit entity, and not even an American one, that effectively has important influence over American culture. We don’t entrust for-profit entities with the common defense. And recognizing that the threat to a Sony picture is actually a threat to the freedom of American culture ought to lead us to a public rather than a private solution.

The federal government should take financial responsibility. Either Washington should guarantee Sony’s financial liability in the event of an attack, or it should directly reimburse the studio’s projected losses so it can release the movie online for free. The latter solution has the attractive benefit of ensuring a far wider audience for the film than it would otherwise have attracted.

Show me the alien cockroach – Peter Sudeman:

After Sony Pictures announced yesterday that it was pulling the release of The Interview, a film about two American journalists sent to assassinate North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, from its scheduled Christmas Day release after threats of movie theater terrorism, several theaters across the U.S. said that they would show Team America: World Police instead.

The basic idea was to replace one movie mocking the North Korean regime with another. Team America, an all-puppet comedy from South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone, pits its heroes against a sad-sack version of former North Korean leader Kim Jong-il. At the end of the movie, he’s impaled on a giant spike, and it’s revealed that he’s actually an alien cockroach. Fitting!..

The Daily Beastreports that theaters in Cleveland and Atlanta that had planned to make the switch say that Paramount, the studio behind Team America, has ordered them to stop. The Alamo Drafthouse in Texas, which also planned to show the puppet comedy, announced on Twitter this afternoon that due to “circumstances beyond our control” its Team America screening has been cancelled…. blocking replacement screenings of Team America can really only be described as next-level cowardly bullshit.

 

 

 

Sony was just the latest – Janice Turner:

Not only has Paramount pulled Team America, a decade-old puppet comedy parodying Kim Jong Un’s father, but a Steve Carell movie based upon the graphic novel Pyongyang. This is no comic, but an account by Guy Delisle of his time as an animator in a North Korean studio, constantly monitored by minders yet getting glimpses of the regime in all its absurdity and horror. This is a film that needed to be made.

And when the Sony cave-in was announced, Carell tweeted a still from The Great Dictator. It is an apt comparison: Charlie Chaplin’s devastating and humane 1940 parody did not bring down Hitler but it gave succour to those who were trying. Such was its propaganda value that while it was in production and Britain was still pursuing appeasement, the government planned to ban it for fear of riling the Führer. It was inspired by Chaplin watching Leni Riefenstahl’s Triumph of the Will: while other anti-Nazis were awed and dismayed by its grandiosity, Chaplin fell about laughing…

…too often, the response to any threat has been cowardice and complicity. Hollywood just behaved like the entire British establishment which dropped Salman Rushdie after The Satanic Verses rather than turning on his illiberal persecutors. And even now Newsnight refuses to show an affectionate Jesus and Mo cartoon depicting the Prophet Muhammad, siding with Salafist extremists rather than moderate Muslims who argued the image was inoffensive.

What if one of America’s violent anti-choice groups threatens cinemas showing a film in which a woman has abortion? Will we capitulate every time the lawyers get nervous? Because Sony Pictures just put artistic freedom in turnaround. And this is no joke.

Free speech has been under attack for an age. North Korea was just picking up the vibe…

Posted: 20th, December 2014 | In: Film, Key Posts, News, Politicians | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Being Stavros: jibes and snides when a 30 stone man enters Mr Gay UK

Screen shot 2014 12 12 at 09.58.56 Being Stavros: jibes and snides when a 30 stone man enters Mr Gay UK

 

Organisors of Mr Gay UK turn on a man for being not the ideal weight. Stavros Louca was robbed:

When Stavros decides to enter the Mr Gay UK beauty pageant nothing goes quite to plan. This is the story of one man’s unbreakable spirit – a tale of triumph, heartbreak and how to wear your underpants.

 

Being Stavros from jonothan mcleod on Vimeo.

Posted: 12th, December 2014 | In: Film | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Mark Kermode’s Reviews As Painfully Honest Film Posters

We love this. Patrick Smith has used BBC Five Live’s film critic Mark Kermode’s bon mots as film poster reviews.

Mark KErmode 3 Mark Kermodes Reviews As Painfully Honest Film Posters

 

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Posted: 2nd, December 2014 | In: Film | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Former Chelsea Footballer Frank Leboeuf On Acting And Dining With John Malkovich

cantona leboeuf Former Chelsea Footballer Frank Leboeuf On Acting And Dining With John Malkovich

 

THE Stephen Hawking biopic The Theory of Everything features a face familiar to fans of Chelsea FC.

The doctor is played by none other than Frank Leboeuf, star of such hits as Taking Sides (2001) and Le foot fait son cinéma (2003).

He tells the Radio Times:

In France I can’t audition because they still think I’m a footballer and don’t take me seriously. But in England they’ve given me the opportunity. I shot two movies here last year, Allies and The Theory of Everything. They give me a chance to show my new skill, and I’m thankful for that. People said very stupid things: they say, “Oh, every football player wants to act.” But there are only three really: Vinnie Jones, Eric Cantona and myself.

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Posted: 5th, November 2014 | In: Celebrities, Chelsea, Film, Sports | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Crap Cockneys: And The Nominations For The Worst London Accent Are…

the beaver accent Crap Cockneys: And The Nominations For The Worst London Accent Are…

 

 

Crap Cockneys

And the nominations for the worst London accent are…

 

Dick van Dyke (Mary Poppins)

The mother lode. To quote his song, ‘even though the sound of it is something quite atrocious’, there is something supercalifragilisticexpialidocious about Dick’s seminal cockney performance…

 

 

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Posted: 25th, October 2014 | In: Film, Key Posts | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Christmas Jumper-orama: The Hideous Gremlins And Fargo Sweats

READY for Christmas? Ready for your seasonal sweater?

Mondo have greated designs based on the 1984 film Gremlins and the 1996’s Fargo.

fargo 1 Christmas Jumper orama: The Hideous Gremlins And Fargo Sweats

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Posted: 19th, October 2014 | In: Fashion, Film | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


11 Who Should be Cast in Ghostbusters 3?

 

PA 2774253 11 Who Should be Cast in Ghostbusters 3?

Shown in this scene from the 1984 movie “Ghostbusters” are Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, center, and Harold Ramis. (AP Photo)

 

AS you may have heard, Ghostbusters 3 is definitely happening.

However, there’s a twist – writer and director Paul Feig says the new film will be an all-female Ghostbusters cast and he will be writing it alongside Kate Dippold (from Parks and Recreation).

Of course, some fanboiz are spitting feathers over this, as an all-female Ghostbusters isn’t what they had in mind at all. However, if the casting is right, this could be a brilliant addition to the franchise.

Feig said on Twitter: “It’s official. I’m making a new Ghostbusters & writing it with @katiedippold & yes, it will star hilarious women. That’s who I’m gonna call.”

So who could Feig cast? There’s a wealth of brilliant and funny actresses out there and everyone will have a shortlist of their own. Here are some of our favourites.

 

Tina Fey

Tina Fey is one of the funniest humans on the planet. Whether she’d take the Ghostbusters role is another matter, but producers should be throwing money at her.

 

Mayim Bialik

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Posted: 9th, October 2014 | In: Celebrities, Film, News | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Every Perverted Corporate Logo From Idiocracy

Idiocity Every Perverted Corporate Logo From Idiocracy

 

THE film Idiocracy features perverted corporate logos created by Ellen Lampl. She tells TriviaHappy:

“A visual vernacular fusion of Nascar, candy packaging, Mexico handpainted signs and Japanese pop culture…

“Sometimes in comedy, graphics are the straight man. But, in Idiocracy, we let it be absurd, as part of the experience. We realized that life in its present state already had tendencies towards the ridiculous—branding seeps in everywhere—so we let it be over the top.”

 

idiocracy posters 11 Every Perverted Corporate Logo From Idiocracy

 

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Posted: 7th, October 2014 | In: Film | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Joe Carnahan Fast Forwards To The Sex Scene: How To Fake A Hollywood Orgasma, A Video Guide

sex scene Joe Carnahan Fast Forwards To The Sex Scene: How To Fake A Hollywood Orgasma, A Video Guide

EVER filmed a Hollyood sex scene?

Joe Carnahan filmed one for his new film Stretch. To help us understand the process, he’s released this behind-the-scenes video of the film’s fast-forward-to scene. You will see Brooklyn Decker and Patrick Wilson getting into the loving zoone and then engaging in the full 10 seconds dry-humping coitus.

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Posted: 6th, October 2014 | In: Film | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Uncle Monty’s Rolls-Royce From ‘Withnail & I’ Is For Sale

uncle montys car Uncle Montys Rolls Royce From Withnail & I Is For Sale

 

UNCLE Monty’s 1953 Silver Wraith by Hooper & Co.is for sale. Last seen in the wonderful film Withnail and I, this is your chance to live the dream.

 

uncle montys car 1 Uncle Montys Rolls Royce From Withnail & I Is For Sale

 

Owned by Nubar Gulbenkian (1896 – 1972), the car is showy affair.

 

Nubar Sarkis Gulbenkian 2.VI .1896 – 10.I.1972 Armenian Petroleum Magnate Socialite Uncle Montys Rolls Royce From Withnail & I Is For Sale

Nubar Sarkis Gulbenkian
2.VI.1896 – 10.I.1972
Armenian Petroleum Magnate & Socialite

 

Mr Gulbenkian is profiled:

“I’ve been retired all my life,” explains Nubar Gulbenkian, now 69. “but I’ve also been working hard all my life. A fortune does not look after itself, after all.” The fortune Gulbenkian refers to is one of the largest in the world. He inherited it from his legendary father, Calouste; who was nicknamed “Mr. Five Percent” because that was his usual cut on Middle Eastern oil and who owned possibly the world’s greatest art collection. Nubar, an Armenian, was exported in a Gladstone bag from his birthplace in Turkey, a land then inhospitable to Armenians, when he was only a few weeks old. Educated in England and France, he has been married three times and would be an impressive figure, even if he lacked his father’s business acumen (which he doesn’t), for his stupendous eyebrows, well trimmed beard, monocle and a habit of inserting into his lapel every morning a fresh orchid, the color chosen to suit the occasion. He has just written an autobiography, Portrait In Oil (Simon & Schuster), in which he discusses not only his finances but his voracious appetite for preferred pleasures like foxhunting, riding, food, drink, the odes of Horace, and driving, which he took up shortly after his 65th birthday. “If something is too much of a bore to do thoroughly and with zest,” says Gulbenkian, “then don’t bother to do it at all.”

 

PA 4410347 Uncle Montys Rolls Royce From Withnail & I Is For Sale

Nubar Gulbenkian, the well known oil magnate, examines a Vintage Claret during the French wine tasting reception held in the cellars of Lebegue, the well known London wine merchants
Date: 09/10/1964

 

 

When asked whether he most enjoys city life or country life, horses or Rolls-Royces, old brandy or young women, Nubar Gulbenkian reflectively strokes his luxuriant beard, puffs deeply on his cigar and makes a simple affirmation of love for the business of good living: “I prefer everything.”

 

PA 4323751 Uncle Montys Rolls Royce From Withnail & I Is For Sale

Philanthropist and bon viveur, Nubar Gulbenkian
Date: 04/05/1961

 

 

For £250000 o.n.o, you get a long wheelbase, coach built, 4.5litre vehicle one off with snakeskin trim, electic windows, Sedanca de Ville style roof, air con. and a speedometer in the back, so allowing Gulbenkian to keep tabs on his chauffeur and ensure he drove quickly.

 

Screen shot 2014 10 05 at 21.22.13 Uncle Montys Rolls Royce From Withnail & I Is For Sale

 

Bid at Frank Dale & Stepsons.

Posted: 5th, October 2014 | In: Cars, Film | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The Best Worst Last Films by Legendary Actors

wagons east The Best Worst Last Films by Legendary Actors

 

DEATH is a terrible inevitability. You could pop your considerable clogs at any given moment. You might be half way through a banana. You could be mid-poo, like Elvis. You could be *this close* to finishing that computer game that proved so difficult all those years. You might suddenly die just before someone finishes a joke.

Worse than all these things put together, is when great actors die before they’ve had the chance to do one last film that is any good.

There’s a whole host of brilliant actors who have been in absolute crap – Robert De Niro in ‘The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle’, Michael Caine in ‘Jaws: The Revenge’, Kevin Spacey in ‘Fred Claus’, Faye Dunaway in ‘Dunston Checks In’ and Al Pacino in Adam Sandler’s beyond woeful ‘Jack & Jill’.

However, they all got another shot at correcting the blips on their showreels.

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Posted: 16th, September 2014 | In: Film | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The Truth About Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey Letter

femur The Truth About Stanley Kubricks  2001: A Space Odyssey Letter

 

 

YOU’LL have seen the sweary letter signed ‘Stanley Kubrick’ written  to the head of AGM about the sequel to 2001: A Space Odyssey.

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Posted: 16th, September 2014 | In: Film | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Watch Dock Ellis The Movie: ‘I Took LSD And Pitched A Perfect Game For the Pittsburgh Pirates’

PA 6669778 Watch Dock Ellis The Movie: I Took LSD And Pitched A Perfect Game For the Pittsburgh Pirates

Pittsburgh Pirates Pitcher Dock Ellis expresses his sentiments about West Division Winners San Francisco Giants, after their win, Thursday, in this Oct. 1, 1971 file photo taken in Philadelphia, Pa.

 

DRUGS and sport is a familiar story.  One school of thought says all drugs cheats should be banned. Another says that since cheating is rife, why not make the drugs legal.

Dock Ellis took drugs and played pro sports. He’s the subject of the film No No: A Dockumentary.

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Posted: 7th, September 2014 | In: Film, Sports | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Watch Grant Meyers Use Raw Meat And Toilet Plungers To Make Porno Films Sound Effects

GRANT Meyers makes sound effects for porn films:

 

Posted: 31st, August 2014 | In: Film | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Watch 1896 Footage Of Life In Palestine

IN 1896, French brothers Auguste and Louis Lumière‘s cameramen filmed life in Palestine, then part of the Ottoman Empire. All 500,000 inhabitants were subjects of the Sultan of Constantinople.

 Lobster Films found the reels. Serge Bromberg, the company’s co-founder, explains:

…this year, we have something very special to show. In an antique shop, we have discovered 93 wonderful little camera negatives from c. 1897, all shot in the Middle East (Jerusalem, Palestine, Egypt.[…] etc), that would form an ideal 80 [minute] program of what could be among the earliest films shot in the region still in existence. … They are in wonderful condition … Not a scratch, no decomposition, and those little sprocket holes typical of the films of that year.

This clip is from documentary Palestine: histoire d’une terre 1880-1950.

Spotter: Sabotage Times

Posted: 24th, July 2014 | In: Film | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Woody Allen Was Right! Steak Is Healthy!

 

WAY back in 1973 Woody Allen did a movie called Sleeper, from which comes this little scene above. The idea was that he went to sleep for 200 years and thus has to learn how to deal with his new world that he wakes up in. Sorta a Woody Allen take on Rip Van Winkle.

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Posted: 19th, July 2014 | In: Film, News | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


See Andre 3000 as Jimi Hendrix in All Is By My Side Trailer

PA 2089552 See Andre 3000 as Jimi Hendrix in All Is By My Side Trailer

 

ROCK biopics are always fun, even if they’re not always good. There’s been mixed movies, from The Runaways to The Doors, from Ray to What We Do Is Secret. Even the crappy ones are still worth a look because, even if the storytelling and acting is lousy, at least the music will be great.

And so, we’re looking down the barrel of a Jimi Hendrix biopic and there’s a lot riding on it.

Why? Well, Hendrix was a smooth, fascinating character with a preposterous talent and a gentle soul – that’s not easy to capture. Moreover, Outkast’s brilliant Andre 3000/Benjamin is playing the title role. There’s no-one on Earth who wants this to fail.

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Posted: 8th, July 2014 | In: Film, Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


10 Ridiculous (But Awesome) Horror Movie Tag-Lines of the 1980s

     80tagline9 10 Ridiculous (But Awesome) Horror Movie Tag Lines of the 1980s

 

IF the Seventies proved a fertile time for imaginative horror filmmakers, the 1980s very much represented a new age of plenty, a span wherein every idea that had worked in a movie once before was hauled out a second, third and sometimes fourth time.

And because of the home video revolution and VHS technology, new filmmakers had the opportunity to get their movies seen by more eyes than ever before.

In terms of the decade’s horror then, there was more of everything to enjoy: more slasher films, more Jaws films, and more holiday-themed horrors too.

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Posted: 30th, June 2014 | In: Film, Flashback, Key Posts | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The Day of the Animals: The 5 Strangest ‘Revenge-of-Nature’ Movies of the 1970s

revengeofnature1 195x300 The Day of the Animals: The 5 Strangest Revenge of Nature Movies of the 1970s

 

 

IT’S not nice to fool with Mother Nature.

In the seventies, science fiction and horror filmmakers were certain that mankind was going to soon face his comeuppance for polluting and over-populating Mother Earth. And more so, that this comeuppance was going to be delivered at the paws, claws, talons, webbed fingers, and teeth of our former friends: the animals.

Call it the Circle of Death.

Between 1970 and 1979, more than a dozen genre films involved Mother Nature striking back against man for his mis-use of pesticides, his damage of the ozone layer, and for polluting previously unspoiled terrain.

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Posted: 30th, June 2014 | In: Film, Flashback | Comment (1) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Eli Wallach Takes Photos On The Set Of MacKenna’s Gold, 1967

FLASHBAK to August 4 1967:

 

PA 7120086 Eli Wallach Takes Photos On The Set Of MacKennas Gold, 1967

 

Actor Eli Wallach takes advantage of the studio lights on the set of “MacKenna’s Gold,” Aug. 4, 1967, to make some stills of tone of his co-stars in the film, Edward G. Robinson. Robinson plays the role of an almost blind prospector. Wallach adjusts the lights on his subject and takes pictures with his own Nikon F camera. (AP Photo/David F. Smith)

Posted: 25th, June 2014 | In: Celebrities, Film, Flashback | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Fartzenegger Blows: The Best Farts From Arnold Schwarzenegger Movies

ARNOLD Farzenegger:

 

Posted: 23rd, June 2014 | In: Film | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Straight Outta Central Casting: First Look At The Cast For The NWA Biopic

HIP HOP royalty, Dr. Dre, has shared details of the forthcoming NWA film ‘Straight Outta Compton’, stating that the biopic will see release on August 14, 2015.

The film will tell the tale of how NWA – Dr Dre, Ice Cube and the late Eazy E – came to be.

Dre and Eazy E will be played by newcomers while Ice Cube’s own son will play his father. You have to hope there’s no sex scenes with an actress playing his mother, because that would be weird.

Yesterday, Dre tweeted an image of the cast, and they really look the part, if better looking than the original members.

 

Bqblvr CcAAniv2 Straight Outta Central Casting: First Look At The Cast For The NWA Biopic

 

Ice Cube will be played by O’Shea Jackson Jr, while Dre will be played by Marcus Callender who has had some roles in Criminal Justice, Blue Bloods and Elementary. It is thought that Dre wanted Michael B Jordan, but he’s signed up for the The Fantastic Four franchise.

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Posted: 20th, June 2014 | In: Film, Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


‘The Same Animals…Only Functioning Less Perfectly:’ The Five Most Underrated George A. Romero Movies

romero6 300x162 The Same Animals…Only Functioning Less Perfectly: The Five Most Underrated George A. Romero Movies

 

GEORGE Romero’s impressive movie-making career stretches back to the Pittsburgh area in the late 1960s and spans over forty years.

Like many horror filmmakers of his generation, Romero has seen his share of big successes, like Dawn of the Dead (1978) and Creepshow (1982), critical darlings like Martin (1976), cult classics such as The Crazies (1973) and the occasional out-right bomb, like Diary of the Dead (2007).

But several of Romero’s finer films didn’t meet with financial or critical success, and deserve to have further light shone on them.  Accordingly, my selections for the most underrated of his feature films are listed below.

 

 

 

romero4 300x168 The Same Animals…Only Functioning Less Perfectly: The Five Most Underrated George A. Romero Movies 

 

Hungry Wives (1971)

George Romero’s self-described “feminist” horror movie, also known as Jack’s Wife and Season of the Witch, involves a bored suburban house-wife, Joan Mitchell (Jan White) who is only able to define herself in terms of her place in the suburbs as a married woman and a home-maker.

In an attempt to rebel against her “accepted” role in society, Joan delves into witchcraft and then adultery, but the movie’s crafty point is, commendably, that witchcraft is no more defining or self-actualizing for Joan than being a house-wife had been. She has merely changed her demographic affiliation or club, while everything else in her life remains the same

Hungry Wives is so powerfully-wrought because George Romero serves as both editor and director, and his editing flights-of-fancy make the movie’s point plain in terms of visualizations.  Early on, for instance, Joan experiences a telling dream in which her husband leads her around on a leash, like a dog.  One of the film’s final images reveals Joan involved in a coven ritual, a red rope looped about her neck, and the symbolism is plain: she has merely traded one trap for another. This visual counterpoint is underlined by the counsel of Joan’s therapist, who advises her that she is imprisoning herself, and must change that pattern if she hopes to make her life better.

 

 

 

romero1 300x162 The Same Animals…Only Functioning Less Perfectly: The Five Most Underrated George A. Romero Movies

 

Day of the Dead (1985)

Before 2007 at least, Day of the Dead (1985) was the least-appreciated of the famous Romero living Dead cycle. This lack of approbation was a result, in part,of the film’s overtly and relentlessly serious tone.  For all its mayhem and violence, Dawn of the Dead — set at a shopping mall — also had a fun or jaunty side to it.  But Day of the Dead proved a totally different animal: a solemn and extremely gory exploration of mankind’s last chapter as the dominant species on Earth.

Rather unconventionally, the movie ends with a committed and likable protagonist, Sarah (Lori Cardille) realizing it is all over but the crying, and essentially giving up the fight so as to live her last years (and the last years of humanity…) on a nice island beach somewhere with two decadent helicopter pilots.

But importantly, Day of the Dead also moves the cycle forward in significant fashion via its introduction of Bub (Howard Sherman), a zombie who has been domesticated, after a fashion, and reveals both rudimentary memory, and rudimentary humanity.

In fact, this lovable zombie shows more humanity than the film’s brutal military leader, Rhodes (Joe Pilato), and thereby suggests that the change in the social order might not be all that bad, if the zombies continue to evolve towards something…civilized.

Finally, Day of the Dead features an epic and awe-inspiring opening,:a view of a city in Florida completely overrun by the living dead.  This moment is arguably the biggest in scope of the entire dead run, and establishes brilliantly the zombies’ numerical advantage.  As this shot reveals,  Day of the Dead is actually the Twilight of Man.

 

 

 

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Monkey Shines (1988)

I still remember discussing this Romero horror film at length with visiting movie critic Molly Haskell at the University of Richmond in the late 1980s. We agreed that the critical community had virtually ignored what was a very powerful and very relevant film about human nature.

Monkey Shines involves a man, Allan (Jason Beghe) who is paralyzed in an accident and becomes a quadriplegic.  As such, he is provided by his scientist friend (John Pankow) a capuchin monkey named Ella to act as his arms and legs.  Before long, Ella and Allan form a close bond of friendship and dependence…but then each begins acting on each other’s emotional states and desires.  Soon bloody murder is being committed…but is it at Ellas behest, or Allan’s?

Monkey Shines informs audiences that the “devil” is “animal instinct,” which acts by its “own set of laws,” and then asks the pertinent question: are we that different from the lower animals we treat as pets?  Are we truly evolved, or — underneath the surface — are we just as violent and capricious as cousins in the jungle?

The scenes involving Ella in Monkey Shines are convincing and powerful, save for a few moments where an inert stand-in is clearly utilized, and the film’s debate about instinct (an avatar for the human subconscious in some critical way…) makes the film stand out in an era when rubber reality and slasher movies reigned supreme.

 

 

 

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The Dark Half (1993)

Here’s a Stephen King adaptation that almost nobody loves, or even remembers.  In The Dark Half (1993) Timothy Hutton plays Thad Beaumont, a writer grappling with his famous nom du plum, George Stark.  When Beaumont elects to kill his famous literary name, however, the alter ego comes to life and threatens the writer and his entire family.

A deliberate and modernJekyll-Hyde story, The Dark Half is part of an early 1990s “meta” or post-modern movement in horror.  Films such as Wes Craven’s New Nightmare (1994) and John Carpenter’s In The Mouth of Madness (1994) gazed at worlds in which the line between fiction and reality were blurred.  The Dark Half treads meaningfully in similar territory, and gazes at the act of writing as literally a physical birth, as an independent creation that – much like a human child – can no longer be fully controlled by its creator.

There’s nothing flashy or expensive about The Dark Half, and the ending is a bit of a bust, but otherwise Romero crafts a thoughtful, low-key horror film that possesses some electric jolts.  One early scene, set in an operating room is downright terrifying, and another — with a woman broaching an invader in her dark apartment — also gets the blood flowing.

More than anything, however, The Dark Half explores the idea that the creative act of writing represents a violent assertion of will.  “The only way to do it is to do it,” one character notes, and this same determination indeed is what wills the Dark George Stark into the world.

 

 

 

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Survival of the Dead (2009)

Survival of the Dead is yet another Romero living dead movie, and another seriously underrated work of art.  Since the very beginning of his career in 1968, director Romero has used his zombie saga to explore political and social issues of the time. 

For example, Night of the Living Dead speaks to the political violence and upheaval of 1968, and to race relations in America.  Dawn of the Dead very much concerns conspicuous consumption and the “Crisis in Confidence” Carter Age.  And Land of the Dead (2005) explores post 9/11 territory.

Similarly, Survival of the Dead is a thoughtful, point-for-point allegory for American involvement in the Iraq War.  Unfortunately, horror movie fans were too busy complaining about CGI blood effects to notice the movie’s clever thematic framework.

In short, Survival of the Dead involves a refugee, O’Flynn (Kenneth Welsh) — the fictional equivalent of Ahmed Chalabi — who tricks American armed forces into fighting his war for him, and ousting his enemy, Muldoon (Richard Fitzpatrick) — a Saddam Hussein figure – from the land that he would like to lead, paradise-like Plum Island.

Obligingly the National Guard moves in — guns blazing — only to find that matters aren’t so straight-forward.  The soldiers have become involved in a pissing match that, ultimately, doesn’t concern them or their well-being.

The film features an Old West sort of milieu on Plum Island, with rivals O’Flynn and Muldoon (Richard Fitzpatrick) wearing cowboy hats and riding horses while zombies (here called Dead-Heads) are trapped in the nearby corral.

Again, Romero’s thoughtful set-up makes it impossible not to think of the post-911 “dead or alive” rhetoric from the Bush White House. The film’s final imagery — which depicts cowboy zombie versions of O’Flynn and Muldoon trying to kill each other under a bright moon — makes one despair that human nature is ever going to change.

With neo-con dead-enders everywhere on cable news stations this week attempting to re-enlist America in the war in Iraq a decade later, Survival of the Dead is more relevant than ever.  Accordingly, this Romero film is really about discredited zombie ideologies that have long outlived their usefulness, but which keep coming back from the dead to threaten the rest of us.

Posted: 20th, June 2014 | In: Film, Flashback, Key Posts | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0