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Music news and reviews, music videos and tittle tattle, with a lingering look at the past from Anorak. A source for rock, pop, album and live music, new releases, artist interviews and features.

Lou Alder Is Missing: The Strange Story of the Kidnapped Music Mogul

Lou Alder Lou Alder Is Missing: The Strange Story of the Kidnapped Music Mogul

 

MUSIC legend, Lou Adler, is an inductee of the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame and responsible for a frightening amount of hits and given the world so much music that he should be beatified.

Adler founded and co-owned Dunhill Records (Jimmy Buffett, Solomon Burke, Thelma Houston, Steppenwolf, Joe Walsh, Van Der Graaf Generator, Dusty Springfield and more) and was the producer on the label.

After selling Dunhill, he founded Ode Records (Spirit, Carole King, Merry Clayton, Cheech & Chong, The Rocky Horror Picture Show and others) and helped to produce the Woodstock precursor, the Monterey International Pop Festival (where Hendrix famously set fire to his guitar during his version of ‘Wild Thing’).

He also managed surfer boys Jan & Dean, produced Sam Cooke and bagged two Grammy Awards in ’72 for his production skills on ‘It’s Too Late’ by Carole King and the ‘Tapestry’ LP. He’s the owner of the legendary Roxy Theatre on Sunset Strip in West Hollywood. He is best remembered for discovering The Mamas & Papas.

 

 

 

It is little wonder he got himself a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and can often be seen courtside with Jack Nicholson at LA Lakers games.

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Posted: 1st, September 2014 | In: Key Posts, Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Clem Cattini: British Pop’s Backbeat

clem cattini Clem Cattini: British Pops Backbeat

 

TODAY is the birthday of one of rock ‘n’ roll’s most legendary men… although, many won’t have ever heard of him. In 1939, in North London, the legendary Clem Cattini was born.

Cattini did shifts in his dad’s Italian restaurant before pursuing a career in music, starting things off with gigs at The 2i’s Coffee Bar, where he backed whoever turned up. He soon joined his own band called the Beat Boys, and from there, he started to get noticed.

And while a lot of people have never heard of Clem, he’s played on over 40 number one hit records and was one of the most prolific drummers in UK pop history. He’s worked with Joe Meek, Lou Reed, Cliff Richard, Hot Chocolate, Bay City Rollers, Benny Hill and loads more.

Cattini was so hot on the drumstool that he’d get called in to play the parts of bands who already had a drummer.

So with that, let us look at some of Clem’s most famous appearances. If anything, this list will show you just how versatile the great man is.

Happy birthday Clem!

 

 

Johnny Kidd and the Pirates ‘Shakin’ All Over’

 

 

Thunderclap Newman ‘Something In The Air’

 

 

The Tornados ‘Telstar’

 

 

Clive Dunn ‘Grandad’

 

 

Donovan ‘Hurdy Gurdy Man’

 

 

The Kinks ‘You Really Got Me’

 

 

The Walker Brothers ‘The Sun Ain’t Gonna Shine Anymore’

 

 

Dusty Springfield ‘You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me’

 

 

The Love Affair ‘Everlasting Love’

 

 

Renée and Renato ‘Save Your Love’

 

 

T-Rex ‘Get It On’

 

 

Posted: 28th, August 2014 | In: Key Posts, Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Kate Bush Sings About ‘Sex Machine’ Ken Livingstone

 

 

KATE Bush once sang a song about Ken Livingstone, former leader of the GLC, Member of Parliament and the first democratically-elected Mayor of London.

 

PA 1653815 Kate Bush Sings About Sex Machine Ken Livingstone

Mr Ken Livingstone, former leader of the GLC, and labour parliamentary candidate for the Brent East constituency, outside his campaign office. 1987.

 

 

Ken is the man that we all need,
Ken is the leader of the GLC.

Who is the man we all need? KEN!
Who is the funky sex machine? KEN!
Who is the leader of the GLC? KEN!
Who is the man we all need? KEN!

The Comic Strip revisited the tune:

Posted: 27th, August 2014 | In: Music, Politicians | Comment (1) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


August 26 1995: The Day That Britpop Died

NINETEEN years ago on this very day, all the way back in 1995, teenagers tuned into the chart rundown on Radio One to find out which of Britpop’s gargantuans were going to land the killer blow.

It was on the 26th August that Blur scored their first UK No.1 single with ‘Country House’ ahead of Oasis’ ‘Roll With It’.

Animosity had been high between the two camps, with Oasis hoping Blur would die of AIDS and generally dismissing them as Southern softies. Blur meanwhile sarcastically referred to Oasis as being like ‘Status Quo’, to which Oasis promptly started selling ‘Quoasis’ t-shirts.

It was puerile, pointless and a whole load of fun for people who like a narrative on their pop music.

 

oasis vs blur August 26 1995: The Day That Britpop Died

 

Both acts released their new singles on the same day, both landing in the top two slots in a month that was erratic at best. While Britpop duked it out, the run-up saw Robson & Jerome’s ‘Unchained Melody’ at the top spot, as well as Outhere Brothers’ ‘Boom Boom Boom’, Take That’s ‘Never Forget’ and followed by Michael Jackson’s ‘You Are Not Alone’ and Shaggy’s ‘Boombastic’.

It was a weird and brilliant summer.

However, as everyone knows, the most irritating thing about the whole battle was just how poor both band’s singles were. ‘Country House’ was Blur’s vision of Great Britain gone too far; too bloated on lager. ‘Roll With It’ was Oasis dialling it in, from a body of work that had stronger LP tracks and B-sides. Oasis ploughed through and became stadium-fillers while Blur slowly collapsed under the weight of their own skewed look on the world, before retreating away, ready to unleash ‘Beetlebum’ and ‘Song Two’ at everyone from their follow-up, eponymous LP.

The release of the two records effectively killed Britpop stone-dead, with only Pulp and the Super Furry Animals managing to maintain any sort of quality control thereafter, with Elastica vanishing down a smack hole, Suede losing their grot-glamour and exchanging it for sickly, pristine Bowie tributes. Things were in such a bad way that Dodgy became headline acts.

The fallout from this Battle of Britpop opened the door for Embrace, Coldplay, Travis and a whole new dawn of overly sincere and overwrought indie rock, which in turn, transformed into something the NME briefly dubbed NAM (New Acoustic Movement) with the likes of Alfie, Turin Breaks, Badly Drawn Boy and Ben & Jason.

Britpop’s bombast reached the zenith 19 years ago, and the momentum kept Oasis going for a while, while Blur got a little lost, touring the very dubious ‘Great Escape’ LP. Of course, it being Blur, it had some fine moments, but so quickly they’d gone from sparky and sarcastic, to getting lost in their own creation, that you couldn’t see the boys who made ‘Modern Life Is Rubbish’ in the fug of Camden cocaine anymore.

 

 

Both Oasis and Blur suffered in the immediate aftermath of 1995, and would have to regroup to get their motors running again, while their Britpop pals all slid into the Andy’s Records 9p Bargain Bin. Oasis were almost certainly the more determined of the two, filling Manchester City’s old Maine Road stadium and Doing Knebworth in 1996.

However, it wouldn’t be too long before they released the pretty terrible ‘Stand By Me’ and ‘All Around The World’ and hauled the flabby ‘Be Here Now’ LP around the planet while hanging around with Tony Blair in Downing Street for a ‘Cool Britannia’ photo-op.

 

 

While Oasis soldiered on until 2009, when Noel finally left. The band were exhausted and going mental. Blur meanwhile, saw Graham Coxon throwing the towel in, leaving Damon to create numerous projects.

And here we are, in 2014, and still, Blur and Oasis have our ears. Be it Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds or wonderful DVD commentary where he’s revealing himself to be a pleasantly daft old curmudgeon or Damon Albarn’s magpie approach to music, with record labels (Honest John’s) and his million bands; Dodgy, Shed Seven, The Bluetones, Menswear, Powder, Sleeper and all the rest, have all but vanished apart from in the hearts of corduroy wearing thirtysomethings.

 

 

With Britpop celebrating a 20th anniversary lately, it can only mean one thing – teenagers are going to start fetishising it and starting up bands that sound like Octopus.

God help us all.

Posted: 26th, August 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Hit or Bust: A Look At Pop Stars Immortalised In Statues

IT has been announced that a brass sculpture of Amy Winehouse is to be installed at Camden market, London.

The memorial has been designed by Scott Eaton and will be erected at the Stables market, not too far away from where the singer died so depressingly young in July 2011.

Amy’s father Mitch said he was happy about the new lifesize memorial, and that it will divert people away from paying tribute at her old house, which has “bad memories for everyone”.

“It’s a great honour to have the statue in the Stables. Amy was an integral part of Camden and still is, so you couldn’t really think of putting a statue for her anywhere else, could you really?” he told The Guardian.

Of course, Amy isn’t the first pop star to be graced with a statue in her honour. And if history tells us anything, it is that some memorial statues are better than others.

Let us look at some of the best and worst.

 

Phil Lynott

Thin Lizzy’s Phil Lynott might not be the most famous musician in the world, but something of a working class hero, it is great that he was immortalised in statue form on Harry Street in Dublin. Sadly, the statue itself kinda sucks.

 

Phil Lynott statue Hit or Bust: A Look At Pop Stars Immortalised In Statues

The Beatles

The Fab Four have a load of statues, but the ones in Houston are the best. Stylised and imposing, these giant Beatles were erected and, just to further the Paul Is Dead rumours, the Paul statue fell over after being blown at by some wind.

the beatles statue Hit or Bust: A Look At Pop Stars Immortalised In Statues

Michael Jackson

There’s a touching statue of MJ in a favela in Rio, but we’re not interested in that. We’re more into the ghastly effigy erected by Fulham FC outside their ground. An embarrassment to a lot of fans and the cause of much mirth elsewhere.

Michael Jackson Statue Hit or Bust: A Look At Pop Stars Immortalised In Statues

Billy Fury

At the Albert Docks in Liverpool, there’s a great statue of British rock ‘n’ roll’s finest, Billy Fury. Of course, a lot of people walk past it and assume it is Elvis, but there you go.

Statue of Billy Fury Hit or Bust: A Look At Pop Stars Immortalised In Statues

Otis Redding

One of the greatest voices to ever leap out of a human throat, Otis Redding passed away too young, just days after recording ‘(Sitting On The) Dock Of The Bay’. His sculpture sits in Gateway Park in Macon, Georgia. Here he is, being manhandled by a grinning white guy.

otis redding statue Hit or Bust: A Look At Pop Stars Immortalised In Statues

Jimi Hendrix

Jimi’s sculpture was unveiled in ’97 on Broadway Avenue in the Capital Hill/Broadway area of Hendrix’ hometown of Seattle. Sadly for Hendrix, they stuck him next to the road and had him grimacing at traffic.

hendrix statue Hit or Bust: A Look At Pop Stars Immortalised In Statues

Dolly Parton

In Sevierville, Tennessee, there’s a statue of a barefoot, young Dolly Parton with a guitar which is sometimes rubbed for good luck by locals and tourists. Dolly grew up in Sevierville. It is a reasonably nice statue of her, it has to be said.

seiverville dolly statue crop Hit or Bust: A Look At Pop Stars Immortalised In Statues

James Brown

The plaque on this statue of James Brown says: “Singer, songwriter and one-of-a-kind performer” and overlooks James Brown Plaza on Broad Street in Augusta, Ga. The person who made the statue, it seems, put a million teeth in The Godfather of Soul’s mouth. He looks a bit like a Critter.

james brown statue Hit or Bust: A Look At Pop Stars Immortalised In Statues

Johnny Ramone

The Ramones guitarist probably has the best statue in rock’s history, looking moody and cool while standing by the lake at Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Los Angeles. His ashes are in the base of his statue, which is near the grave of bandmate Dee Dee Ramone. The Ramones – even cool in death.

Johnny Ramone   Hollywood Forever Cemetery 1 Hit or Bust: A Look At Pop Stars Immortalised In Statues

Kurt Cobain

Aberdeen Washington decided to pay tribute to their iconic son who fronted Nirvana and, regrettably killed himself. However, you have to assume that, having seen the tribute, Cobain may actually prefer to be pushing up daisies.

Kurt Cobain statue Hit or Bust: A Look At Pop Stars Immortalised In Statues

Posted: 21st, August 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Happy Birthday Immediate Records, A TinPot Haven For The Thin And Beautiful

immediate Happy Birthday Immediate Records, A TinPot Haven For The Thin And Beautiful

 

ON this very day in 1965, something brilliant, eccentric and hip was born – Immediate Records.

In what has to be one of the finest record label names ever – c’mon, it’s everything a teenager wants from pop music – and purposefully moddish, Immediate was the baby of Rolling Stones’ manager Andrew Loog Oldham and his partner Tony Calder.

The launched the label with a hipster party, attended by some of pop’s great and good – Mick Jagger, Eric Clapton and Nico (not yet in the Velvet Underground) were all there, being thin and beautiful.

The label was the home of some very famous bands, such as The Small Faces, Rod Stewart and some ’60s favourites in The Nice, Amen Corner and Chris Farlowe. In their stable, they had a young guitar player and producer by the name of Jimmy Page too. Could a label be any more hip?

Obviously, being a bit tinpot, Immediate ran into financial problems and folded in 1970.

So with that, to celebrate one of the world’s most fabulous and frivolous enterprises, let us listen to some of the famous, and shouldabeenfamous, records that were found on Immediate.

 

 

Fleur De Lys ‘Circles’

Killer mod-pop from FDL, with a track that The Who wrote and intended as a single called ‘Instant Party’. While Townsend & Co. dithered, the Fleur De Lys stuck the record out. It contains one of the most mental lead guitar lines in the history of pop.

 

 

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Posted: 20th, August 2014 | In: Key Posts, Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


In Praise of The Monkees: The Brilliant Top 10 They Never Play On The Radio

PA 12926796 In Praise of The Monkees: The Brilliant Top 10 They Never Play On The Radio

31/12/1965

 

ON this very day in 1968, the last episode of The Monkees TV show aired in the States. Almost every US TV station re-ran the show, with the ’69-’71 being more popular than the debut bow.

The show was shipped out across the world and The Monkees found a load of British fans when it was repeated in the summer holidays in the ’80s and ’90s. While the band themselves have mixed feelings about the show, it simply won’t go away, unless of course, you’re the kind of sneering prick who doesn’t like The Monkees because you could see the business behind them.

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Posted: 20th, August 2014 | In: Key Posts, Music | Comments (3) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Woodstock’s 45th Anniversary: The Great Bands That Turned It Down

PA 8675166 Woodstocks 45th Anniversary: The Great Bands That Turned It Down

Rock music fans relax during a break in the entertainment at the Woodstock Music and Arts Fair in Bethel, N.Y., on Aug. 16, 1969. (AP Photo)

 

FORTY-FIVE years ago, the Woodstock Festival kicked off. Not the first of it’s kind and certainly not the best – but most iconic? Probably.

500,000 gathered on Max Yasgur’s farm in New York’s Sullivan County, and that weekend in August 1969, the the “3 Days of Peace & Music” was captured on film and a legend was born.

Days after the first man set foot on the moon and in the middle of the Vietnam war, optimism, hate and politics all melded together with pop culture.

On the bill that weekend, were Sly & The Family Stone, Joe Cocker, the Grateful Dead, Richie Havens, Joan Baez, Santana, Janis Joplin, The Who, Jefferson Airplane, Jimi Hendrix and more.

However, the line-up at Woodstock could’ve been very, very different. There were a number of bands who were asked and turned it down. There were bands who never really considered it.

So let us look at some of the acts that could’ve been at Woodstock and you can weigh-up how brilliant or awful it would have been to have them alongside the other groups. We’ve chosen footage that is from around the time of Woodstock, so you can get a real feel for what the bands could’ve added (or subtracted) from those that appeared.

 

 

Led Zeppelin

Zep’s manager Peter Grant stated: “We were asked to do Woodstock and Atlantic were very keen, and so was our U.S. promoter, Frank Barsalona. I said no because at Woodstock we’d have just been another band on the bill.” Zep went and watched Elvis instead.

 

 

 

Bob Dylan

Dylan lived in Woodstock at the time, but didn’t enter serious negotiations to play as he was setting off to do the Isle of Wight festival instead, travelling on the QE2. Dylan was also apparently annoyed at the hippies hanging around his house. Thank god The Band were there.

 

 

 

The Beatles/John Lennon

There’s some rumours that the Woodstock organisers asked Lennon to play, but lost interest in the Beatle when he demanded that Yoko Ono get a slot too. However, what is far more likely is that Lennon fancied a slot, but Richard Nixon wouldn’t let him as he was madly paranoid about Lennon being in the States.

 

 

 

Arthur Lee and Love

Arthur Lee declined the invitation thanks to him and his band basically fighting with each other all the time. Love’s appearance would’ve made the band a household name and given their masterpiece – ‘Forever Changes’ – a chance to be a household name. Alas, they were consigned to record-collector obscurity.

 

 

 

Joni Mitchell

Joni was all set to play Woodstock and indeed, wrote a great song about the place. However, she cancelled her appearance on her manager’s advice who thought she’d be better off playing her scheduled appearance on The Dick Cavett Show.

 

 

 

The Jeff Beck Group

Jeff Beck said of Woodstock: “I deliberately broke the group up before Woodstock. I didn’t want it to be preserved.”

 

 

 

The Doors

The Doors cancelled their Woodstock gig at the last minute, because they thought the festival would be a “second class repeat of Monterey Pop Festival”. They spared a generation of Jim Morrison’s dreadful lizard routine.

 

 

 

Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention

It has always been weird that Zappa wasn’t at Woodstock, seeing as he presided over 60s counterculture like some mad professor, but on a TV show, Zappa said: “A lot of mud at Woodstock … We were invited to play there, we turned it down.”

 

 

 

The Byrds

The Byrds were, of course, invited to play Yasgur’s farm, but declined the offer because they figured Woodstock would be no different from any of the other music festivals that summer. There were money concerns as well because, as you know, hippies like to get paid and it looked like McGuinn & Co might not, so they stayed away.

 

 

 

Chicago

Still known as the Chicago Transit Authority, the band had been signed-on to play Woodstock, but thanks to contractual wranglings, Santana got their slot instead. That’s got to be a kick in the teeth.

 

 

 

Tommy James and the Shondells

Declining the invitation, Tommy James said: “We could have just kicked ourselves. We were in Hawaii, and my secretary called and said, ‘Yeah, listen, there’s this pig farmer in upstate New York that wants you to play in his field.’ That’s how it was put to me. So we passed, and we realized what we’d missed a couple of days later.”

 

 

 

Free

Free were asked to play, but declined.

 

 

 

Spirit

Spirit, and the dazzlingly talented Randy California, were asked to play Woodstock, but turned it down because they had already been booked to play some other shows. They had no idea what they were turning down.

 

 

 

Jethro Tull

Jethro Tull turned down Woodstock. Frontman Ian Anderson said he knew it would be huge, but didn’t fancy it because he didn’t like hippies and thought they wouldn’t get paid enough.

 

 

 

Iron Butterfly

IB were booked to appear and are even listed on the Woodstock poster to play on the Sunday, but sadly, they missed their show because they were stuck at an airport. That’s gotta suck.

 

Posted: 18th, August 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


10 Actors Who Swapped The Boards for the Bandstand

 10 Actors Who Swapped The Boards for the Bandstand

 

PART Kermit, part hipster, Michael Cera is loved by many (and he probably irritates a fair few too, but that’s normal) and has starred in a bunch of films that make people in Converse Chuck Taylor’s go weak at the knees.

So it isn’t very surprising that Michael Cera has released folk album called ‘True That’.

The actor released the material on August 8th via his Bandcamp page. Not many people noticed it, but then, Superbad co-star Jonah Hill posted a link to it and now everyone is cooing and clucking about it.

Of course, he’s not the first actor to have a go at singing and making music. In fact, the movies are filled with actors who have decided to have a go at making sweet melodies. The results, obviously, have been mixed and sometimes, downright baffling.

Mostly though, they’ve been a bit bland. Remember Minnie Driver’s album? Of course you don’t. Was it bad? Sadly, it was competent so no-one could get mad.

Some actors have been pretty good, but they’re no fun – we’re interested in the weird ones. Dudley Moore’s fine jazz and J-Lo’s ace pop aren’t for us.

We’re here for the lousy and oddball.

 

 

Robert Mitchum

Cinema legend Robert Mitchum was swept away by the infectious music of the Caribbean and thought he’d make a calypso album. His deadpan delivery is funny, but is it a bit racist doing what is tantamount to a comedy black voice? Judge for yourself.

 

 

 

Scott Baio

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Posted: 14th, August 2014 | In: Key Posts, Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Marianne Faithful Knows Who Killed Jim Morrison

PA 2375070 Marianne Faithful Knows Who Killed Jim Morrison

Lead singer of The Rolling Stones Mick Jagger and British pop singer Marianne Faithfull are shown leaving home in Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, England on May 29, 1969. They are driving to their hearing at Marlborough St. Court on charges of drug possession. (AP Photo)

 

LOOKEE here: Marianne Faithful must have a new album coming out. For the aging diva has decided to drop the bombshell that she knows who killed Jim Morrison. Nothing like a bit of gossip from 40 years ago to revive interest in a singer from 40 years ago, eh?

Marianne Faithfull, the singer and actress, has claimed her drug dealing ex-boyfriend “killed” Jim Morrison after accidentally supplying him heroin that was too strong.

Faithfull, who has a new album out in September, told a music magazine she was now the only person alive “connected” to Morrison’s death, after travelling to Paris in 1971.

The truth being that we’ve all known all along who killed Jim Morrison. It was, of course, Jim Morrison. The combination of the drugs, the booze and the food (yes, don’t forget that he was by no means that svelte figure by the time he died) meant that he simply wasn’t long for this world even at the age of 27. Not unless he’d made a determined effort to clean up his act.

Which brings us to the subject of that 27 club, the young stars who manage to kill themselves at that age. Winehouse, Cobain , Morrison, Joplin and so on. One way of looking at the membership of that club is that perhaps it’s not all that wise for an 18 or 19 year old to have access to vast amounts of money and thus anything and everything that can be inhaled, ingested, drunk or injected. Another way of looking at it is that it does seem to take some years, 5 or 6 perhaps, of that lifestyle to actually kill people. And these people really were going at it full tilt too, which shows us that the human body might be a bit more resilient than we generally assume that it is. It takes years of it to do you in, not the odd dabble.

Posted: 14th, August 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Police Brutality: Music Against Cops

PA 13830581 Police Brutality: Music Against Cops

FILE – This file photo of Rodney King was taken three days after his videotaped beating in Los Angeles on March 6, 1991. King, the black motorist whose 1991 videotaped beating by Los Angeles police officers was the touchstone for one of the most destructive race riots in the nation’s history, has died, his publicist said Sunday, June 17, 2012. He was 47. (AP Photo/Pool, File)

 

ANOTHER young black man has been killed by the police in America and there’s the all too familiar narrative to it all.

Vigils, pleas to be heard and unrest has ensued after Michael Brown was shot dead by a police officer in Ferguson. Eye-witnesses have likened the killing to an execution and the policeman in question has been put on paid leave while officials investigate.

Of course, the list of people killed in controversial circumstances by US police forces is depressingly long and, of course, pop-culture has tracked and chronicled what’s happened.

With that, let us listen to some of the most effective tracks about police brutality – some famous, some less so, and spare a thought for those who have been affected by the state killing their children.

 

 

Public Enemy ’911 Is A Joke’

Public Enemy are the most successful group to align politics and music together. In ’911 Is A Joke’, they expertly detail just how they the can’t trust law and order in America. A lot of things said by PE, even though the message is 20+ years old, are still appallingly true.

 

 

 

Hip Hop For Respect ‘A Tree Never Grown’

In February 1999, 23-year-old Guinean immigrant Amadou Diallo was shot to death by four NYPD police officers after the wallet he withdrew from his jacket was mistaken for a gun. The officers involved were acquitted. A veritable supergroup of black musicians (including Mos Def and Talib Kweli) got together for ‘Hip Hop For Respect’, and in blue-collar rock, Bruce Springsteen recorded American Skins (41 Shots) for the same cause.

 

 

 

Black Flag ‘Police Story’

Black Flag have always had a problem with the police and in ’81, the hit out at the authorities with this one-inch-punch of noise.

 

 

 

NWA ‘Fuck Tha Police’

NWA were never going to shy away from taking on the long arm of the law. The song foresaw the mass resentment towards the police that later exploded in the LA Riots in 1992 after the death of Rodney King. NWA even alleged that black people in the police were worse than the whites: “Don’t let it be a black and a white one ’cause they’ll slam ya down to the street top – black police showing out for the white cop”

 

 

 

Dave Goodman & Friends ‘Justifiable Homicide’

Dave Goodman was the sound man for the Sex Pistols’ earliest recordings. However, Goodman put together a band and released ‘Justifiable Homicide’, which protested against the killing of 39-year-old Liddle Towers by British police. After arrest, Towers spent a night in jail where he was brutalised by police to the point where his injuries killed him. An inquest into the incident determined Towers’ death as “justifiable homicide.”

 

 

 

Bodycount ‘Cop Killer’

Ice T’s ‘Bodycount’ did not mince their feelings about the police. Looking at police brutality, Ice T tells a story of someone who can take it no more, and does something themselves. President Bush, Tipper Gore and Dan Quayle were unsurprisingly horrified at the song.

 

 

 

The Hates ‘LA Riots’

The Hates said of their song: “I wrote “L.A. Riot” after the Rodney King debacle and the resulting aftermath. It seemed incredible to me at the time that police brutality could even exist. We as people are supposed to be better than that. Even more incredible was the police trial. Justice seemed blind and it felt as if we had no power against a group who are supposed to protect and serve but end up using their authority to take their frustrations out on others. The riots after the police trial made me feel like we were all living in a Mad Max world.”

 

Posted: 12th, August 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Michael Jackson: Taught Bubbles To Throw Poo At His Neverland Ranch

PA 1251035 Michael Jackson: Taught Bubbles To Throw Poo At His Neverland Ranch

 

THERE’S a maid who worked at Michael Jackson’s Neverland Ranch and – you’d think she’d have barrowloads of amazing anecdotes from her job wouldn’t you?

Just think of the amazing music that would’ve been made in their presence! Think of the wonderful and fun pop-cultural artefacts owned by The King Of Pop.

Instead, this maid has come out and said that Michael Jackson was “the dirtiest, most unsanitary person in Hollywood.”

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Posted: 11th, August 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


6 Weird And Fabulous Items Of Band Merchandise

TODAY, the world’s press heard about Britney Spears launching a new lingerie line, which just so happens to be called The Intimate Collection.

She announced this by posting a picture of her herself wearing the new range on Instagram. And she looked perfectly lovely in it.

Britter’s range will hit the shelves Stateside on September 9th and Europeans will either have to learn how to use the internet to buy things from abroad, or wait a few days and buy in European shops on September 26th.

That’s not the story though. It got us thinking about band merchandise – not everyone can be classy enough to release a range of tasteful undercrackers.

Most bands don’t veer too far away from t-shirts and mugs, but some go a bit mental. Tenacious D had a specially designated cum-rag fercryinoutloud.

So with that, shall we have a look at some of the weirdest (and therefore best) bits of band merch ever? Feel free to add you own in the comments.

 

 

Rammstein Dildo Box

Rammstein released a box-set with a load of dildos in it and, of course, they decided to base the sex toys on their own junk. That’s nice isn’t it?

rammsteindildobox 6 Weird And Fabulous Items Of Band Merchandise

 

 

Prodigy Toilet Cover Seat

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Posted: 24th, July 2014 | In: Key Posts, Music, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Nu Psych: The new age of psychedelic music

BELIEVE it or not, there’s a new age of psychedelic music upon us. Not so much the re-dawning of the age of Aquarius, but rather, a bunch of snotty brats all making experimental pop-music without the need to badger you about some awful political cause.

This is music made to frazzle your brains, rattle your eyes and shake your arse.

And it isn’t just ’60s revivalism either – these bands have managed to capture the ’60s counter culture’s lightning in a bottle, but mixed it up with meths and cough syrup, to make music that can veer wildly from inyerface hooligan garage rock, to Super 8 sunshine jangly pop, to cosmic prog-pop.

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Posted: 24th, July 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


FrancaisOK: The brilliant and popular music of France

WHAT is France famous for?

Well, the French are well known for amazing food and booze, not to mention being some of the finest smokers on the planet. They’re great at art house cinema, having sexy accents and as the Tour De France has shown (see? Topical), some of the most incredible countryside on the planet.

However, often derided is French music. France, we’re told, is rubbish when it comes to making tunes. Ha ha! Says the world. The FRENCH? Pop music? SHUTTUP!

France has been making some of the best, funnest music on the planet for years! Novelty records and holiday camp europop isn’t solely what France is about, so with that, let us look at some of the greatest French music ever produced over the years.

C’est une musique à nos oreilles!

Daft Punk

So, you know all about the robots and that, when they show up, we have a good summer. They control dancefloors just like they control the weather. Here is one of their earlier efforts.

Camille

Ace singer-songwriter Camille is definitely someone you need in your life. She makes music out of her own body parts and it sounds like brilliant pop and not at all like Bobby McFerrin.

Stereolab

Cult favourites, Stereolab, create a special kind of hush around people of a certain age. They mixed together space-age cocktail jazz, French library electronics (more on that later) and arch 60s pop to make for one of the most wonderful bands who ever lived.

Serge Gainsbourg

Listen. Serge is more that That Song With The Orgasm In It. SG is a proper genius and madman and France rightly honoured his death with a national day of mourning. Here’s a cut from his utterly sublime ‘Melody Nelson’ LP, which saw Serge teaming up with another French powerhouse, Jean Claude Vannier.

Phoenix

Without anyone noticing, Phoenix became one of the biggest bands in the whole world, headlining festivals and generally conquering the world. Former bandmates of Daft Punk (they were in a band together called ‘Darlin”), they’ve applied their wry take on the world to some of the most gorgeous pop-rock music ever recorded.

Jacques Dutronc

Dutronc was one of France’s first pop heroes, cutting a suave, cheeky figure in the 60s. He was a bigwig at Vogues Disques (arguably France’s greatest record label), wrote songs for others, was a mean actor and Francoise Hardy liked him enough to marry him. Jacques Dutronc may not be a household name outside of French speaking countries, but that’s the fault of the rest of the world.

Les Plastiscines

A new wave of garage punk/ye ye groups exploded around Paris which were known as ‘les bébés rockers’. Les Plastiscines were one of a number of bands that appeared on the excellent ‘Paris Calling’ compilation. Soon, they’d release their debut ‘LP1′ and they never looked back.

Michel Polnareff

Another one of France’s first pop-stars, Polnareff tried his hands at loads of different styles, but his most classy joint is the incredible instro ‘Voyages’.

The Hellboys 

Another of the les bébés rockers, The Hellboys were greasy, leopard print garage punk straight out of the dirty daydreams of The Cramps and Link Wray. Sadly, the lead singer Nikola Acin (a very interesting man worth looking up) died aged just 34 years old.

Cecil Leuter

Britain has the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. France had people like Cecil Leuter to test the limits of early electronics and synthesizers. Some of his music is eerie and spacey… others, like the one below, is unhinged bubbling synth funk. The best bit? His real name was Roger Roger. Leuter, along with other French Library music makers helped to shape pop the world over by showing what was possible with electronic music.

Air

Air took over the world with ‘Moon Safari’ with their retro-futuristic take on pop music. They continued slightly under the radar, by including prog and doing film soundtracks… but they’re still brilliant.

Klub Des Loosers

French hip hop usually means people lazily linking to MC Solaar. Of course, MC Solaar is great, but seeing as he’s guested on Missy Elliot records, he doesn’t need further promotion. So here we are, with Klub Des Loosers, who really should give you the bug to find more French rap.

Mr Oizo

You may remember Oizo as being that guy who gave the world Flat Eric with the Levi’s ad which included ‘Flat Beat’. However, Oizo is one of the most innovative, ferocious music producers on the planet. Check out the incredible, jarring, cut and paste jackhammer that is ‘halfanedit’.

Missed out your favourite French song or band? You know where the comments are.

Posted: 22nd, July 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Listen To David Bowie’s Isolated Vocals for Ziggy Stardust

 

WHO wants to hear David Bowie’s isolated vocals for Ziggy Stardust?  We do. And you should, too. 

 

 

Spotter: Brain Pickings

Posted: 17th, July 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The Beatles Tour De Force: Ron Howard Pipes Them Live and Direct To The Masses

beatles The Beatles Tour De Force: Ron Howard Pipes Them Live and Direct To The Masses

 

 

MOSTLY, The Beatles are not a live band.

Sure, they cut their teeth around Britain and Germany for years, before blowing everyone’s brains out in Australia, Japan and America, but when people think of the Fabs, it is all about the studio.

We’ve seen endless documentaries with George Martin talking about ‘the boys’ and the madcap studio ideas they had (Lennon wanted to be swung from the ceiling, trying to recreate the sound of a thousand monks of a hillside, slice tapes and throwing them in the air to stick them back together again, and all that great stuff), but on film, their live prowess has been somewhat neglected.

 

 

Liverpool Empire 1965

 

 

And now, Ron Howard –  a long term Beatle nut and Academy Award-winning director, has been tasked to direct and produce an authorised, as-yet-untitled documentary about the touring years of the Fab Four.

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Posted: 16th, July 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The BBC Defends Black Music Critcism… And Quite Right Too

RECENTLY, the BBC rated the most influential artists in Radio 1Xtra’s Power List. The “UK’s leading black music station” (their words) gave the top honour to Ed Sheeran, who you might recognise as being absolutely not-black and not really making black music.

Wiley, number 16 in the poll, went nuts, accusing Auntie Beeb of representing a “backwards” music industry in Britain. “We influence a man and all of a sudden it turns he has influenced us… Lol,” he wrote.

That’s called Columbusing.

 

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Posted: 15th, July 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Kidrock: The Best, Worst And Most Confusing Youthful Hits And Misses

unlocking the truth Kidrock: The Best, Worst And Most Confusing Youthful Hits And Misses

 

 

WHEN you think of children being in bands, you immediately think of the Jackson 5 or Hanson. They’re slick, pro-outfits that have been tutored and taught within an inch of their lives.

That’s not to say they’re bad in any way, but they’re basically making music by adults, aimed at kids. The youthful joy is there, but what about the abandon and awkwardness which makes children such a fascinating prospect?

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Posted: 15th, July 2014 | In: Key Posts, Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Your favourite rock star is probably about to die

WE’RE getting to a special time in rock ‘n’ roll where the pantheon of Peter Pans is looking more mortal than ever. The music of the babyboomers is finally creaking with age.

Lennon, Joplin, Redding and Gaye all had the decency to die young, thereby making them immortal. The babyboomers did not feel worried. We’re the rock ‘n’ roll generation! That’s exactly the kind of exciting thing that happens to us! I HOPE I DIE BEFORE I GET OLD, MAN! Just like Keith Moon! Just like Brian Jones!

All the while, the rest of rock ‘n’ roll survived and got old. Just For Men, Facelifts and increasingly younger partners plastered over the cracks in the wall.

Then everyone started dying of old age.

Initially, Syd Barrett and Arthur Lee left and the babyboomers (and their kids) all felt bad, but brushed it all off with “well, they had a pretty crazy life! It was always going to catch up with them at some point! Shine on you crazy diamonds!”

And now everyone is dropping like flies. The sheer volume of dying rockstars over the past decade has been astonishing. Not a week goes by without someone tweeting RIP to one of their favourite musicians dying. They’re all in the 60s and 70s now. They’re old. There’s no escaping it.

This week, Ramones drummer Tommy Ramone shrugged off his mortal coil, leaving zero original Ramones left. Even punk is getting old. No-one is safe.

Of course, there’s a good number of rockstar legends knocking around the circuit, such as Mick ‘n’ Keef, Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder, but there’s something gnawing at the back of fans’ brains about their idols.

They’re nearly dead.

This weekend, fans in the UK watched Neil Young roll back the years. The sad fact is, that is statistically likely to be the last time they see him in person. Neil Young may have said that it is better to burn out than fade away, but fade away he will – he’s not got long left.

The babyboomers are going to watch every single one of their idols die. The Woodstock Generation… the Mods… the dadrockers… for the first time in their lives, they’re faced with the very real possibility of every single thing they like turning into compost before their eyes. And with them will go their own youth.

We’re in the middle of rock music’s retirement, with only bands like The Black Keys, Jack White and Arctic Monkeys still clinging on to the old fashioned idea of ‘rock ‘n’ roll’ to be played in huge stadiums, revering the blues.

This all sounds desperately negative, but if you want to cherish these acts, do it now. Watch their final flings and roll around in nostalgia because, like it or not, the people who invented the teenager, the people that shaped what popular music could achieve, are all this close to joining the choir invisible.

Magazine will beatify these men and women, but soon, they’ll stop being in the present, and soon become very much of the past. And that, for the true spirit of rock ‘n’ roll, is incredibly exciting indeed.

Posted: 14th, July 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The Real Problem With Musician’s Tax Avoidance

 

 

PA 12766495 The Real Problem With Musicians Tax Avoidance

 

THERE’S quite the kerfuffle in musicville, after it turned out that a number of wealthy musicians were ferreting their money away in tax avoidance schemes.

Lazy people are vomiting into their hands about how awful it all is, while even lazier fans of said bands are saying “CUH! LIKE YOU WOULDN’T AVOID TAX IF YOU COULD!”, despite the fact most people can’t, don’t and wouldn’t.

All four members of Arctic Monkeys, George Michael, Gary Barlow, Katie Melua have been named as hiding their millions from HMRC.

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Posted: 12th, July 2014 | In: Celebrities, Music | Comment (1) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The Ultimate Tour De France Playlist

kraftwerk The Ultimate Tour De France Playlist

 

WITH the Tour De France in full swing, nearly killing riders with wet cobbles and craft ale enthusiasts thrilling at the warring riders like teenage Hollyoaks fans, it got us thinking about cycling music.

Of course, the great music to cycle to is anything Kosmiche from Germany. Neu! albums are pretty much designed to sound like streamlined engineering, powered by human muscle.

However, we’re not talking about the things you’d listen to while powering your pedals (besides, you might not want to ride around with earbuds in, for fear of being hit by a combine harvester or something), but rather, the songs dedicated to those that cycle and the magnificent machines themselves!

There’s surprisingly few songs about bikes (seeing as they’ve been around for so much longer than cars and planes, which have endless ditties in their honour), but we’ve waded through them, missed off ‘Daisy Bell’ and the terrible Red Hot Chilli Peppers and Katie Melua numbers, and found some gems!

Have a listen and do add your own in the comments.

 

 

 

Tomorrow ‘My White Bicycle’

Ace British psychedelic band, Tomorrow, made one album and saw their guitarist running off to form Yes. However, while they were around, they made this tribute to the free bicycle movement that took place in Holland in the ’60s. Please note the cute bell ringing sound effect.

 

 

 

 

Kraftwerk ‘Tour De France’

The greatest tribute to cycling comes from Kraftwerk, and Ralf und Florian are total and utter cycling nuts. During one Manchester show at the Velodrome, when they played ‘Tour De France’, the Team GB cyclists appeared and everyone got a bit emotional.

 

 

 

 

Pink Floyd ‘Bike’

The Syd-era of The Floyd loved whimsy with an edge. They took mundane things and made them B-movie. ‘Gnome’ should be nice and it isn’t and, likewise, ‘Bike’ is a pleasant ditty with a knife between its teeth. Please don’t ride a bike with a machete in your gob, thanks.

 

 

 

 

Tom Waits ‘Broken Bicycles’

Rainsoaked Tom wouldn’t write a song about a perfectly functional working bicycle he’d just bought for loads of money from Evans, which leaves us with this dollop of pathos.

 

 

 

 

Junior Reid ‘Poor Man Transportation’

Junior Reid is one of the finest voices in reggae and provides this lovely paean to the prole’s best vehicle.

 

 

 

 

Vivian Stanshall ‘Terry Keeps His Clips On’

When Stanshall wasn’t causing mayhem in the Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, he was… well… causing havoc all by himself. And here, we have the wonderful nonsense of ‘Terry Keeps His Clips On’.

 

 

 

 

Deerhoof ‘Midnight Bicycle Mystery’

One of the more unusual bike songs, but that’s Deerhoof in a nutshell. They’re mental. And we should cheer from the rooftops about bands like this because we need their shade in the light of commercial rock.

 

 

 

 

Ballboy ‘Olympic Cyclist’

This song does exactly what it says on the tin and is wonderful for it.

 

 

 

 

Livingston Taylor ‘Bicycle’

This is the most straightforward bicycle song in music history, even down to the cutely dull description of what his helmet is made of.

 

 

 

 

The Bouncing Souls ‘BMX Song’

Bicycle songs aren’t all commuting and aerodynamism – The Bouncing Souls were all about popping wheelies and buying bikes that are less practical and more fun.

 

 

 

 

Julie Doiron ‘When The Breaks Get Wet’

A lovely, plaintive song which paints a picture of riding through drizzle. A wonderful snapshot.

 

 

 

 

Dukes of the Stratosphear ‘Bike Ride To The Moon’

Neo-psychists, Dukes of the Stratosphear were XTC in disguise where they got to play with the dressing up box. Here, they ape Floyd and take a bike ride to the moon. Worth checking those guys out.

 

Posted: 12th, July 2014 | In: Music, Sports | Comment (1) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Insane Clown Posse’s FBI lawsuit is laughed out of town

THE Insane Clown Posse are an odd bunch. For starters, they think magnets are powered by witchcraft or something. And their fans? Well, their fans are VERY devoted (seriously – they make fans of The Smiths look like rational, reasonable people without a worrying neediness that burps out of their every pore).

As such, the ICP and their Juggalos are well known.

They’re so well known that the FBI started sniffing around them. Were Juggalos violent and mental and doing all manner of criminal stuff. Probably, but only as much as any group of people who come under any bracket are able or willing to engage in criminal activity.

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Posted: 10th, July 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


See Andre 3000 as Jimi Hendrix in All Is By My Side Trailer

PA 2089552 See Andre 3000 as Jimi Hendrix in All Is By My Side Trailer

 

ROCK biopics are always fun, even if they’re not always good. There’s been mixed movies, from The Runaways to The Doors, from Ray to What We Do Is Secret. Even the crappy ones are still worth a look because, even if the storytelling and acting is lousy, at least the music will be great.

And so, we’re looking down the barrel of a Jimi Hendrix biopic and there’s a lot riding on it.

Why? Well, Hendrix was a smooth, fascinating character with a preposterous talent and a gentle soul – that’s not easy to capture. Moreover, Outkast’s brilliant Andre 3000/Benjamin is playing the title role. There’s no-one on Earth who wants this to fail.

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Posted: 8th, July 2014 | In: Film, Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


REVEALED: The Music Behind The Worst Album Art In The World

bad album cover 7 REVEALED: The Music Behind The Worst Album Art In The World

 

LESS than ten years ago, bad album covers suddenly became a “thing”. Sure, there had always been people like me: longtime vinyl enthusiasts who cherished these unholy creations; but, it took the Internet to really generate a widespread appreciation for the “bad album cover”.

So, as the years went on, and collectors far and wide shared their vinyl oddities, a few particularly bad ones rose to the top. To say they went viral would be a stretch; however, it’s safe to say certain albums gained notoriety. Unfortunately, we only had the covers to mock. The actual recordings remained a mystery. You could only imagine what they sounded like, since the owners of these rare gems generally didn’t share the recordings.

But now we have YouTube, where no stone in the vast pop culture landscape gets unturned, no matter how obscure. At last we can not only look, but also listen. So, come along and take a tour through some well-known bad album covers and get a taste for the music they hold. Be prepared: it’s often breathtakingly disappointing….

Read on…

Posted: 7th, July 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0