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Posts Tagged ‘film’

Gender roles: Anything becomes all about the boy

Acting. Isn’t that about pretending to be someone you are not? One writer takes issue with indie movie Anything, staring Matt Bomer:

However, it is not Bomer’s incontestable conventional attractiveness that is setting off alarm bells. It is his off-screen gender and the consistent issue of cis performers playing people of trans experience in film.

Recent years have seen both Jared Leto and Eddie Redmanye win Oscars for their respective trans-woman roles in “The Dallas Buyers Club” and “The Danish Girl”. Chloë Sevigny, Felicity Huffman, Elle Fanning and other notable cis-gender actors have taken on parts that show trans people either during or mid transition. Almost all of these actors have collected praise from the mainstream press for doing so.

Lauding cis actors for delving into trans experiences has long been a Hollywood tradition. The frequency of those plaudits has only more regular more and more films take up the trans narrative at different angles.

Can’t we recruit actors on merit? Non-binary actor Asia Kate Dillon tells the Sunday Times:

“I feel like one thing I encounter is that, particularly with cis men, when they find out I’m non-binary, they don’t know how to be in relation to someone that isn’t something that they understand,”

The paper adds:

And yet, even as more trans stories surface across all media, actual trans actors are often shut out of telling stories that are — in many senses — theirs to tell. It’s a trend that’s been a regular source of criticism and genuine concern.

When Miley Cyrus talked about being gender fluid in 2015, some dismissed it as yet another Hollywood wild-child phase. But Cyrus is hardly alone in identifying this way, joining the likes of teen activist Amandla Stenberg, the Transparent director Jill Soloway, and the model/actor Ruby Rose, who also stars in Orange Is the New Black. The number of gender nonconforming people in the UK is growing and almost half (44%) of a poll by the Fawcett Society last year said they regard gender as more fluid than simply man or woman. Taking their cues from the real-world social discourse, Facebook and Tinder now offer dozens of gender identities.

For those still confused, this is how Dillon put it on The Ellen DeGeneres Show in March: “Sex is between our legs, gender identity is between our ears.”

So what are you? And what are you dating?

Posted: 15th, June 2017 | In: Film | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Minions toy body wash will give your kids nightmares

minions death


The Minions 3-in-1 bodywash does not do what it says on the tin: it will not cause your child’s eyes to bleed. Probably.

Spotter: Ash Warner

Posted: 29th, August 2015 | In: Reviews, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Oh. A Superhero Film Written by Arctic Monkeys and Miles Kane



HERE’S a thing.

Arctic Monkeys frontdude Alex Turner, and Rascals pal Miles Kane, have stopped work on their Last Shadow Puppets careers to concentrate on… wait for it… a superhero film.

This is a joke, right?

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Posted: 3rd, July 2014 | In: Music | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Mötley Crüe Goes ‘Triple R’: The Best Bits From The Hot Mess Film

Mötley Crüe


IF there’s one thing you can say about Mötley Crüe, is that their band name is a total pain in the arse to type on a computer, if you want to do it correctly.

Of course, there’s more to Mötley Crüe than that – they’re a hilarious hot-mess too.

It goes without saying that not everyone likes their music. However, as court jesters of rock ‘n’ roll, you can’t help but feel pleased they’re around. Media training is something that passed them all by and, in their day, they were rich, badly behaved and thick as pigshit – everything you’d want from a celebrity.

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Posted: 20th, May 2014 | In: Film, Music | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Their Last Known Photograph: Five Found-Footage Horror Movies That Deserve a Second Look



THE found-footage horror film genre is one that isn’t often appreciated. The late Roger Ebert himself once wrote that movies of this type often consist of “low quality home video footage,” are “usually under-lit,” are “lacking in pacing” and seem “intentionally hard to comprehend.”

Indeed, there seems to be the pervasive misconception that a found-footage horror movie is somehow easy to shoot and produce. You don’t need a star, for example, or much of a budget either, to make such a film. You don’t even need expensive equipment.

All an intrepid film crew needs is a good concept, and a whole lot of shakin.’

None of this is true.

A good found-footage horror film — while cut-off in large part from the elegance, structure, and language of traditional film grammar — nonetheless has its merits.

For one thing, found-footage films ramp-up the experiential or immersing aspects of the genre. The hand-held camera-work provokes a brand of immediacy and urgency that other horror sub-genres can’t necessarily emulate.

Horror movies in general concern situations that are impossible to escape, set in isolated locations.  The found-footage genre runs with this idea, landing its stars in frightening landscapes and then charting a kind of pressure-cooker intensity as terror boils over.

For another thing, the compositions in found-footage films must appear spontaneous and on-the-fly, all while simultaneously capturing crucial action. This balancing act requires quite a bit of legerdemain.

A unique development of cinema-verite documentary techniques, the found-footage horror film thus requires patient preparation of shots, split-second timing, long takes, and a certain brand of non-theatrical or “naturalistic” performance that not every actor can easily master.

The overt critical dislike and disregard for the found-footage genre reminds me very much of the critical hand-wringing that occurred in the 1980s over the slasher movie formula, or in the mid-2000s over so-called “torture porn.”

Basically, movie critics are always finding some reason to object to horror’s latest trend, even as audiences are ahead of the curve, and excavating reasons to appreciate the new format.

In short, a good found-footage film — such as the genre’s classic, The Blair Witch Project (1999) — isn’t just a case of point-and-run film-making. In The Blair Witch, for instance, artistry can be detected in the escalation of the film’s throat-tightening terror, and there is even a clever sub-text about the camera operating as a “filter” that occludes reality.

The found-footage film genre has many undisputed highs, from [REC] (2007) to Trollhunter (2008), but the five found-footage horror films featured below have generally been dismissed by critics, even though they possess abundant virtues not necessarily associated with this derided sub-genre.





1. Apollo 18 (2011)

You know your movie has been poorly received when it is the butt of a joke in another found-footage horror movie (Grave Encounters 2 [2012]).

But reception aside, Apollo 18 boasts a value that found-footage movies aren’t supposed to reflect: excellent production design.

The movie is actually a period piece, set in 1972, during the last days of NASA’s Apollo program.  The film concerns a failed space mission to the moon, and the discovery of terrible creatures on the lunar surface.

In this case, tremendous attention has been paid to making certain that the film’s sets and wardrobes are appropriate and correct to the disco decade epoch.  The film grain is right too, and the result is that Apollo 18 looks very much like footage of a real space program venture.  The retro (low) tech wonders of the film are actually quite remarkable, from the Lunar Lander interior and astronaut spacesuits to the Rover mock-up.  There is no hint in the visuals that this is modern fakery.

Similarly, if the game of the found-footage movie is to find an inhospitable or dangerous terrain, and then chart the mental and physical disintegration of the characters’ trapped there, then Apollo 18 must represent an apotheosis of sorts.  The whole movie is set on Earth’s moon.  The vast, desolate landscape is recreated ably on a low budget, and viewers understand immediately that this is a realm of a million dangers, and virtually no sanctuary whatsoever.

With convincing mock-ups and locations, Apollo 18 asks its audience to dwell, essentially, in an extended moment of fear and isolation, with no genuine hope of escape.  One touching moment involves an astronaut — knowing he shall never see home again — playing a recording of his wife and son over and over; reaching out for something, anything human and comforting.

Again, critics want to tell you the characters in the film are indistinguishable and you never care about them.  But this scene of human longing and separation puts truth to that lie.





2. Grave Encounters (2011)

Again, this is a found-footage movie that received largely negative reviews, but a positive audience response.  And again, it boasts an intellectual or aesthetic quality that found-footage movies supposedly don’t possess: satirical insight.

In this case, the filmmakers mercilessly and humorously roast reality-TV conventions, and especially those of the Ghost Hunter-type show variety.  In programs of this type, every little cold spot and door squeak is made into a paranormal event of historical proportions.  Accordingly, Grave Encounters involves a team of reality-star wannabes, led by Lance Preston (Sean Rogerson), as these actors investigate a purportedly haunted mental institution.

In short order, the audience sees Lance pay a gardener on the sanitarium grounds twenty-dollars to claim that he’s seen ghosts.  And the group’s psychic, Houston, is worried about possibly missing an important audition.  When Houston goes “big” and suggests that there’s a demonic presence in the asylum, he asks — after the take — if was “too much.”

What Grave Encounters tells audiences is that everything you see on reality TV is phony.

Of course, horror movies must punish those who transgress, and these narcissists in Grave Encounters soon find themselves in a hospital where there is no escape. The asylum seems to rewrite reality itself, and the blasé actors – who have used real life tragedy as the source for their “drama” and stardom – are suddenly faced with a true understanding of madness.

Grave Encounters bucks all the stereotypical criticisms of the found-footage genre, and meaningfully (and scarily…) critiques an aspect of our culture: the quest for fame at all costs.





3. Paranormal Activity 3 (2011)

The best of the durable Paranormal Activity films, Paranormal Activity 3 is simply a superior scare machine.

It features some of the best jump scares in the franchise, and more than that, does so by generating the rare quality of attention, or patience.  Again, critics of the found-footage format want to convince audiences that these films are slap-dash cash grabs that appeal to the lowest-common denominator.  They’re cheap and gimmicky!

If that’s the case, how does one account for a film like Paranormal Activity 3, which possesses long stretches of silence and stillness, and demands engagement on the part of the viewer? Here is a film that instead of rewarding a short attention span, rewards patience.

So much of this sequel’s running time is devoted to a camera panning back and forth in a room, or the quiet recording of apparently vacant areas of a suburban house. This technique not only generates suspense, it encourages one to look closely at absolutely everything, to make a mental snapshot in your head of what item is where, what light is turned on, and what, if anything, is moving in the frame.

In a way, this very technique mirrors how it feels to wake up, sleepily, in the middle of the night (after hearing a noise) and scanning the environs.  Paranormal Activity 3 is all about the potent idea of sleepy twilight, of being awake at 3:15 in the morning, and not quite having an accurate sense of what is going on.  The world is at slumber — or should be — but something insidious lurks just at the edges of perception.

We’ve all experienced this feeling, and can relate to the characters’ situations.





4. V/H/S (2012)

The first found-footage anthology, this omnibus film is a social commentary on the fact that the home video revolution of the 1980s — now thirty years old — has transformed all of us into  directors, actors,  historians, journalists…even porno stars.

Imagine for a moment millions of people possessing home movie tapes, and then imagine what becomes of those tapes after three decades.

In whose hands to they end up? What purpose do they serve? What value do they possess?

V/H/S explore five unsettling genre stories vetted from a first-person perspective, and the wraparound narrative device involves a group of small-time miscreants desperately searching for one particular video tape in the house of a (presumably) dead tape collector.

Several tapes are viewed, and all are recordings of dark, sinister events.  In virtually every situation, the video camera is used to hurt someone: to trick a gullible woman into sex, to record a carefully-plotted murder, to convince a scared girlfriend  not to seek help when something strange starts happening to her, and so forth.

I once called this film “America’s Scariest Home Videos,” but it’s more than that: V/H/S is s chronicle of the weird turn that the home video revolution has taken.

Today, we have cameras on our phones and on our tablets, and we have the capacity to record our entire lives.  But what if we are recording something else too?  What if all the recording technology of the last thirty years is merely creating a tapestry of suffering and inhumanity?  What if we are simply documenting our cruelty?

Again, it’s all too easy to dismiss this film (and its good, 2013 sequel as well…) as a gore-fest, but V/H/S explores – in horrifying fashion – the nexus of modern technology and modern morality.





5. The Devil’s Pass (2013)

This found-footage effort from Renny Harlin starts out as a meticulous exploration of the (still-unsolved) Dyatlov Pass Incident in Russia.  A group of hikers died under mysterious circumstances in 1959, on the so-called “Mountain of Death.”

A film that seems in danger of being a simple Blair Witch Project knock-off, however, instead showcases something else that found-footage  movies are often accused of lacking: imagination.

Before The Devil’s Pass is over, the movie has devised a (crazy…) solution to the real-life mystery, offered up a unified theory of conspiracies and the paranormal, and even had the grace and literacy to wink at Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse 5.   The movie incorporates Indian cave drawings and the Philadelphia Experiment, and ends with an audacious final twist that will leave your jaw agape.

Sure, the actors aren’t great, and the early scenes are clunky, but The Devil’s Pass’s final act runs on pure, unadulterated, gonzo imagination. The movie goes courageously for broke, breaking out of format conventions and generating a lingering horror that lasts long beyond the end credits.




Each one of the aforementioned films is worth watching, and each one puts truth to the lie that the found footage genre is running on empty.

Apollo 18 is an accomplished period piece, Grave Encounters a satire of reality TV culture and ethos, Paranormal Activity 3 a waking dream that requires active participation on the part of the audience, V/H/S a dedicated critique of  our modern technology, and The Devil’s Pass  is the most imaginative and daring horror film to come down the line in quite a while.

Posted: 14th, March 2014 | In: Film, Flashback, Key Posts | Comment (1) | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Stairway To Heaven? Six Genre Movies That Depict The After-Life



THE greatest unanswered question of human life is, paradoxically, about death.

What follows our duration on this mortal coil?

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Posted: 11th, February 2014 | In: Film, Flashback, Key Posts | Comments (2) | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

The Baftas 2014 Nominations Are Announced!


2014’s Bafta film nominations have been announced, which is particularly good news for London’s cocaine dealers as they prep themselves for one of their busiest awards of the year.

Leading the pack is Gravity with 11 nominations and true stories dominate the main categories (which probably means all our fiction writers are either rubbish or they’ve given up through a lack of funding) with all but two films (Gravity and The Selfish Giant) falling into that pocket.

It’ll be a good night for Dame Judi Dench too. She’s got a nod for Philomena, which gives her a whopping total of 15 Bafta film nominations – the most nominated actress in the history of the event.

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Posted: 8th, January 2014 | In: Film, TV & Radio | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

5 Inconceivably Awkward 80s Movie Moments


Andrea Howard and Don Adams in the Inconceivably Awkward film The Nude Bomb

BEFORE we carry on with the list, let’s define what we’re talking about here.  “Inconceivably Awkward” simply means it contains both of the following qualities:

  1. It is so terrifyingly uncomfortable you instinctively flinch as if you’ve been punched squarely in the genitals.
  2. It is so unimaginably awful you question whether the director suffered head trauma and should seek medical attention.

I should also mention that this isn’t a “top five” list as there’s plenty worse out there.  These are just five scenes (plus a runner-up) which spring instantly to mind when thinking of the worst of the worst.

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Posted: 7th, January 2014 | In: Film, Flashback, Key Posts | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Julian Assange nearly makes Benedict Cumberbatch quit film, says leaked email


NOT a man known for attracting attention to himself, Julian Assange apparently refused to meet Benedict Cumberbatch while he was preparing to play the WikiLeaks founder for a film… and amusingly, it is a leaked email that has revealed this news.

In the letter, sent in January, Assange described Cumberbatch’s film, The Fifth Estate, as “toxic” and “distorted“, adding that the actor should “reconsider your involvement in this enterprise”.

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Posted: 10th, October 2013 | In: Celebrities, Film | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Third Bridget Jones novel to have monumental character death


REMEMBER Bridget Jones and her big knickers, kissing and vague alcoholism? Well, she’s due a new book called ‘Mad About The Boy’ which will look at the now 51 year-old Bridget, only with one notable absence in her life.


Helen Fielding has announced that she has decided to kill off Mark Darcy, the man played by Colin Firth in the flicks, leaving our Isn’t She Just Like Us? heroine massively widowed.

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Posted: 1st, October 2013 | In: Books | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

The 1982 Blade Runner convention reel

One of the Blade Runner Convention Reels featuring interviews with Ridley Scott, Syd Mead and Douglas Trumbull about making Blade Runner universe. This 16 mm featurette, made by M. K. Productions in 1982, is specifically designed to circulate through the country’s various horror, fantasy and science fiction conventions.

BLADE RUNNER is one of my all-time favourite films. The director’s cut is even better. Future Noir:

One of the Blade Runner Convention Reels featuring interviews with Ridley Scott, Syd Mead and Douglas Trumbull about making Blade Runner universe. This 16 mm featurette, made by M. K. Productions in 1982, is specifically designed to circulate through the country’s various horror, fantasy and science fiction conventions.

Posted: 3rd, July 2013 | In: Film, Flashback | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Psycho slashed: Alfred Hitchcock’s classic in 24 seconds, 60 seconds and 11seconds

psycho shower

DOUGLAS Gordon’s version of Psycho last 24 hours. Alfred Hitchcock’s classic film also inspired Chris Bors to adapt the movie. He compacted the action into 24 seconds:

24 Second Psycho appropriates the entire Alfred Hitchcock moviePsycho and condenses it into twenty-four seconds. Tweaking the concept of artist Douglas Gordons 24 Hour Psycho, where Hitchcocks masterpiece was slowed-down to a crawl, here the process is reversed to accommodate society’s increasingly short attention span. Seeing Hitchcocks most lasting contribution to cinema flash before your eyes in a matter of seconds represents our new information age where culture is packaged for easy consumption at a breakneck pace.

But could the film be show faster? Yes. All hail Joe Frese’s  Sixty Second Psycho:

Maybe it can all be surmised in an 11-second gif?

psycho gif


Posted: 1st, July 2013 | In: Film | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

21 Movie Barcodes – classic films in a single image

MOVIE Barcode compresses all the frames of a movie into a single picture. Can you tell the films apart? Yes. If you look hard enough what at first appeared specious, gets to be intriguing. Those aren’t swatches of 1970s raffia wallpaper. Those are films. 


When Harry Met Sally
movie bar codes

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Posted: 29th, June 2013 | In: Film | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Russell Crowe has filmed a real UFO outside his office in Woolloomooloo (and fruit bats)

The Next Three Days Screening - Los Angeles

IF we’re being honest with ourselves, actors seem a bit mental don’t they? They don’t work very often and they’re the most paranoid people on Earth. Their imaginations run wild and they end up acting oddly in public.

And so, to Russell Crowe who has posted a video on YouTube which he claims shows a UFO passing by his office window in Sydney.

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Posted: 6th, March 2013 | In: Celebrities, Strange But True | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Emma Stone pretends to be flattered at creepy declaration of love from Jim Carrey

CELEBRITIES, as you know, are thoroughly mental. The more famous they become, the weirder they get. Take Jim Carrey for example. For some inexplicable reason, he decided to take to YouTube and declare his love for actress Emma Stone.

In the clip, he said that he wanted to have “chubby little freckle-faced kids” with her, adding: “Emma, I think you’re all the way beautiful. Not just pretty, but smart and kind-hearted. And if I were a lot younger, I would marry you,” Carrey said in the video.

“Every day, for the rest of your life, you would thank God that I was the appropriate age for you. But I’m not. I’m 49. I have lines of my face, sometimes a little gray in my heard, and it takes me a little bit longer to pee than it used to,” he said.

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Posted: 21st, June 2012 | In: Celebrities | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

James Bond is nothing but a beer-swilling sell-out

YOU may think James Bond is a suave, sophisticated man. That’s probably because he drives expensive sports cars, travels in luxury, always has a nice watch on and is the epitome of tailored cool. Right?

You couldn’t be more wrong.

You see, Ol’ Bondy is ditching his famous Martini in favour of being a loutish, beer swigging, burping sell-out. That’s right. No long will Bond be asking for his cocktail ‘shaken, not stirred’ because he’ll be too busy crushing beer cans on his head and howling at football matches (what team does Bond support anyway?).

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Posted: 24th, May 2012 | In: Film | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Naomi Watts to star in car crash biopic of Lady Di

SHE was the Queen Of Some Of Our Hearts! That’s right – Princess Diana or Lady Di – was a much loved woman, despite the fact she’d dole out doe-eyed to starving children while wearing thousands of pounds worth of clothing. She offered very little to the world, but everyone agreed that she was too pretty to be marrying Prince ‘Extreme Wealth’ Charles.

When she died, most of the world was shocked and then moved on. However, there was a strong grief-tourist following who could never quite let go of England’s Rose.

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Posted: 10th, February 2012 | In: Celebrities | Comment (1) | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Hurray! Anchorman 2 Is Scrapped!

ANCHORMAN. It’s about as funny as watching an orphanage burn down. Disagree all you want because if you like Anchorman, you’re opinion on humour isn’t worth listening to. Hell, you shouldn’t even be trusted with the air you breathe.


And so, the good news. Star of Anchorman, Will Ferrell, has confirmed that plans for a sequel have been shelved. Ron Burgundy has told Sky News that Paramount Pictures don’t want to make a follow up.

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Posted: 14th, October 2011 | In: Film | Comments (2) | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Phoenix Nights To Shout Garlic Bread Pointlessly At You From The Silver Screen, Potentially

GARLIC BREAD! Hahaha! Garlic bread, of course, is the food that made everyone from outside of Bolton, believe that everyone from inside of Bolton thought it was the most glamorous, exotic thing they’d seen since the town was awarded a microwaveable chicken korma.

And now, Peter Kay is to potentially wheel out Phoenix Nights for everyone again, this time, on the big-screen.

It appears that Kay has already written the script and is currently looking at offers from film producers. Of course, the baffling success of the dreadful Inbetweeners movie hasn’t done any harm to Kay’s pitches.

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Posted: 16th, September 2011 | In: TV & Radio | Comment (1) | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Marilyn Monroe Film Opens In New York, Reminding Us All That She Was Pretty Fit

PRETTY much everyone on Earth has lusted after Marilyn Monroe at some point. It’s actually become a law that you have to have sexual thoughts about her, even if you have absolutely no interest in the female form.

And now, we’ll get the chance to remember how attractive she was as a film about the late actress’s time in England in 1956 is to premiere at the New York Film Festival.

My Week With Marilyn tells the tale of a brief encounter between Monroe and a set assistant while she was filming The Prince and the Showgirl with Laurence Olivier. Monroe will be played by the also fancied Michelle Williams. Kenneth Branagh star as Olivier to keep our arousal in check.

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Posted: 8th, August 2011 | In: Film | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Lea Michele Thinks Her Nose Will Take Lead Role In Glee Movie

HEY everyone! There’s going to be a Glee movie out this summer! How amazing is that? Not very? Well aren’t you a bunch of spoilsports?! In fairness, you’re spoilsports that are absolutely bang-on-the-money, but still, you could at least fake excitement for those dribbling idiots you know who can’t live without some Glee in their life.

That’s right. There are people who actively seek out television shows filled with grinning Americans performing thousand-part harmonies while dancing around with all the sex appeal of a hat stand.

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Posted: 6th, May 2011 | In: TV & Radio | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Kent Students Filming Death Scene Find Dead Body

WHILE shooting a death scene for their project,  film undergraduates from Canterbury Christ Church University found a real dead body at Botany Bay in Broadstairs.

Says student Dave Larke, 48:

“It was a bit freaky to say the least. Our actress looked up and saw a bloke pulling something out of the sea, then she suddenly realised it was a dead body. We went over to see if the guy was all right with it because we could see he was having trouble with his phone. And just to make sure that we weren’t wrong in what we had seen. I was probably a foot away from it at the closest point, which wasn’t nice at all.”

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Posted: 21st, March 2011 | In: Strange But True | Comment (1) | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

When Ninja Vaginas Attack: Video

IN this scene from Female Ninjas: The Magic Chronicles, the heroine delivers Vagina Bubbles From Hell.

You think your vagina’s talented, Lady Gaga? Pah! You can’t handle a really talented nunny…

Via: Dangerous Minds

Posted: 20th, September 2010 | In: Celebrities | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Leonardo DiCaprio And Marion Cotillard Giggle At Inception Premiere: Pictures

ELLEN Ellen Page, Leonardo DiCaprio and Marion Cotillard trod the carpet for the World Premiere of Inception, at the Odeon Leicester Square in central London. DiCaprio plays Cobb, a futuristic agent who seeks to implant an idea and save the day. It’s  a chance to get DiCaprio out of his linen shirts and shorts into a Bond-style suit. It works.

“A devilishly complicated, fiendishly enjoyable sci-fi voyage across a dreamscape that is thoroughly compelling. In a summer of remakes, reboots and sequels comes Inception, easily the most original movie idea in age” –  Hollywood Reporter, Kirk Honeycut

Leo DiCaprio Inception

Picture 1 of 9

Actor Leonardo DiCaprio arriving for the World Premiere of Inception, at the Odeon Leicester Square in central London.

Posted: 9th, July 2010 | In: Celebrities | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Avatar Is Now Even longer: Spoiler Alert

HANDS up who wants to see a longer version of James Cameron’s Avatar flick? Rumours are it is to come with free DVDs of Escape To The Country Uncut; Lord’s Prayer Deliverance – a BBC3 show in which teenaged wannabe vicars read the Lord’s Prayer with emphasis on different words in the manner of Trevor McDonald reading THE news; and EastEnders.

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Posted: 8th, July 2010 | In: Celebrities | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0