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Posts Tagged ‘journalists’

How Journalism Has Changed: The Hack’s Hangover

THE New York Times writes on the best ways to treat a hangover. Hacks and booze. This shold be insightful. And – boy – it i. Says Iain Gately:

In order to minimize the emotional damage hangovers can cause I, personally, practice a form of aversion therapy. If I know I’m going to a place or an event where temptation will be hard to resist, I read one of my favorite descriptions of drunkenness or its consequences beforehand, so that when euphoria catches hold there’s a voice in the back of my head telling me to go steady. I can recommend “The Ship Captains’ Medical Guide,” Clement of Alexandria’s “The Pedagogia,” Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Black Cat,” Tom Wolfe’s “The Bonfire of the Vanities” and Kingsley Amis’s “Lucky Jim,” for their stomach-turning portraits of the effects of too much hooch.

Yeah, hacks now get drunk vicariously. They write about what didn’t happen. Anyoen else think the old media isn’t f***ed?


Posted: 21st, December 2008 | In: Reviews | Comment (1) | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0

Teaching Tabloid Journalism And Other Superstitions In Ghana

IN Africa the journalists are preoccupied with politics and superstition:

Mr. Saeed Yakubu, News Editor of Luv FM, a Kumasi-based radio station, noted that many radio stations employed untrained journalists and radio presenters…

He urged the students to be circumspect in their writing, when they come out, to avoid any legal suits.

Saeed made reference to a research conducted by the Media Commission, which revealed that radio stations in Kumasi devoted 70% of their airtime to politics and superstition, and advised the students to desist from such practices, by devoting equal attention to all the sectors that would help move Ghana forward.

Politics. Superstition. Which will be first British tabloid to publish in Africa..?

Posted: 14th, September 2008 | In: Strange But True | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0