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Posts Tagged ‘Klu Klux Klan’

The South Carolina Klu Klux Klan Nazi mash-up: the farty tuba walk

The South Carolina Klux Klux Klan Nazi mash-up protest has a theme song.

Tke it away, super sousaphonist, Matt Buck and the farty Ride of the Valkyries:

 

 

Spotter: DM

Posted: 21st, July 2015 | In: Reviews | Comment


When Stetson Kennedy, Mr. Ayak and Superman smashed the KKK

Stetson Kennedy KKK

 

On Flashbak the story of Stetson Kennedy, the campaigning journalist who infiltrated the Klu Klux Klan in the 1940s and exposed their members to ridicule. He didn’t do it alone. He got Superman to help…

Read it all here.

 

 

Posted: 13th, March 2015 | In: Reviews | Comment


In 1958 the Lumbee Indians introduced the KKK into the gun debate

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IN 1958, the Lumbee Indians faced down the Ku Klux Klan:

The rally was scheduled for the night of January 18, 1958, in a field near Maxton, N.C. The stated purpose of the gathering was, in the words of Catfish Cole, “to put the Indians in their place, to end race mixing.” The time and location of the rally was not kept secret, and word spread quickly among the local Lumbee population.

Reports vary about the number of people gathered on that cold night, but there were thought to have been around a hundred Klan members. They brought a large banner emblazoned with “KKK” and a portable generator, which powered a public address system and a single bare light bulb. When the meeting began, the arc of the dim light didn’t spread far enough for the Klansmen to see that they were surrounded by as many as a thousand Lumbees. Several young tribe members, some of whom were armed, closed on the Klan meeting and tried to take down the light bulb. The groups fought, and a shotgun blast shattered the light. In the sudden darkness, the Lumbees descended upon the field, yelling and firing guns into the air, scattering the overmatched Klansmen. Some left under police protection while others, including Catfish Cole, simply took to the woods.

Captured banner worn by Charlie Warriax and Simeon Oxendine, Lumbee.From Life Magazine, the captured banner worn by two Lumbee Indians, Charlie Warriax and Simeon Oxendine.News photographers already on the scene captured the celebration. Images of triumphant Lumbees holding up the abandoned KKK banner were published in newspapers and magazines throughout the world. Simeon Oxendine, a popular World War II veteran, appeared in Life Magazine, smiling and wrapped in the banner. The rout of the Klan galvanized the Lumbee community. The Ku Klux Klan was active in North Carolina into the 1960s, but they never held another public meeting in Robeson County.

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Posted: 22nd, September 2013 | In: Flashback | Comment


The story of the Klu Klux Klan in pictures: racism, civil rights and murder

THE Klu Klux Klan was once powerful. The Far Right, anti-immigration, anti-Catholic, anti-black, anti-Jew, anti-anything not white and Protestant and lately pro-Nazi group  has been a fixture of the US political lanscape ever since it was founded in 1865.

This is a history of its members and those who opposed its racism in photos. The captions are of their time:


Ku Klux Klan members parade past the U.S. Treasury building in Washington, D.C. in 1925. (AP Photo)

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Posted: 10th, December 2012 | In: Flashback, Key Posts | Comments (3)


KKK Says Westboro Baptist Church Too Extreme

NEWS is that the KKK thinks the Westboro Church too extreme. The Church that picketed Heath Ledger’s funeral, spotted Lady GaGa in Beelzxebub’s merkin, that sang God Hates the World, that’s banned in the UK, that loves the Jews, that rejoiced over Natasha Richardson’s death is too nasty for the KKK.

As it says on the Klu Klux Klan website, the Westboro Baptist Church is too extreme and we “absolutely repudiate their activities”.

“The Ku Klux Klan LLC has not or EVER will have ANY connection with the Westboro Baptist Church. We absolutely repudiate their activities.”

Posted: 9th, April 2010 | In: Strange But True | Comment