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The Consumer Category

We bring you the chic and unique, the best and most bizarre shopping offers both online and offline. We offer you tips on where to buy, and some of the less mainstream and crazy, individual and offbeat items on the internet. Anything that can be bought and sold can be featured here. And we love showcasing the best and worst art and design.

Bulge like Michaelangelo’s David in these optical illusion pants

Stuck for a gift? Well, unstick yourself. These yoga pants and swimming trunks  shorts are a snip.

 

shorts michelangelo trunks david

 

 

 

Spoter: BB

Posted: 21st, November 2017 | In: Fashion, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Paperchase must ban all Daily Mail suspects from its stores

Paperchase is “truly sorry” for speaking to Daily Mail readers, offering them two free rolls of wrapping paper in Saturday’s newspaper. Stop Funding Hate, the group that hates the Daily Mail and its pressie-wrapping readers, promising without irony to “tackle the culture of hate, demonisation and division that is poisoning our political discourse”, encouraged tweeters to complain, just as it did when Lego advertised in the Mail. Lego responded by vowing never again to advertise in the popular tabloid. One minute you’re a Danish-based company selling plastic figurines to children; the next you’re a force for moral good. Life moves pretty fast when your in the censor’s crosshairs.

Stop Funding Hate spotted the Paperchase promotion in the Mail and opined: “After a torrid few weeks of divisive stories about trans people, is a Daily Mail promotion what customers want to see from @FromPaperchase?” Paperchase, of course, laughed this off, arguing that pricey envelopes and novelty pens should be available to all people, even those who only send emails. No, of course not. It said: “We now know we were wrong to do this – we’re truly sorry and we won’t ever do it again. Thanks for telling us what you really think and we apologise if we have let you down on this one. Lesson learnt.”

With any luck, all ‘responsible’ advertisers will pull their ads and the Daily Mail will be much reduced, existing on a sponsorship of Nazi memorabilia, cricket bats and Downton Abbey merchandise before dying with their last reader’s final breath.

 

paperchase cards daily mail

‘For her’ – pink and flowers

 

paperchase cards daily mail

‘For him’ – the skies the limit and here’s to spoting success

 

Not far enough, of course. Paperchase, which as you can see from the images above, thinks nothing of supporting arcane gender stereotypes, disappointing we who look it for guidance on all manner of pressing issues (such as: when does Christmas shopping begin? when are 2018 diaries discounted?; is there life after death?) needs to do more. Sam White suggests: “Paperchase, not good enough. You should question people wishing to enter your stores as to whether they have ever handled or looked at a Daily Mail. Those who have can be refused entry, or possibly sent for re-education.”

And there’s a card for everything, even the Untermensch:

 

paperchase brexit

Paperchase – not fan of Brexit

 

When you see a card declaring ‘Intolerance will not be tolerated’, you know where to send it…

Posted: 21st, November 2017 | In: News, Tabloids, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Win Copies of The Celestial Archive Advent Calendar

 

Fancy something smart and beautiful this Christmas? We’re giving away two copies of the terrific Celestial Advent Calendar.

Conceived , compiled and designed by Stephen Ellcock and Hugh Hales-Tooke, the Celestial Archive Advent calendar follows the format of a traditional Advent calendar with 24 numbered doors, but the images are a celebration of the celestial rather than religious or other typical yuletide imagery.

WIN one of two copies by following our sister site Flashbak on twitter – using the hashtag #celestialadventcalendar.

The calendar features a selection of pre-space age images of the heavens by artists, illustrators, astronomers, scientists, mystics and visionaries, spanning several centuries and many cultures and iconographic traditions.

The windows in the cover open to reveal celestial images printed on translucent paper, which, held up to the light, produce something like a stained glass window effect.

Buy The Celestial Archive Advent Calendar HERE.

Or WIN one of two copies by following our sister site Flashbak on twitter – using the hashtag #celestialadventcalendar.

Posted: 20th, November 2017 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Schools ban glitter to save the planet but the human virus lives on

To the Tops Day Nurseries, which all 19 branches have banned the 3,000 children they care for from using…glitter. Tops’ MD Cheryl Hadland says the glitter is harming the planet.

“We did a survey a few months ago and 86% of our parents want us to be eco-sustainable,” says Hadland. “I think a lot of our parents really want us to do this.”

Those are the parent who drop their children off at the daycare centre in cars, right? And do any of these children have siblings or pets? Are we not all the human virus? Shouldn’t we all be sterilized? Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn opined:

“Humans represent the most obscene, perverted, cruel, uncivilised and lethal species ever to inhabit the planet and [we look] forward to the day when the inevitable asteroid slams into the earth and wipes them out, thus giving nature the opportunity to start again”

Of course, this is just glitter. It’s not as if people are trying to ban skirts, playing, mum’s lunchcrayons, glue, marking, tackling, blazers, the school run, words and sausage rolls.

If children want an eco-friendly alternative to glitter, they can always try mixing snot with dandruff.

Posted: 18th, November 2017 | In: News, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Barbie gets an hijab in accordance with ‘diversity’

barbie hijab

 

There’s to be a Barbie doll based on US Olympic fencer Ibtihaj Muhammad, who became the first women who wear an hijab at the Olympics. According to Mattel, Muhammad is a “Shero”, which is bit like being a hero but for women; like heroine, yes, but the kind of portmanteau that makes for better branding and makes women a special case. So much for equality.

Sejal Shah Miller, Barbie’s vice president of global marketing, guffs out a statement: “Ibtihaj is an inspiration to countless girls who never saw themselves represented, and by honoring her story, we hope this doll reminds them that they can be and do anything,” It’s less about her than it is about us, say Mattel.

And as for girls’ ambitions, well they can’t do anything. NBC says Muhammad got into fencing because her mother likes the cover-all kit. “My mom just so happened to discover fencing,” says Muhammad on CNN. “She was driving past a local high school and saw kids with what she thought was like a helmet and like long pants and long jacket. She was like, ‘I don’t know what it is, but I want you to try it.”

So you can do anything, so long as you cover up. And don’t do it in Iran,where as one toy seller opined: “I think every Barbie doll is more harmful than an American missile.”

Whatever the backstory, the athlete is delighted, saying being immortalised in plastic is a “childhood dream come true”:

 

 

Cynics might argue that Mattel needs to broaden its appeal, and what easier way than by tapping into a new market, albeit the relatively small one of female Muslim fencers. CNN Money notes: “Barbie has been working hard to make its collection of dolls more diverse in an effort to broaden the brand’s appeal… Barbie’s sales have slumped, down 6% in the most recent quarter compared to last year.”

 

 

More people as dolls here. Each one an inspiration…

 

Posted: 15th, November 2017 | In: News, Sports, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The Beautiful Poetry of Donald Trump: Ode to 45

The Beautiful Poetry of Donald Trump

 

Donald Trump’s poetry is composite blend of Tweets, speeches and interviews  edited by Rob Sears, who notes the “little known alternative fact that the 45th President, Donald J. Trump, has long been a remarkable poet.”
The Beautiful Poetry of Donald Trump considers Trump “a modern-day Basho or Larkin” with smaller hands.

The greatest misapprehension about DJT corrected by this volume, however, may be the idea that he sees money and power as ends in themselves. In fact, just as Wilfred Owen turned his wartime experiences into poetry, and Slyvia Plath found the dark beauty in her own depression, Trump is able to transform his unique experiences of being a winner into 24-karat verse. He didn’t build a huge real-estate empire for the billions; he did it so he could write poems…

Highlights:

I won!

Well, we’ve had some disasters, but this is the worst

Bad hombres

I’ve known some bad dudes
I’ve been at parties
They want to do serious harm
I’ve seen and I’ve watched things like with guns
I know a lot of tough guys but they’re not smart
We’re dealing with people like animals

But they are the folks I like the best—by far!

I am the least racist person there is

I’ve always had a great relationship with the blacks
I remained strong for Tiger Woods during his difficult
period
Oprah, I love Oprah. Oprah would always be my first choice
Kanye West—I love him
I think Eminem is fantastic, and most people think I
wouldn’t like Eminem
And did you know my name is in more black songs than any
other name in hip-hop?
You are the racist, not I

I respect women, I love women, I cherish women

Vagina is expensive
No more apologies—take the offensive!

Hot little girl in high school

I’m a very compassionate person (with a very high IQ)
Just think, in a couple of years I’ll be dating you
It must be a pretty picture, you dropping to your knees
Come here, I’ll show how life works. Please.

We’ve got to stop the stupid

You know what uranium is, right?
It’s a thing called nuclear weapons and other things like lots
of things that are done with uranium including some bad
things
I have to explain this to these people, they don’t even understand basic
physics, basic mathematics, whatever you call it
I mean, they’re like stupid

Look at the way I’ve been treated lately

I should have been TIME Magazine’s Person of the Year
Just like I should have gotten the Emmy for The Apprentice
I should have easily won the Trump University case
I should have won New York state but I didn’t
I unfairly get audited by the I.R.S. almost every
single year
No politician in history—and I say this with great surety—
has been treated worse or more unfairly

Spotter: The Beautiful Poetry of Donald Trump , Dangerous Minds

Posted: 13th, November 2017 | In: Books, Politicians | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


This Heinz Stranger Things ketchup bottle top is brilliant

heinz stranger things ketchup

 

Spotter: Adam The Creator

Posted: 9th, November 2017 | In: The Consumer, TV & Radio | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


What happens when you tap on a shark screen that say ‘don’t tap on the shark screen’

 

Sharks get a tough run with humanity, whether it being fins made into soup, teeth worn as necklaces or the cultural approbation / plasticface that saw the biggest shark role in Hollywood history played by a machine. At the International Spy Museum in Washington D.C., visitors are advised against tapping on the glass. This is, of course, an invitation to tap on the glass, which one shark feast-sized human did:

The Huffington Post:

The display is part of a museum exhibit called “Earth Redesigned.” The show includes the vision of fictional character Karl Stromberg of the James Bond book and film “The Spy Who Loved Me,” and his ideas about a post-apocalyptic war world beneath the sea.

“What would Stromberg’s world be like?” the museum asks on the display’s webpage. “Find out as you experience the residents in our virtual shark tank … but be careful — you never know when one might attack!”

Wait for it…

Posted: 28th, October 2017 | In: News, Strange But True, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Peter Dahmen’s stunning pop-up books

 

Pop-up books done well are gorgeous. So here’s a peeks at the work of Peter Dahmen and his video Most Satisfying Video of Pop-Up Cards.

 

 

Spotter: The Kid Should See This

Posted: 26th, October 2017 | In: Books, Gifs, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The hipster nativity is a thing of comfort and joy

hipster nativity

 

Nicely done hipster nativity makers. The three wise men ride on Segways bearing gifts from Amazon for the newborn. Mary holds her Starbucks and pouts. She looks more than tad high. Joseph is taking a photo of his own head. The bard has solar heating; the sheep has a jumper; and one of the wise men is sporting a waxed ‘tache.

 

hipster nativity

hipster nativity

 

 Spotter: here

 

Posted: 25th, October 2017 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Amazon delivers 65 pounds of marijuana to couple who ordered a bin

Sometimes life just gives you a break. And so it was for one couple who instead of the four storage bins they ordered from Amazon, received 65 pounds of marijuana.

 

 

“They were extremely heavy, heavier than you would think from ordering four empty bins,” the woman tells ABC.

She called the police, who impounded the contraband, and around a month later Amazon sent them a $150 gift card.

There really is no helping some people.

Spotter: WFTV

Posted: 25th, October 2017 | In: Strange But True, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The meaning of sailors’ tattoos

sailor tattoos decoded

 

Artist Lucy Bellwood explains the meaning of sea-farers’ tattoos with The Art of the Sailor. It first appeared in the Vancouver Maritime Museum’s traveling exhibit, “Tattoos and Scrimshaw: the Art of the Sailor.”

 

 

Spotter: Rusty Blazenhoff,

Posted: 23rd, October 2017 | In: Strange But True, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


A flame-activated edition of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451

 

The Anne Petronille Nypels Lab at Holland’s Van Eyck Academie showcases the work of French graphic design collective Super Terrain. They’ve created a version of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 in heat sensitive ink. At room temperature the book’s text is secreted under a layer of black substance. Heat it up and the words are revealed.

 

Ray Bradbury’s classic Fahrenheit 451

 

Spotter: Open Culture, Flashbak

 

Posted: 22nd, October 2017 | In: Books, Technology, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Organic farming wastes resources and what about the animals?

We should all care where meat comes from. Poor animal welfare shames us all. Writing in the Guardian, George Monbiot has an idea:

One study in Britain suggests that, if we stopped using animal products, everyone in Britain could be fed on just 3m of our 18.5m hectares of current farmland (or on 7m hectares if all our farming were organic).

Organic is wasteful, then, right? And if we stop using animal product, where does the fertiliser for organic come from?

The study Monbiot cites is in the Land Magazine. You can read it there, and then know that according to the Soil Association, “Organic means…no manufactured herbicides or artificial fertilisers.”

Poo it is, then. We need farm animals. But we can all agree they must be well treated. Anything less is a curse on our age.

 

Posted: 21st, October 2017 | In: News, Technology, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The immersive supper club in an authentic Hackney pub costs £55

supper club cockney

 

“Just got a PR email about a Cockney themed immersive supper club in an “authentic Hackney pub”, tweets Tom Armstrong. “It’s £55. This is one of the press shots.”

The pub is Homerton’s The North Star.

And I’m outraged, too, as what the knowing and outraged call ‘Poor Face’. Who smokes fags when you can have a spliff?

As for the event:

The Cockney’tivity is a Christmas dining experience like no other featuring three short acts of hilarious festive drama around three courses of delicious food all based in an authentic east end boozer. Walk through the doors of The North Star, take a seat at the Christmas dinner table and watch as the drama unfolds around you. Culminating in a raucous finale that will have you dancing on your chairs with your hands in the air.

It’s what Jesus would have wanted.

Spotter: @TomDisco

Posted: 20th, October 2017 | In: News, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Sam Malvaney’s lovely Museum of Bad Taste

New Orleans-based collector Sam Malvaney takes us on a  tour of his well-decorated home in the city’s French Quarter. Welcome to the “Museum of Bad Taste”

 

 

Spotter: David M. Jones

Posted: 19th, October 2017 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Jamie Oliver’s sugar tax pushes lazy eaters to fruit juices

Jamie Oliver has fiddled with food every since Tony Blair realised the chef was popular on the telly and grabbed him for a conflab. Oliver has been raging against sugar for some time now. But signs are that it’s not working:

Jamie Oliver’s 10p tax on sugary drinks sold in his Italian restaurants has resulted in a significant drop in sales, a study has found.

Oliver gathers up all the 10ps and invests them in “food education and water fountains in schools”. He’s a food colonialist teaching the slack-jawed and sugar-toothed how to drink from a standpipe and worry about food. Sod the toque blanche and get the lad a pith helmet.

Now the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health tells us that sugar-sweetened drinks flogged in Jamie’s Italian-style eateries fell 11% in the first 12 weeks of the levy. At the end of six months, sales were 9.3% lower than before the tax was brought in.

The odd bit is that fruit juice sales were up 22 per cent – you know, those pricey drinks packed full of sugar.

The study, however, does not tell us how Jamie’s faux Italian outlets have fared as a whole over that period. I did have the misfortune to visit Jamie’s Italian at Gatwick Airport just the other week, and can reveal that his cooked breakfast (‘The Full Monty’) was greasy, unsatisfying, badly presented (it came on an oily skillet), mean (3 nasty little mushrooms; two splats of cherry tomatoes; a drool of beans; two undercooked sausages; innersole bacon; charred squares of potato; missing onions; a dry slice of black pudding; and poached eggs that were well cooked but trimmed to the size of tic-tacs) and expensive (£10.25).

Professor Susan Jebb of University of Oxford tells the Times, Jamie’s experiment was “encouraging news for public health ahead of the introduction of the soft drink industry levy”.

Oh, and this:

Jamie Oliver is to close six of his Italian restaurants after tough trading and the “pressures and unknowns” following the Brexit vote.

Oliver intends to close Jamie’s Italian restaurants in Aberdeen, Exeter, Cheltenham, Richmond, Tunbridge Wells and Ludgate Hill, near London’s St Paul’s Cathedral, by the end of the first quarter of the year.

Blame Brexit, then. Easy.

Posted: 18th, October 2017 | In: Celebrities, Key Posts, News, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Young girl shows friends her prosthetic leg for the first time

 

Get a load of Anu, 7, showing her new sports blade and prosthetic leg to her friends at school in Birmingham.

Heartwarming stuff.

Isn’t humanity great…

Posted: 17th, October 2017 | In: Strange But True, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Going fast: the Anne Frank Halloween costume for girls

Why not alarm your Nazi neighbours this Halloween by dressing up in an Anne Frank costume (for girls)?

 

halloween costume gils anne frank

 

 

The costume has now been pulled from shelves.

Public Relations Specialist at Fun.com, Ross Walker Smith went on Twitter to explain:

“We sell costumes not only for Halloween, but for many uses outside of the Halloween season, such as school projects and plays. We have passed along the feedback regarding this costume, and it has been removed from the website at this time.”

Just a clerical error, then. Thanks for the feedback. Who knew flogging a murdered child for Halloween was anything by fun?

And it’s positively tasteful compared to this:

 

 

Spotter: JudeHabib

Posted: 16th, October 2017 | In: News, Strange But True, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Censorship means Alabama shoppers buy sex toys blind

If you buy an online sex toy online in Alabama, you’ll have to do so blind. You get to see a fair deal of the ‘marital aid’, but the gaps have been plugged.

 

 

Alabama law prohibits selling products that are “primarily for the stimulation of human genital organs”.  This is down to  “the state’s interest in preserving and promoting public morality provides a rational basis for the challenged statute.”

So there.

 

 

 

Spotter: JWZ

Posted: 7th, October 2017 | In: Strange But True, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Nestlé does not pay nothing for bottling water

You mugs drinking water for ‘hydration’ deserve all you can get. Fruit and vegetable juice are the drink of choice for the health conscious, especially when they’re rebranded as cider, wine and beer. And now via Bloomberg more news to chill water drinkers:

Nestlé Makes Billions Bottling Water It Pays Nearly Nothing For

True enough that the water flows freely

But as Tim Worstall notes, it’s not still free when it arrives at your table or sports bag:

So, let’s consider that other essential for life, oxygen. Say you’re in hospital, and need an extra supply. The people who stuck that compressed oxygen into that bottle and transported it to where you need it not to die. They got it for free! Just sucked it out of the common atmosphere they did!

 

The story is, of course, that bottled water is for idiots. But you can buy what you like. You choice. In 2009, we read that “wine is now cheaper than water”. In 2015, Meurig Raymond told BBC Radio 4’s Today that “milk… is now cheaper than water”.Surely he meant milk was cheaper than bottled water, some of which retails at £80 a litre.

 

Posted: 21st, September 2017 | In: News, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0