Anorak

Books | Anorak - Part 11

Books Category

The latest books and literature reviews, comment, features and interviews, with extracts from famous texts and neglected gems.

Seeing adults reading Harry Potter, Twilight and The Hunger Games makes my blood boil

DO grown up people who read Harry Potter, The Hunger Games or Twilight upset you? Does seeing them reading the books on the train or bus wind you up? Do you clack your tongue and think them idiots?

C.S. Lewis took a view:

“Critics who treat ‘adult’ as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development.

“When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”

Do you agree?

Image via

Posted: 12th, April 2012 | In: Books | Comments (18) | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


10 books with terrible titles to read before you die laughing

TEN Books to read before you die laughing features such titles as Invisible Dick, Fancy Coffins to Make Yourself, Hitler: Neither Vegetarian nor Animal Lover and Castration – Advantages and Disadvantages…

invisible-dick

Posted: 2nd, April 2012 | In: Books, Key Posts | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Book of the Day: Glamour and the Hostess: A Guide to Canadian Table Settings

BOOK of the Day: Glamour and the Hostess: A Guide to Canadian Table Settings -by Marie Holmes, Director Chatelaine Institute —in the Original GIFT BOX. With chapters on “The Formal Tea” and “The Tea Tray”. A reader asks: “Should I have my silver flatware monogrammed? And , if so, what initials should I use, those of my married name or my maiden name?” Another wonders: “When do you use coffee spoons?” With this guide, your worries are at an end:




Spotter: EBay

Posted: 21st, March 2012 | In: Books | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Book of The Day: Cooking With Poo

BOOK of the Day: Cooking with POO.

In Thailand, Saiyuud Diwong’s book “Cooking with Poo” is a hit. In Thai “poo” means “crab”, For reasons unspecified, Poo is also Diwong’s nickname.

It’s funny how one word can mean something so different in another language or time. For instance, in 14th Century Albanian, Jamie Oliver is a ‘gonad tongue’, a “term of endearment”.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted: 4th, March 2012 | In: Books, Key Posts | Comments (4) | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Children’s Book Of The Week: A Guide To Bottoms

JON Klassen’s book I Want My Hat Back, Adam Mansbach’s guide to f**king good parenting and now…the children’s guide to bottoms and what goes out of them. (For a guide to what goes in them, see here.)

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted: 14th, December 2011 | In: Books | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


James Oliver’s Great Britain Was Made In…Germany

JAMIE Oliver’s latest Great British book about Great British food called Jamie’s Great Britain – taking in a Great British TV show – and priced in Great British pounds was printed in…Germany!

Posted: 26th, November 2011 | In: Books | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Jonathan King’s Autobiography 65 My Life So Far Defies Censorship

I AM  delighted to see that Jonathan King’s autobiography 65 My Life So Far hit No1 on the Amazon Kindle pop culture chart. This is amazing given the near-universal attempt to edit our tastes by our nation’s media by ignoring the intriguing tome. Thanks to Madame Arcati’s review and that of Roger Lewis’ in The Lady, however, and a little PR by the author himself, and… well, success!

You don’t have to be signed up to the JK Fan Club to appreciate his priceless anecdotes about bisexual John Lennon and sooo many other stars he worked and (well) hung out with. Despite the BBC’s best efforts to delete him from public record there’s no denying his huge contribution to pop culture, for better or worse.

The Madame’s review:

Oh, JK! How could you? Or rather, how could you not?

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted: 30th, September 2011 | In: Books | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0