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The Consumer | Anorak - Part 60

The Consumer Category

We bring you the chic and unique, the best and most bizarre shopping offers both online and offline. We offer you tips on where to buy, and some of the less mainstream and crazy, individual and offbeat items on the internet. Anything that can be bought and sold can be featured here. And we love showcasing the best and worst art and design.

Dog face: Tonik the Poodle/Shih Tzu mix has a ‘human’ face

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Posted: 5th, February 2013 | In: Strange But True, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


These photographs will appear on cigarette packaging sold in Ireland

THESE photographs will appear on cigarette packaging sold in Ireland. The key word is that smoking “can” cause a slow death. And it cannot.

Might this be time to dig out that cigarette case?

Ireland was the first EU country to introduce a smoking ban. Did it work? Irish Independent> says href=”http://www.independent.ie/national-news/smoking-rate-soars-up-to-one-third-despite-ban-1923543.html”>not:

Despite hikes in tobacco tax, the smoking ban and a new law against the public display of cigarettes for sale, the number of smokers has steadily risen since 2007 when 29pc of the population smoked. The survey, which was conducted between March and September, revealed the largest group of smokers — 45pc — is aged between 16 and 30.

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Posted: 4th, February 2013 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


That creepy Super Bowl Scientology advert for sports fans and other sectarian egotists

DID you see the advert for the Church of Scientology aired during the Super Bowl? If you heard it, you’re probably reciting the mantras word for word in your sleep and at the bank. If you didn’t, here’s your next tattoo from the starriest self-improvement system in Tinsel Town – the one penned by Ron (that’s a name you can trust):

“To the curious, the inquisitive, the seekers of knowledge. To the ones who just want to know about life, about the universe, about yourself. Not cute questions, big questions, one’s that matter. To the rebels, the artists, the free thinkers and the innovators who care less about labels and more about truth. Who believe non-conformity’s more than a bumper sticker. That knowledge is more than words on a page. You’re young, you’re old, you’re powerful beyond measure and the fuel of that power is not magic or mysticism, but knowledge. The things you see, the things you feel, the things you know to be true. Sure, some will doubt you. Let them. Dare to think for yourself, to look for yourself, to make up your own mind. Because in the eternal debate for answers, the one thing that’s true is what’s true for you.”

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Posted: 4th, February 2013 | In: Sports, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


WIP’s Wing Bowl 21: photos of sporting gluttony

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Posted: 3rd, February 2013 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Jon Venables: Ralph Bulger’s new book sheds light on James Bulger’s killer

THE murder of James Bulger is still news. Ralph Bulger, father of the two-year-old murdered by twn-year-olds Jon Venables and Robert Thompson, has written a book. My James by Ralph Bulger and Rosie Dunn centres on the events of February 12, 1993. The parts about he and wife Denise Ferguson’s unbearable pain are horrible, like being invited to look at survivors’ slides from a fatal car crash. The parts about the child’s body and wounds are grim. They offer nothing new. What is interesting is the story of the criminal case, particularly how Jon Venables comes across: 

‘Is that you on that video, son?’ Ann Thompson demanded. ‘Nah, it’s got nothing to do with me,’ he replied. As if to prove his point, Robert went to a makeshift memorial near the railway in Walton and later took some flowers. When he got home he said to his mother: ‘Why would I take flowers to the baby if I had killed him?’ At another home nearby, Jon Venables told his mother, Susan: ‘If I’d seen them kids hurting the baby, I’d have kicked their heads in.’

Jon’s father, meanwhile, asked his son about the blue paint that was splattered on his mustard-coloured coat. He said that his friend Robert Thompson had thrown it at him.
I later learned that on the Wednesday evening an anonymous woman went to Marsh Lane Police Station. She said she was a friend of the Venables family and knew that the son, a boy called Jon, had skipped school with a friend called Robert Thompson on the Friday that James went missing. He had returned home with blue paint on his jacket.

Jon was having lunch when his mother held her son in a tight embrace and said: ‘I love you, Jon. I want you to tell the truth, whatever it might be.’ He started to cry, and just blurted out: ‘I did kill him.’ The boy looked across the room at the detectives and said: ‘What about his mum? Will you tell her I’m sorry.’ Jon continued to blame everything on Robert. He said they found James outside the butcher’s shop. He said it was his idea to take him, but it was Robert’s idea to kill him. They took him to the canal, where Robert planned to throw him in. James would not kneel down to look at his reflection in the water as they wanted, so Robert picked him up and threw him on the ground. This was how James had first injured his head. He said that James kept crying: ‘I want my mummy.’

‘He wanted him dead, probably,’ he responded. ‘Robert was probably doing it for fun because he was laughing his head off.’ For his part, though, Robert refused to admit any involvement in the attack. ‘He never actually told me the truth in the end – far from it,’ said DS Roberts. ‘He lied from the minute we started to interview him.’ ‘When he was charged, he had no problem with it. I suppose he knew that if he was found guilty he would have a better life than he would outside. I thought to myself, “This boy has caused so much misery and evil.” I didn’t look for the three sixes on the back of his head, but at that moment I thought he was the devil.’

It may oversimplify the arguments, but that to my mind makes them evil beyond belief.

You never do hear much of Robert Thompson…

Posted: 3rd, February 2013 | In: Books, Reviews | Comments (20) | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


1925: the Isolator helmet by Hugo Gernsback

FLASHBACK to 1925:

The Isolator is a bizarre helmet invented in 1925 that encourages focus and concentration by rendering the wearer deaf, piping them full of oxygen, and limiting their vision to a tiny horizontal slit. The Isolator was invented by Hugo Gernsback, editor of Science and Invention magazine, member of “The American Physical Society,” and one of the pioneers of science fiction.

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Posted: 2nd, February 2013 | In: Flashback, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The solid platinum dummy is must for Liverpool mums, like Coleen Rooney

IN readiness for the birth of Coleen Rooney’s child – Mrs Wayne Rooney once tweeted “Stressful nursery run! #jetlag”, leading us to wonder how far the rich got to educate their children – Liverpool jewellers Russell & Case has produced a solid platinum dummy. The dummy weighs more than two hundred and fifty grammes, and is yours for £54,000. Of course, given the experience, it would be any idea to secure the dummy to the child’s ermine babygrow with a something suitable, like a string of pearls or the contents of Mr T’s safe…

Posted: 2nd, February 2013 | In: Celebrities, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


How to use data to get a date

EVER been on a date arranged online? Amy Webb has. Lots of them. She wrote a book about her experiences called Data, A Love Story: How I Gamed Online Dating to Meet My Match. Webb says dating sites fail because they’re “computing our half-truths and aspirational wishes”. We show a highly selective, idealised version of ourselves. Maria Popova reviews:

After a series of bad dates following a major heartbreak, mathematically-driven Amy decided to take a quantitative approach to the playing field and started systematically recording various data points about her dates, revealing some important correlations. After one particularly bad date, she decided to formalize the exercise and wrote down everything that was important to her in a mate — from intellectual overlap to acceptable amount of body hair — eventually coming up with 72 attributes that she was going to demand in any future date. She then broke down these attributes into two tiers and developed a scoring system, assigning specific points to each. For 700 out of a maximum possible 1800, she’d agree to have an email exchange; for 900, she’d go on a date; for 1,500, she’d consider a long-term relationship.

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Posted: 2nd, February 2013 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


RIP Regretsy: Some of the maddest, baddest items sold on etsy

SAD to say that Regretsy, the site that documented the “objects d’fart” for sale on craft site easy? Etsy sells handcrafted and vintage things. Well, so it says. Much of the stuff is good. A lot of it is haunting. And it still sells:

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Posted: 1st, February 2013 | In: Key Posts, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The Electrical Baths of the early 20th Century

THE Electrical Bath would steam your cares away.

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Posted: 31st, January 2013 | In: Flashback, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Volkswagen and Algernon want Super Bowl fans to say OOOOOOKKKKAAAAYYYYYY to Jamaica

FEW things are more entertaining that people looking for offence and finding it in dust. Volkswagen has produced an advert to be screened during the Super Bowl (tip: fast forward to the ads) that features a white Midwesterner expressing his chilled-out lifestyle in a faked Jamaican accent.

USA Today finds the upset:

“It’s pretty horrific,” says Ricki Fairley-Brown, president of the multicultural marketing agency Dove Marketing. “Why do they have a white guy from Minnesota faking a Jamaican accent?”

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Posted: 31st, January 2013 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Dolce & Gabbana’s I Bambini is the smell of babies

DOLCE & Gabbana have opened up new avenues in bottled smells with I bambini or Children, a perfume for kids, adults and pets who want to smell like warm babies. The unisex smell is “designed to cuddle and pamper every little boy and girl”. (Not be drunk without mixers by mums.)

Anorak recalls Patrick Süskind’s book Perfume, in which Jean-Baptiste Grenouille is deemed possessed by the devil because he smells of nothing. In search of the perfect smell, the walking perfume tab happens upon virgins, whom he kills with much inhaling. Finally, he stumbles upon a scent that can end his pain. He sprinkles it over his body, and is ripped to pieces and eaten.

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Posted: 31st, January 2013 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Hominid: X-Ray animation

HOMINID is an animated teaser based on the Hominid series of photo composites by Brian Andrews. The series has been exhibited internationally, including at SIGGRAPH, in the Hong Kong Exhibition Center, and at numerous galleries. This animated teaser was produced at Ex’pression College for Digital Arts. Be on the lookout for future Hominid animations. (When I saw this I kept thinking of Cherie Blair.)

More

Hominid from Brian Andrews on Vimeo.

Posted: 30th, January 2013 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


What is the future for home organs in Norfolk?

WHAT is the future for home organs? Well, it’s funny you ask. Allens Music Centre, of Great Yarmouth in Norfolk, has the answer. The Lowrey organ. It was always the Lowrey. With Allens and the Lowrey, you re in safe company. The chap in the back get to speak (and blink) just after the 4 minute mark:

Spotter: @thedeadflowers, via Popper

Posted: 30th, January 2013 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Anti-drone Stealth Wear: the anti-conformist hoodie

ADAM Harvey has designed anti-drone Stealth Wear. Hoodies are useless, says Harvey:

Conformity is what surveillance wants and fashion is anti-conformist. And I think the decision to conform or not happens on a personal level. The projects I’ve been working on act upon surveillance in a way that exploits a vulnerability and makes this vulnerability accessible through using something ordinary (hair, makeup, or fashion) in a non-conformist and legal way.

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Posted: 29th, January 2013 | In: Fashion | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


How to grow a human baby from an egg (photos)

EVER wondered what a human baby would look like if it wer grown from an egg? Right now in Hollywood, you just know this is being trialled. No scarring! No stretch marks! No need to eat! Just add water and watch junior hatch. (PS – tastes great with toast!):

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Posted: 29th, January 2013 | In: The Consumer | Comment (1) | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Specsavers mock Chelea’s Eden Hazard for ballboy incident

WHEN Eden Hazard kicked a ballboy in the ribs, it was… and let us all be perfectly clear on this… really funny. No-one got hurt, both looked like berks and, coupled with all the giant-killings that have gone on this week, made for the most interesting week of football in aeons!

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Posted: 28th, January 2013 | In: Sports, The Consumer | Comment (1) | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Your terrible client comments are now posters

IRISH graphic designers Mark Shanley and Paddy Treacy took their “favorite worst feedback” and turned into posters.

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Posted: 28th, January 2013 | In: The Consumer | Comment (1) | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


How Las Vegas casinos show Britons the future of CCTV

TED Whiting is director of surveillance at Las Vegas’s Aria casino in Vegas. The control room works like London: everyone is observed in a hunt for the cheats:

Despite that, Whiting says facial recognition software hasn’t been of much use to him. It’s simply too unreliable when it comes to spotting people on the move, in crowds, and under variable lighting. Instead, he and his team rely on pictures shared from other casinos, as well as through the Biometrica and Griffin databases. (The Griffin database, which contains pictures and descriptions of various undesirables, used to go to subscribers as massive paper volumes.) But quite often, they’re not looking for specific people, but rather patterns of behavior. “Believe it or not, when you’ve done this long enough,” he says, “you can tell when somebody’s up to no good. It just doesn’t feel right.”

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Posted: 28th, January 2013 | In: Technology, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Mary Kay Beckham sues match.com for introducing her to a women killer

MARY Kay Beckman, 50, of Las Vegas, is suing dating site Match.com for leading her toward Wade Ridley, 53.

The couple dated for ten days before Ms Beckham ened it. Four months later, Ridley stabbed her ten times and kicked her in the head. Ms Beckham required surgery to her skull. Her sight and hearing were saved.

Ridley is now dead. He killed himself in prison. Before dying he admitted to the murder of  Anne Simenson, an Arizona woman he met on Match.com.

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Posted: 28th, January 2013 | In: Reviews, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Boozy teens: the cheery vodka skittles drink

BOOZY teens presents the cherry vodka Skittles drink. It sounds disgusting. But to anyone looking to start out on boozing, it’s a must. The older generation mutter dark things. In their day it was different. In their day you had to learn to drink with a proper bloody drink. None of this namby-pampy mulied pick ‘n’ mix. You did your apprenticeship on warm, left over Blue Nun and sucking the lemon slice at the bottom of a glass of Gin and Orange:

Posted: 26th, January 2013 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The creepiest adverts from the 1980s

THE creepiest adverts from the 1980s:

Spotter: SmashTV

Posted: 25th, January 2013 | In: Flashback, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


1974: Truck & Bus Transportation reviews Bimbo’s

FOOD has become such a hot topic in the rich West that we are offended by cheap protein in cheap meat products, and hipsters take photos of fine dining meals for tasteless blogs. Once upon a time, it was different. In 1974 Australia, for instance, Bluey Tucker used to write food reviews for Truck & Bus Transportation.

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Posted: 25th, January 2013 | In: Flashback, The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Nevada Rose: Inside the American Brothel: photos of the sex shops

WHAT’S it look like inside an American brothel? Marc McAndrews can answer that question without you having to visit one. He spent five years capturing 33 of Nevada’s brothels on camera. He’s published the images in a book, Nevada Rose: Inside the American Brothel. He says:

“I had all these preconceived ideas running around my head about what they were like and what went on inside a desert brothel … The women had final say if they wanted to sit for a portrait, and if they said ‘no’ that was that: no asking twice, no cajoling, no pressuring …  I approached the brothels the same way I would any other project or assignment, and when I photographed the women (or owners or customers, for that matter), I didn’t want to demonize them for what they did, but I was also careful not to glorify them. I think the fact that I became and remain friends with many of the women that work or have worked in the houses speaks to the honesty of the project.”

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Posted: 24th, January 2013 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Comments RSS feed:RSS 2.0