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The Consumer | Anorak - Part 8

The Consumer Category

We bring you the chic and unique, the best and most bizarre shopping offers both online and offline. We offer you tips on where to buy, and some of the less mainstream and crazy, individual and offbeat items on the internet. Anything that can be bought and sold can be featured here. And we love showcasing the best and worst art and design.

Little Nemo: Watch The Film And Read The Adventures Of The Most Sublime Comic Strip Hero

little nemo Little Nemo: Watch The Film And Read The Adventures Of The Most Sublime Comic Strip Hero

 

EVER read Little Nemo, the comic strip about the lad’s fabulous dreams?

The strip ran from October 15, 1905 to April 23, 1911 in the New York Herald.

 

mccay Little Nemo: Watch The Film And Read The Adventures Of The Most Sublime Comic Strip Hero

 

 

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Posted: 9th, March 2014 | In: Books, Flashback | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


16th Century German War Guide Teaches How To Make Flying Cats Bombs (Photos)

PA 19217337 16th Century German War Guide Teaches How To Make Flying Cats Bombs (Photos)

 

YOU’RE looking at an illustration from a 1530s manual on warfare. The advice is to “set fire to a castle or city which you can’t get at otherwise”.

One way of achieving this is with a flaming rocket cat. You can also surprise the enemy by using doves as instruments of death.

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Posted: 9th, March 2014 | In: Books, Flashback, Strange But True | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


11 Gastro Abominations From The Mid 20th Century

THE mid-century palette was vastly different than it is today. Much of what we find advertised in vintage cookbooks and magazines seems nauseating by today’s standards.  I’m sure the same will be true of our current tastes when viewed fifty years from now. This gastronomic sea change certainly makes for an interesting browse through recipes and food adverts from yesteryear. Here are a few exceptionally foul examples.

 

MEALS IN A MOLD

 

gastroabomination 11 Gastro Abominations From The Mid 20th Century

As a general rule of thumb, I prefer my meats not to be suspended in a freakish mold of gelatin and psuedo-mayonnaise. But I’m funny that way. However, I will say the pimiento used for the fish eye is a stroke of brilliance.

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Posted: 7th, March 2014 | In: Flashback, Key Posts, The Consumer | Comments (3) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


15 Things Mad Magazine Gave The World

PA 11538843 15 Things Mad Magazine Gave The World

MAD publisher Bill Gaines, 1970.

 

MAD Magazine is an American institution. It’s been going since 1952 and is still funny, but it’s given the world more than just gags…

 

THE FREEDOM TO TAKE THE PISS
In 1961, a group of composers including Irving Berlin (writer of White Christmas) tried to sue MAD following a series of parody songs they’d published, to be sung to the tunes of the originals. The case ended up in the Supreme Court, which ultimately ruled in MAD’s favour – they basically ruled that it was clear these songs were jokes, that they weren’t intended to be mistaken for the originals, and that they weren’t damaging. This was seen as a landmark case in terms of making parodies legit, and is still regularly cited in courts.

 

51x2TFRWowL 15 Things Mad Magazine Gave The World

 

 

ULTRAVIOLENCE WITH A SUBTEXT


Antonio Prohias’s Spy Vs Spy strip was a wordless ongoing saga of a black-clad spy and a white-clad spy trapping, bombing, shooting and blowing each other up in contrived-but-amazing ways using good old-fashioned big round bombs with “BOMB” written on them. As well as needless violence, though, it’s an allegory of the Cold War, the thirty-year period of general global tenseness that led to the revolution in Prohias’s native Cuba. So it’s well clever, innit, with its explosions. Prohias died in 1998, but the strip continues in airbrush-and-stencil form by Peter Kuper, still bearing the credit “By Prohias” in spy-esque Morse Code every time.

 

Justin Bieber on MAD Magazine 15 Things Mad Magazine Gave The World

 

 

A GAP-TOOTHED CHAMPION

 

The grinning, gap-toothed idiot on nearly every cover of MAD, Alfred E Neuman has become a beloved American icon despite rarely if ever showing up in the magazine itself – his appearances are limited to the cover and a quote on the contents page. On the covers, though, he’s been everyone from King Kong to Justin Bieber to Jabba The Hutt to the baby from the Nevermind album. He and his catchphrase (“What, me worry?”) have still become enormous – Jimi Hendrix introduced his Woodstock set with “What, me worry?”. Barack Obama, arguably the most powerful individual in the world, once described himself as having “the politics of [former Presidential candidate] Alfred E Smith and the ears of Alfred E Neuman”.

 

Poiuyt small 15 Things Mad Magazine Gave The World

 

 

NEW FERSCHLUGGINER WORDS
You know that impossible-to-colour-in optical illusion of a trident that might be a bident? MAD named it – it’s called a poiuyt (which is a very satisfying word to type). They also enjoyed popularising obscure German or Yiddish words, like potrzebie, veeblefetzer and furshlugginer, which became ingrained enough in American culture to recently pop up in Boardwalk Empire.

 

mad fold in 15 Things Mad Magazine Gave The World

 

 

 

FOLD-INS


One of the trademark features of any issue of MAD is Al Jaffee’s Fold-In, an image on the inside back cover that starts off as one thing and, by folding a section of the page into another, reveals a hidden message – like the one Marge’s cellmate has tattooed on her back when she goes to prison in The Simpsons. They’re ridiculously clever, and the now 91-year-old Jaffee does them with no help from Photoshop or computers at all, preferring to paint on a stiff wooden board and only seeing the folded-in image when he’s sent the magazine. Try making one. You can’t. It’s just too HARD.

 

sergio1 15 Things Mad Magazine Gave The World

 

 

MARGINS BETTER THAN WHAT THEY SURROUNDED


Most magazines feature loads of dead space in the margins. At MAD they decided to make them a bit more interesting, by getting Sergio Aragones (owner of a badass moustache and known as the fastest cartoonist in the world) to doodle in them. He’s been doing this since 1963, only missing one issue when the Post Office lost his mail.

 

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Bill Gaines being understated, London, 1971.

 

 

THE BEST PUBLISHER EVER


MAD founder Bill Gaines was the son of Max Gaines, who had been instrumental in the success of Action Comics in the 1930s before setting up his own company, Educational Comics (EC). After Max’s death, Bill took over and started publishing first romance, then horror comics. These comics – including Tales From The Crypt and Weird Science – were really successful but led to the Comics Code Authority, essentially a censorship board. Gaines responded by transforming the two-year-old MAD from a comic into a magazine. When MAD became successful, Gaines became known for his eccentricities and simultaneous cheapness and generosity. Every year he would take the whole staff on an overseas trip – one year, he found out MAD had one subscriber in Haiti, whose subscription was about to run out, so he took the whole staff to visit him and persuade him to renew it. He also once paid twice the market value of really low-grade paper because he felt MAD shouldn’t be printed on nice stock. Until his death in 1992, he was greeted by staff members with a cheery “Fuck you, Bill”.

 

891679 15 Things Mad Magazine Gave The World

 

 

A BUNCH OF SHORT-LIVED IMITATORS


A lot of pretenders to MAD’s throne stepped up over the years, of varying degrees of quality. Cracked (which survives as the genuinely excellent Cracked.com) was an unabashed poor-man’s version of it that nonetheless lasted forty years, while Crazy, Sick, Flip, Whack, Nuts (not that one), Wild, Riot, Bughouse, Eh, Unsane, Get Lost and Panic all bit the dust pretty quick.

 

 

 

THE WORST MOVIE EVER

 

After the success of the amazing 1978 film Animal House, produced in association with the magazine National Lampoon, MAD became attached to a similar college-set film called Up The Academy, starring former Bond girl (and later wife of Ringo Starr) Barbara Bach. It was by all accounts a complete dog-egg, leading MAD to disown it, and Bill Gaines to pay $30,000 to remove MAD’s name from it and offer handwritten apologies and refunds to anyone who’d sat through it.

 

PA 12062182 300x214 15 Things Mad Magazine Gave The World

Mad Magazine cartoonist Sergio Aragones, left, Jack Davis and Al Jaffee, right, speak with Savannah College of Art and Design professor John Larison, second from the left, during an event hosted by SCAD and the National Cartoonists Society, Friday, Oct. 11, 2011 in Savannah, Ga.

 

 

THE USUAL GANG OF IDIOTS


Before the switch to magazine format, founding editor Harvey Kurtzman created the majority of the magazine, but after the switch, freelancers known as “the usual gang of idiots” came in and made the magazine their own. Regular readers of MAD learned to look out for certain names on features – if Dick DeBartolo had written a Mort Drucker-illustrated film spoof, you knew it was going to be good. One of their strangest but best-loved contributors was Don Martin, known for his incredibly unusual way of drawing feet and ridiculous sound effects – like Wonder Woman undoing her bra being soundtracked with “Snap ploobadoof”. Both loved and hated was Dave Berg’s The Lighter Side Of…, a long-running, severely inoffensive feature which featured probably the worst-dressed characters ever drawn.

 

2d3802df50084410687171770dff9384 15 Things Mad Magazine Gave The World

Cover by Drew Struzan.

 

 

BIG, BIG ART NAMES


As well as influencing a ton of big names (there’d be no Daniel Clowes without MAD, Robert Crumb cites it as a huge influence, and Alan Moore has claimed that MAD’s Superduperman spoof was a direct influence on Watchmen) some properly big deals have passed through the doors of MAD. Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Art Spiegelman, of Maus fame, was a regular contributor, Drew Struzan and Frank Frazetta both did covers, and one issue a few years ago contained contributions from no less than ten Pulitzer-winning cartoonists. Plus “Weird Al” Yankovic once wrote for them.

 

 

A BETTER VIZ


Viz editor Graham Dury, creator of the Fat Slags, tells us “MAD magazine had a massive influence on me when I was little. The two blokes on earth I would most like to get stuck in a lift with are Don Martin and Sergio Aragones, so long as they had a big stack of paper and some pens with them. I loved the way everybody Martin drew had that fantastic self-confident strut and shoes that flopped over at the end. And Aragones’s scribblings were probably the best bit of the magazine. They showed that the editors really cared about it and wanted to just pack it with stuff. But I doubt I’ll end up in a lift with either of them. Well certainly not Don Martin anyway, as he’s dead. If any of your readers see Sergio Aragones getting into a dodgy looking lift, could they let me know?”

 

SUPER-CHUFFED CELEBS


Much in the same way that Nirvana only really felt like they’d made it when they got a call from “Weird Al” Yankovic, being spoofed in MAD is kind of like a badge of honour. MAD’s letters page regularly features notes from celebrities proudly holding up magazines taking the piss out of them. When asked about big moments in his career, Slash from Guns N’Roses said “The magazine cover that has meant the most to me was probably when I appeared in MAD magazine, as a caricature of Alfred E. Neuman. That was when I felt I’d arrived.”

 

MAD 411 Nadina 232x300 15 Things Mad Magazine Gave The World

 

 

AMERICA IN A NUTSHELL


If there was an alien race out there that had only ever been exposed to MAD, they’d have a pretty decent grasp of modern American history. You can trace wars, leaders, politics and technology through it, as well as the history of entertainment, from issue #4’s Superduperman to last issue’s Robin Thicke and Miley Cyrus cover. MAD’s first cover after 9/11 nearly didn’t happen – the initial cover story was on the New York Marathon, and showed corpse-laden NY streets. They wisely decided to pull it, and replaced it with an image that was simultaneously funny, respectful, patriotic and… excuse us, there must be dust in here.

 

HEALTHY CYNICISM


Comics in the 50s didn’t encourage people to question anything – everything was more about being pleasant and not rocking the boat. MAD came along and started picking holes in the American Dream, suggesting the products Americans were buying were crap, their leaders were clueless and that the people were being treated like dicks. These days everyone’s a cynical bastard, but MAD invented it.

Posted: 5th, March 2014 | In: Books, Key Posts, News | Comments (2) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


1970s Irish Text Book: ‘Draw A Circle Around The One God Loves Most’

THIS photo is from an actual Irish school textbook in the 70s. Readers are invited to identify God’s pecking order:

Draw a circle around the one God loves most

God can’t draw his own circle because he’s using his right hand as a clue and the left hand only does the Devil’s work.

 

Screen shot 2014 03 05 at 10.49.12 1970s Irish Text Book: Draw A Circle Around The One God Loves Most

 

 

Spotter:  Rubber Bandits @Rubberbandits

Posted: 5th, March 2014 | In: Books, Flashback | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Can Kermit Make New York Muppets More British With Tea?

CAN Kermit makes New York muppets more British? Isn’t that what Lipton’s – makers of a really sweet, horrible tea – mean by making American “more tea? They mean more courteous, polite, civic minded, chivalrous and chilled.

That’s the British, right. Just no-one tell Lipton’s and the Yanks that the modern Briton lives by the motto Dipso, Fatso, Tesco, Asbo.

 

 

Dink the tea and turn from  Animal  (raw charisma, humour and rock music talent) to Kermit (company man, pig-seducer and signer of dirges).  Or maybe drink tea and turn itno Sir Thomas Lipton, the uber-rich tea magnet, pictured here on one of his  yachts in 1910.

 

PA 4476090 Can Kermit Make New York Muppets More British With Tea?

 

Tea – it’ll make you rich. Now that’s how to seduce the the New Yorkers to the brew…

 

Posted: 3rd, March 2014 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Bad Souvenirs: ‘Canned Radiation’ From Three Mile Island

AN addition to our list of Bad Souvenirs “Canned Radiation” from Three Mile Island produced by Brenster Enterprises of Etters Pennsylvania.

 

souvenir canned radiation Bad Souvenirs: Canned Radiation From Three Mile Island

 

Six suggested uses indicated on the label were:

1. Remove label and tell your enemy its laughing gas.

2. Energy free night light (illuminates in darkness).

3. Mix with cold cream for that radiant beauty.

4. Instant male sterilization (sniff twice daily).

5. Use as a room air freshener.

6. Toothpaste recipe: mix 3 to 1 ratio with baking soda, for ever glowing smile.

 

paste Bad Souvenirs: Canned Radiation From Three Mile Island

 

Spotter:  Oak Ridge MuseumFfffound

 

Posted: 3rd, March 2014 | In: The Consumer | Comment (1) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Whole Foods, The Paleo Diet And The New-Kosher Vitamineral Earth Are Creationism For Stupid Liberals

whole food bible Whole Foods, The Paleo Diet And The New Kosher Vitamineral Earth Are Creationism For Stupid Liberals

 

ORGANIC food and whole foods are a big marketing con for the gullible who think they know better than the rest of them. Right? Michael Schulson muses on those right-on liberals who “get riled up about creationists and climate-change deniers, but lap up the quasi-religious snake oil at Whole Foods”. Modern science is not a path on the old truths:

At times, the Whole Foods selection slips from the pseudoscientific into the quasi-religious. It’s not just  the Ezekiel 4:9 bread (its recipe drawn from the eponymous Bible verse), or Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps, or Vitamineral Earth’s “Sacred Healing Food.” It’s also, at least for Jewish shoppers, the taboos thathave grown up around the company’s Organic Integrity effort, all of which sound eerily like kosher law. There’s a sign in the Durham store suggesting that shoppers bag their organic and conventional fruit separately – lest one rub off on the other – and grind their organic coffees at home – because the Whole Foods grinders process conventional coffee, too, and so might transfer some non-organic dust. “This slicer used for cutting both CONVENTIONAL and ORGANIC breads” warns a sign above the Durham location’s bread slicer. Synagogue kitchens are the only other places in which I’ve seen signs implying that level of food-separation purity.

Look, if homeopathic remedies make you feel better, take them. If the Paleo diet helps you eat fewer TV dinners, that’s great – even if the Paleo diet is probably premised more on The Flintstones than it is on any actual evidence about human evolutionary history. If non-organic crumbs bother you, avoid them. And there’s much to praise in Whole Foods’ commitment to sustainability and healthful foods. Still: a significant portion of what Whole Foods sells is based on simple pseudoscience. And sometimes that can spill over into outright anti-science (think What Doctors Don’t Tell You, or Whole Foods’ overblown GMO campaign, which could merit its own article).

Why are so many whole food believers picky eaters..?

Posted: 3rd, March 2014 | In: Technology, The Consumer | Comment (1) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Artist Creates These Real Barbie Dolls With Buttocks, Hips And Raw Plastic Sex Appeal

HOW real is Barbie? Do you know a grown, adult woman with a 36-18-33 figure? That question to you, people who don’t live in Florida or TV’s version of Essex? Pennsylvania’s Nickolay Lamm has created Barbie doll who looks more like a ‘Real Barbie’, or Barbara.

 

 

real barbie 5 Artist Creates These Real Barbie Dolls With Buttocks, Hips And Raw Plastic Sex Appeal

 

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Posted: 1st, March 2014 | In: The Consumer | Comments (3) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Kissing and Cuddling: Extract 1 From Jimmy Hill’s Striking For Soccer

PA 1380677 Kissing and Cuddling: Extract 1 From Jimmy Hills Striking For Soccer

Jimmy Hill (2nd left, beard), Chairman of the Professional Footballers’ Association, shakes hands with Joe Richards, President of the Football League, and John Hare (striped suit), at the Ministry of Labour in London. * …after attending a successful four-and-a-half-hour meeting to discuss football players’ conditions and pay. A strike was called off as agreement was reached between the football league and the PFA in the presence of John Hare, Minister of Labour. Date: 18/01/1961

 

HIGHLIGHTS from Striking For Soccer,  Jimmy Hill’s 1963 book on his part in the end of the maximum wage.  In 1961, Hill, the then Professional Football Association chairman, led footballers to victor in the abolition of the maximum wage with the threat of a players’ strike. The top wage a player could legally earn was…£20 a week. Hill’s Fulham teammate Johnny Haynes soon became the first £100-a-week player.

The book was published by The Sportmans Book Club, a members-only, mail-order publisher based in London and Letchworth Garden City.

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Posted: 1st, March 2014 | In: Books, Sports | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Bad Souvenirs: 15 Truly Terrible Momentos To Collect And Regret

THE decision by eBay to discontinue its trade in Holocaust memorabilia brought to an end a particularly offensive and peculiar episode in the annals of collections and souvenir-hunting.

 

Souvenir1 Bad Souvenirs: 15 Truly Terrible Momentos To Collect And Regret

 

And while it is undoubtedly one of the most despicable examples, there is no shortage of tasteless, gauche and tacky souvenirs out there, if you know here to look…

(Warning: one picture below portrays a lynching. It is shocking.)

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Posted: 1st, March 2014 | In: Key Posts, Strange But True, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


How To Cure You Sick Addiction To Hoarding

WHY do we hoard things? David Wallis notes:

[S]ome of the same brain areas that are underactive under normal circumstances become hyperactive when hoarders are confronted with their possessions. David F. Tolin of the Yale University School of Medicine asked participants in a study to decide whether their old papers can be shredded, while monitoring their brain activity. He found that hoarders’ brains zoomed into overdrive like a seismograph measuring an earthquake—compared to healthy controls. (That didn’t happen when they watched someone else’s papers being ditched.) “The parts of the brain involved in helping you gauge that something is important are kicked into such overdrive that they are maxed out, so everything seems important,” Tolin explains.

Monika Eckfield, a professor of physiological nursing at California State University, San Francisco, concurs that many hoarding patients struggle with processing information. To avoid the anxiety of throwing something away, they simply put off the decision to do so. “This is common to all of us,” Eckfield says. Like the neuroscientists, she believes hoarding becomes abnormal as a result of “mis-wiring” in the brain’s executive functions. Chronic hoarders “have a much harder time following through,” she says. “They get distracted. They get disorganized. They end up adding to the pile, and the idea of sorting through those piles is very overwhelming.”

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Posted: 28th, February 2014 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


A History Of Controversial Children’s Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

ANORAK’s history of controversial children’s books: sex, drugs, sambo’s gay lover and anti-authoritarianism in the classroom.

 

The Little Red Schoolbook

 

Book1 A History Of Controversial Childrens Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

 

In 1971 the proprietor of Stage 1 publishers was found guilty of having in his possession obscene books for publication for gain. Richard Handyside was fined £25 on each summons and ordered to pay £110 costs.

The obscene publications were copies of The Little Red Schoolbook written by two Danish schoolteachers, Søren Hansen and Jesper Jensen – and then rewritten by a group of British adults and schoolchildren, including a young Hilary Benn. It urged young readers to question authority and challenge social conventions, and described adults as ‘paper tigers’. Pupils were encouraged to disrupt lessons that they found boring.

The book was widely regarded as an invitation to anarchy, and it was banned in Italy and France. An abridged version was eventually passed for publication in the UK, but it had by this time achieved considerable notoriety. Ironically, the main area of contention was not the political message, but the section giving basic sex education and advice – particularly concerning masturbation – most of which would be on the school curriculum these days. This was of course the convenient pretext chosen the DPP in order to suppress a book that they regarded as socially subversive.

An extraordinary documentary can be heard here.

 

 

Noddy

Enid Blyton is by no means the only venerable authoress to find her books falling out of favour as popular opinion changes over the decades, as Richmal Crompton will have known only too well.

 

Book2 A History Of Controversial Childrens Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

 

She remains the most high-profile example, however, thanks to her ‘Gollywog’ series, which related the adventures of Golly, Woggy and Nigger, who liked nothing better than to stride along, in Blyton’s own words, ‘arm-in-arm, singing merrily their favourite song – which, as you may guess, was “Ten Little Nigger Boys”.’ These books are not currently available in most children’s libraries

More famous are her Noddy books, in which they feature once again. In one particularly pointed incident, Noddy is attacked by golliwogs, who steal his car and leave him stranded.

 

Book2b A History Of Controversial Childrens Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

 

Luckily the Toyland police were very efficient, and always at hand.

 

Book3 A History Of Controversial Childrens Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

 

Not all gollies are bad, though. In Golly Town we find a Mr Golly, who is one of Noddy’s best friends. He owns Toyland’s garage, looks after Noddy’s car, and is an all-round bloody good bloke, as this picture proves…

 

Book4 A History Of Controversial Childrens Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

 

 

 

The Tale of Little Black Sambo

 

Book5 A History Of Controversial Childrens Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

 

 

Another former staple of junior school libraries that fell out of favour (though it remains popular in Japan). In 1996, Fred Marcellino produced a set of new pictures, renamed the characters, and republished it under the title The Story of Little Babaji.

 

Book6 A History Of Controversial Childrens Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

 

 

Tintin

Book7 A History Of Controversial Childrens Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

 

One could be charitable and say that Hergé’s most controversial Tintin adventure merely represented the condescending views of Belgian (and British) society at the time.

 

Book8 A History Of Controversial Childrens Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

Book9 A History Of Controversial Childrens Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

 

Post-war, they seemed anachronistic and offensive, portraying as they did a nation of stupid, lazy, infantile savages in need of a clever white master. The book quickly fell out of favour (and out of print).

 

 

The Brave Cowboy

Book10 A History Of Controversial Childrens Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

 

A similar trick was pulled with Joan Walsh Anglund’s charming best-seller, in which scary ‘Indians’ were removed and replaced by white bankrobbers and other ne’er-do-wells.

 

Book11 A History Of Controversial Childrens Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

 

 

Jenny Lives With Eric and Martin

Book12 A History Of Controversial Childrens Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

 

This otherwise unremarkable tale relates the everyday life of five-year-old Jenn, who lives with her dad and his boyfriend.

In 1986 it was reported that the book was in the library of a school run by the Labour-controlled Inner London Education Authority, and this was a major factor in the Tory government passing Section 28 of the Local Government Act, which prohibited the ‘promotion’ of homosexuality. The full, bizarre story can be found here

 

And Tango Makes Three

Book13 A History Of Controversial Childrens Books: Sex, Sambo And Obscene Rebellion

 

This modern-day ‘Jenny’, based on a true story about two ‘gay’ penguins in New York’s Central Park Zoo has the distinction of having had the most had the most ban requests in the USA in 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2010. In 2009 it came second.

‘It’s regrettable that some parents believe reading a true story about two male penguins hatching an egg will damage their children’s moral development,’ said co-author Justin Richardson. ‘They are entitled to express their beliefs, but not to inflict them on others.’

Posted: 28th, February 2014 | In: Books, Flashback, Key Posts | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Thick Bible Stops Bullets From Killing Man (Kindle Too Thin)

TO Dayton, Ohio, where bus driver Ricky Wagoner, 49, has been shot once in the leg and twice in the Bible he keeps in his breast pocket.
Saved by the Good Book. Wagoner went for his three assailants, stabbing one with his pen. When one dropped the weapon, Waggoner picked it up and fired at the trio.
(The pen is indeed mightier than the gun.)

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Posted: 26th, February 2014 | In: Books, Strange But True | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Those Tax Dodging Scumbags At Zara!

WE’RE well used to hearing stories about how the tech companies, Apple, Google and the like, are dodging taxes all over Europe. But people are starting to realise that it’s not just that sector. Many other multinationals are indulging in very much the same behaviour:

Another reason for Inditex’s industry-best profit margins of almost 15 percent: the company uses the kind of tax loopholes coming under increasing scrutiny from international regulators.

In the past five years, Inditex has shifted almost $2 billion in profits to a tiny unit operating in the Netherlands and Switzerland, records show. Although that subsidiary employs only about 0.1 percent of Inditex’s worldwide workforce, it reported almost 20 percent of the parent company’s global profits last year, according to company filings.

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Posted: 26th, February 2014 | In: Money, News, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Sick and Full of Burning: 13 Regrettable BookTitles

FAR be it from me to stifle creativity – an author should be able to title their work as he or she likes.  However, there is a limit to my tolerance.  Sometimes, the title is so  terrible that it simply must go; creativity be damned.  Here’s a handful of vintage reads which suffer from just such an affliction.

 

12 Chinks and Woman by James Hadley Chase (1941)

 

12 CHINKS AND A WOMAN by James Hadley Chase 1948 Sick and Full of Burning: 13 Regrettable BookTitles

 

I understand people weren’t as sensitive to racial issues back then, but this is ridiculous.  The novel’s title was later changed to The Doll’s Bad News; a wise move, but you can’t undo this level of epic racism.  This from the author who gave us these other great titles: The Marijuana Mob (1950), There’s a Hippie on the Highway (1970) and Goldfish Have No Hiding Place (1974).

 

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Posted: 26th, February 2014 | In: Books, Flashback, Key Posts | Comments (6) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


British Diner Burns His Knob Shagging A Domino’s Pizza

 British Diner Burns His Knob Shagging A Dominos Pizza

 

DOMINO’S UK has been in a twitter conversation with a customer:

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Posted: 25th, February 2014 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


1960s Horror Food: The Luminous Metrecal Diet In A Can

IN the 1950s and 1960s, Mead Johnson’s Metrecal promised to get you into shape. What that shape was, we people of the future can only guess at – and we guess it was a human form jackknifed over a toilet.

Mead Johnson spotted Sustagen, a composite blend of mix of skimmed milk powder, soybean  flour, vitamins, minerals, corn oil, minerals and vitamins spooned into hospital patients not up to eating solids. Pressing ‘Go’ on the random-name-generating computer, produced Metrecal, the weight-reducing miracle. It looked like baby powder. It tasted like baby sick. But – buy – it sure cured your appetite.

Take a drink and get slim. But do stick to the 900 calories of Metrecal a day.

This advert for the vile goop is from 1965:

 

 
The keen-to-be-slim could chow down on Metrecal milkshakes, Metrecal cookies, Metrecal clam chowder (New England style) and Metrecal tuna and noodles. Remember, so long as you kept to 900 calories a day, you’d be thinning. And nothing was better at building the new you than the liquid lunches, dinners and breakfasts.

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Posted: 25th, February 2014 | In: Flashback, Key Posts, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Special Offer: 100 Plastic Pennies For $3.49

THE economy can be saved. Keep your bitcoins – invest in plastic pennies:

pennies Special Offer: 100 Plastic Pennies For $3.49

Spotter: Bits and Pieces

Posted: 25th, February 2014 | In: Money, Photojournalism, The Consumer | Comment (1) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Great Moments in Phallic Occurrences

HERE are a few vintage phallic instances (either real or inferred) which have gained a bit of notoriety over the years. Read on – your inner idiot will thank you.

 

1. THE RIFLEMAN’S LOG

rifleman10 Great Moments in Phallic Occurrences

 

This Rifleman comic book has experienced a certain degree of notoriety for what can only be described as a horrifically uncomfortable cover.  How is it possible that the subtext went unnoticed before printing?  Looking through old magazines, comic books, etc. it’s easy to stumble onto accidental phallic imagery.  Perhaps it’s because they weren’t as jaded as we are these days, always finding the tawdry in the innocent.  Or maybe published adverts and illustrations generally weren’t as polished, edited and re-edited as they are today.  Who knows?   Yet, the phallic nature of this one seems so extreme, it couldn’t possibly have been missed by even the most obtrusively naive,… right?

 

 

2. THREEPIO’S UNIT

c3po card Great Moments in Phallic Occurrences

 

This Star Wars trading card has also received some well-earned notoriety.  It appears that C-3PO is sporting a golden metallic erection of impressive proportions.  The robot was supposed to be a “protocol droid”, but this picture has one wondering if C-3PO had other useful functions not fit for a family movie.  According to the official Star Wars site:

It appears that the extra appendage is not the work of an artist, but rather a trick of timing and light…. At the exact instant the photo was snapped, a piece fell off the Threepio costume and just happened to line up in such a way as to suggest a bawdy image.

According to Snopes, whether this was intentional or not remains undetermined.

 

3. SEARS CATALOG PROTRUSION

 

searscatalog602 thumb 500x1423 thumb 300x853 Great Moments in Phallic Occurrences

 

This unfortunate event occurred in the 1975 Sears Fall/Winter catalog.  Extending below the boxer shorts emerges what appears to be a glimpse of this model’s manhood.  A lot of squinting, enlarging, and Photoshop exploration has occurred over the years trying to get this mysterious object into focus.  Can it truly be what we think it is?  Or is it simply a smudge?  We may never really know.

This phallic incident even inspired a novelty song “The Man on Page 602” by Zoot Fenster, released not long after the catalog was published.

 

“The picture’s got me out of sorts, because I don’t understand,
Are they advertising boxer shorts, or are they trying to sell the man?”

 

 

4. THREE’S COMPANY SCROTAL EXPOSURE

Threes Company Great Moments in Phallic Occurrences

 

God knows, shorts certainly lived up to their name in the 1970s.  So, you can hardly fault John Ritter for what took place in episode 161 of Three’s Company.  In this now infamous sitcom episode, he takes a seat on a bed and in the process reveals portions of his junk for the camera. If you blink you miss it, and it’s not exactly in high definition either…. But, make no mistake, Ritter’s naughty bits are definitely there. The incident yielded one of my favorite quotes of all time. When asked by The New York Observer whether they should edit the scene for future broadcasts, Ritter responded:

“I’ve requested that Nickelodeon air both versions, edited and unedited, because sometimes you feel like a nut, and sometimes you don’t.”

 

 

5. POPSICLE OF SHAME

Skysicle Great Moments in Phallic Occurrences

I present to you this highly troubling Evel Knievel Popsicle ad.  It hasn’t garnered any notoriety yet, but it’s high time it did.   Spread the word.

 

THE END

superman Great Moments in Phallic Occurrences

 

More here.

 

Posted: 25th, February 2014 | In: Books, Flashback, Key Posts, TV & Radio | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


I Was Julian Assange’s Ghost Writer: The Fantastic Story Of ‘Swedish Whores, Pentagon Bores And Being Hitler

PA 10599987 I Was Julian Assanges Ghost Writer: The Fantastic Story Of Swedish Whores, Pentagon Bores And Being Hitler

 

 

ANDREW  O’Hagan’s wonderful essay on ghost writing Julian Assange’s autobiography is better than any book on the Wikileak’s puiblisher.

Highlights from it are:

Assange didn’t want to write the book himself but didn’t want the book’s ghostwriter to be anybody who already knew a lot about him. I told Jamie that I’d seen Assange at the Frontline Club the year before, when the first WikiLeaks stories emerged, and that he was really interesting but odd, maybe even a bit autistic. Jamie agreed, but said it was an amazing story. ‘He wants a kind of manifesto, a book that will reflect this great big generational shift.’

At 5.30 the next day Jamie arrived at my flat with his editorial colleague Nick Davies. (Mental health warning: there are two Nick Davies in this story. This one worked for Canongate; the second is a well-known reporter for the Guardian.) They had just come back on the train from Norfolk. Jamie said that Assange had poked his eye with a log or something, so had sat through three hours of discussion with his eyes closed.

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Posted: 22nd, February 2014 | In: Books, News | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


You Can Still Buy Those Ridiculous ‘Too Cool To Do Drugs’ Pencils

drugs pencils You Can Still Buy Those Ridiculous Too Cool To Do Drugs Pencils

 

DID you own a “Too Cool To Do Drugs”  pencil in the 1990s?  So long as you weren’t a pencil user, the message was succinct and pure. But those of you who like a sharpener or several, realised that the more pencil you used, the more the message changed.

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Posted: 22nd, February 2014 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Comedy Books On Sale At The Dachau Concentration Camp Museum Teach Germans About Those Funny Jews

PA 9517457 Comedy Books On Sale At The Dachau Concentration Camp Museum Teach Germans About Those Funny Jews

 

EXIT via the gift shop. Goldblog spotted one at the German”s Dachau concentration camp. Rachel Salamander’s bookshop “Literaturhandlung”, in the visitors’ center of the Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial Site, “specialises in the history of Dachau Concentration Camp and those persecuted by the Nazi regime, but books on related topics are also available. There are also a number of books on Jewish culture and literature.”

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Posted: 21st, February 2014 | In: News, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0