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Anorak | ePetition Site proves Government by Wikipedia Would Definitely Work: Let’s Get Rid of The Houses of Parliament

ePetition Site proves Government by Wikipedia Would Definitely Work: Let’s Get Rid of The Houses of Parliament

by | 5th, August 2011

SO FAR the government’s ePetition website has proved one thing: Government by online polls would definitely work. Why pay for MPs when you can have a website with a poll widget and the wisdom of the general public? The ePetition site has shown that while a lot of people believe one thing, a lot of other people tend to believe the opposite. In the end, the two beliefs cancel each other out and leave us pretty much muddling along doing the same as before. The result would roughly maintain the status quo, but hopefully leave the nation hundreds of thousands of pounds better off by cutting out MP salaries – and expenses. We could even rent the Houses of Parliament out to tourists and make some dollars.

Plus if we finally went for government by ePetition, the little things that bug us might get sorted once and for all, for example- we might finally get the cut in soft drink prices that this guy argues so passionately for in Petition 981. We hear you Kieron Klaus.

The government’s ePetition site relaunched yesterday with the idea that topics that get more than 100,000 backers on the site will be debated in Parliament. A campaign by the Daily Mail and Guido Fawkes means has put the death penalty back on the national agenda 52 years after it was banned with dozens of separate petitions calling for its reinstatement. Though votes for petitions for the death penalty seem matched by votes in petitions against the death penalty with each effectively cancelling the other out.

The main issue on the ePetition site however are the technical problems: with the site going under due to heavy demand and topic duplication meaning that dozens of petitions sprang up asking for the same thing.

 



Posted: 5th, August 2011 | In: Key Posts, Technology Comments (3) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink