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Anorak | Climate change creates geothermal opportunities and other unproven science in the name of politics

Climate change creates geothermal opportunities and other unproven science in the name of politics

by | 29th, February 2012

IN “Climate change will shake the Earth” Bill McGuire delivers a vision of doom. In 2008, Bill McGuire wrote Seven Years to Save the Planet . Says he:

A changing climate isn’t just about floods, droughts and heatwaves. It brings erupting volcanoes and catastrophic earthquakes too… The idea that a changing climate can persuade the ground to shake, volcanoes to rumble and tsunamis to crash on to unsuspecting coastlines seems, at first, to be bordering on the insane.

He has examples.
Here in the UK, we only have to go back a couple years to April 2010, when the word on everyone’s lips was Eyjafjallajökull – the ice-covered Icelandic volcano that brought UK and European air traffic to a grinding halt. Less than a year ago, our planet’s ability to shock and awe headed the news once again as the east coast of Japan was bludgeoned by a cataclysmic combination of megaquake and tsunami, resulting – at a quarter of a trillion dollars or so – in the biggest natural-catastrophe bill ever.
Is it a fact that global warming caused them? No. But when the word on everyone’s lips is  Eyjafjallajökull, humanity is in a state of shock:

Volcanic blasts too can be added to the portfolio of postglacial geological pandemonium; the warming climate being greeted by an unprecedented fiery outburst that wracked Iceland as its frozen carapace dwindled, and against which the recent ashy ejaculation from the island’s most unpronounceable volcano pales.

He speaks of “geological mayhem”.

Through our climate-changing activities we are loading the dice in favour of escalating geological havoc at a time when we can most do without it.

Ten years ago would have been better.
Unless there is a dramatic and completely unexpected turnaround in the way in which the human race manages itself and the planet, then long-term prospects for our civilisation look increasingly grim.

But earthquakes and volcanoes happen without the global warming element, don’t they?

… when energy, water and food resources are coming under ever-growing pressure, and when the debilitating effects of anthropogenic climate change are insinuating themselves increasingly into every nook and cranny of our world and our lives, the last thing we need is for the dozing subterranean giant to awaken.

Richard Lindzen has given a talk in London.

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Posted: 29th, February 2012 | In: News Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink

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