Anorak

Anorak | Washington Restaurant gives discount for well-behaved kids – you don’t stand a chance

Washington Restaurant gives discount for well-behaved kids – you don’t stand a chance

by | 11th, February 2013

well behaved kids discount Washington Restaurant gives discount for well behaved kids   you dont stand a chance

EVEN parents know that children in restaurants are the worst thing on Earth. Noisy, snot-faced infants are worse than teams of drunk rugby players and screaming hen-parties put together. They howl, loudly need the toilet, don’t like anything and worst of all, wander around establishments bugging the rest of civilisation who have enough to deal with while eating in public and being forced to pretend to know about wine.

Over in Washington, staff at Sogno di Vino had a marvellous idea – they gave a family-of-five a discount on their bill because the offspring were ‘well behaved kids’.

A cheaper bill and a free bowl of ice-cream for the children to share! How old? The three kids are aged two, three and eight. And there’s you, with your screaming toddlers with skiddy undercrackers and abject hatred for anyone trying to have a good time.

No discount for you.

“When we received our tab, it had a discount listed for ‘Well Behaved Kids’. A pleasant surprise after a lovely meal,” Ms King wrote on her blog.

“As a family of five with kids aged 2, 3 and 8, we know the restaurant staff isn’t always terribly excited to have us at one of their larger tables. Having worked front of house in the restaurant industry prior to having children, I also know first hand what it can be like to serve families.

“We don’t expect handouts for acting respectful of the folks who bring us our food. But it certainly makes you feel good when someone else notices your kids in a positive light.”

Sogno di Vino owner Rob Scott said: “It was just an act of kindness. Everybody in my generation was raised to behave in restaurants. [Those] parenting skills have been forgotten in some cases.”

Stupid parents.



Posted: 11th, February 2013 | In: News, The Consumer Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink