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Hazel Blears Explains Political Blogging

by | 6th, November 2008

IF Hazel Blears were half as sharp as her voice she’d understand just how dumb her comments on blogggers are.

(Image: Beau Bo D’Or)

Blears is addressing the Hansard Society. The subject is “poltical disengagment”. Indeed:

“Political blogs are written by people with disdain for the political system and politicians, who see their function as unearthing scandals, conspiracies and perceived hypocrisy.”

Blears is the countries – get his – Communities Minister. It says so on her, er, blog.

Blears seems to have missed the entire US Presidential campaign, failing to notice how the Obama camp harnessed the power of the web, bloggers and social networks.

It gets better. Blears then blames the media for, well, everything:

“Until political blogging adds value to our political culture, by allowing new voices, ideas and legitimate protest and challenge, and until the mainstream media reports politics in a calmer, more responsible manner, it will continue to fuel a culture of cynicism and despair.”

Nothing then to do then with politicos being self-serving, learning to smile through new teeth, taking all the praise for the good times and not forseeing the bad times, lying to the electorate over a war, lying to the elctorate over tobacco advertising, being opportunistic, using race as tool to whip up hatred and mistrust and seeing politics as a career and not a calling.

It’s all about the media. It is they who must learn to be more trusting.

The Independent notes that some “politicians write blogs too”. Some even write for the papers.

The commentariat operates without scrutiny or redress. They cannot be held to account for their views, even when they perform the most athletic and acrobatic of flip-flops in the space of a few weeks. I can understand when commentators disagree with each other; it’s when they disagree with themselves we should worry.

Well, no, writers get sacked if they are wrong and the readers no long read them. Their words are on record. Bloggers can mull them over and then highlight failings. Take Labour’s  1997 manifesto pledge to hold a referendum on electoral reform; Labour’s pledge to half child poverty; to have an ethical foreign policy; and so on and on and on…



Posted: 6th, November 2008 | In: Politicians Comments (14) | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink