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Anorak | Boko Haram And The War On Nigeria’s Islamists: A Photo Essay

Boko Haram And The War On Nigeria’s Islamists: A Photo Essay

by | 24th, October 2014

ISLAMIST group Boko Harem are waging a bloody war for souls and heavenly rewards in Nigeria. Boko Harem want to turn Nigeria into an Islamic state in which any form of Western society (music, dance, shorts trousers, dresses, equal rights for women, respect of other religions, cartoons..) is banned on punishment of death.

They want Western-style education banned. They want Christianity routed.

So. Boko Harem have raided schools and kidnapped hundreds of girls.

The group’s official name is Jama’atu Ahlis Sunna Lidda’awati wal-Jihad, which in Arabic means “People Committed to the Propagation of the Prophet’s Teachings and Jihad”. Boko Harem is a nickname meaning “Western education is forbidden” in the Hausa language.

This is the story of a bloody war ofor Nigeria’s heart and soul:

 

 

In this photo taken Monday, Oct. 13, 2014, Cameroonians former hostages, meet with Cameroonian President, Paul Biya during a reception in Yaounde, Cameroon. Biya received former hostages, 10 Chinese and 17 Cameroonians, who were freed from captivity last week after spending some months held by armed men thought to belong to the militant rebel Islamist group Boko Haram in Nigeria which has been increasingly making incursions into Cameroon. (AP Photo/ Fabrice Ngon) An unidentified official displays burnt equipment inside a prison in Bauchi, Nigeria, Thursday, Sept. 9, 2010, after the radical Muslim Boko Haram sect armed with assault rifles launched an attack at sunset on Tuesday Sept. 7, on the prison to free more than 100 inmates who are followers of the sect. The highly organized and coordinated assault left the prison in ruins and has raised new fears of renewed violence in the oil-rich nation just months before scheduled elections, and shows they have access to sophisticated weaponry. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba) In a Sunday, Dec. 25, 2011 file photo, onlookers gather around a car destroyed in a blast next to St. Theresa Catholic Church in Madalla, Nigeria after an explosion ripped through a Catholic church during Christmas Mass near Nigeria's capital Sunday, killing scores of people, officials said. A radical Muslim sect, Boko Haram, claimed the attack and another bombing near a church in the restive city of Jos, as explosions also struck the nation's northeast. Boko Haram's insurgency started with robed men on motorcycles killing their enemies one at a time across Nigeria's remote and dusty northeast. Now the radical Muslim sect's attacks have morphed into a nationwide sectarian fight. (AP Photo/Sunday Aghaeze, File) Emir of Kano, Ado Bayaro, is seen at his palace in Kano, Nigeria, Monday, Jan. 23, 2012. The emir of Kano and the state's top politician offered prayers Monday for the more than 150 people who were killed in a coordinated series of attacks on Friday by the radical Islamist sect called Boko Haram which means "Western education is sacrilege" in the Hausa language of Nigeria's north.(AP Photo/Sunday Alamba) This image taken from a video posted by Boko Haram sympathisers shows the leader of the radical Islamist sect Imam Abubakar Shekau, made available Wednesday Jan. 10, 2012. The video of Imam Abubakar Shekau cements his leadership in the sect known as Boko Haram. Analysts and diplomats say the sect has fractured over time, with a splinter group responsible for the majority of the assassinations and bombings carried out in it's name. Women attend a demonstration calling on the government to rescue the kidnapped school girls of a government secondary school Chibok, outside the defense headquarters in Abuja, Nigeria, Tuesday May 6, 2014. Their plight — and the failure of the Nigerian military to find them — has drawn international attention to an escalating Islamic extremist insurrection that has killed more than 1,500 so far this year. Boko Haram, the name means "Western education is sinful," has claimed responsibility for the mass kidnapping and threatened to sell the girls. The claim was made in a video seen Monday. The British and U.S. governments have expressed concern over the fate of the missing students, and protests have erupted in major Nigerian cities and in New York. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)

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In this Monday April 21, 2014 file photo, four female students of the government secondary school Chibok, who were abducted by gunmen and reunited with their families, walk in Chibok, Nigeria. A civil society group says Wednesday April 30, 2014, that villagers are reporting that scores of girls and young women who were recently kidnapped from a school in Nigeria are being forced to marry Islamic extremists. A federal senator for the area in northeast Nigeria wants the government to get international help to rescue the more than 200 missing girls kidnapped by Boko Haram from a school two weeks ago. (AP Photo/ Haruna Umar, File)  this photo taken with an iPad on Friday, Jan. 31, 2013, women and children who survived attacks by Boko haram sits outside a compound at St. Paul's Roman Catholic Church, in Wada Chakawa, Yola, Nigeria. Before the usher could finish warning worshippers of the gunmen approaching, the attackers were storming into the church, locking the main door, exploding homemade bombs and firing into the congregation. The shooting continued as some people scrambled to escape out of windows and through the back door of the sacristy. Some had their throats slit in last Sunday's attack on St. Paul's Roman Catholic Church in Wada Chakawa village in northeast Nigeria. (AP Photo/ Ibrahim Abdulaziz) A man walks past a burnt out building following an attacked by Boko Haram in Bama, Nigeria, Thursday, Feb, 20. 2013. The latest attack by suspected Islamic extremists in Nigeria's northeast has left 115 people dead, more than 1,500 buildings razed and some 400 vehicles destroyed, witnesses said Thursday, as a traditional ruler accused the military of being scared to confront the militants. Sitting amid the smoking ruins of his palace, the shehu, or king, of Bama, Kyari Ibn Elkanemi, charged that the government "is not serious" about halting the Islamic uprising in a region covering one-sixth of the country, far from oil fields that make Nigeria Africa's biggest petroleum producer. (AP Photo/Jossy Ola) In this photo taken on Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, police and soldiers stand in front of a burnt out army barracks following an attack by Boko Haram in in Damaturu, Nigeria. Nigerian military and hospital reports indicate a 5-hour-long battle between Islamic extremists and troops in the capital of Nigeria’s Yobe state last Thursday and Friday killed at least 90 militants, 23 soldiers and eight police officers. (AP Photo) In this photo taken with an iPad empty shells use by Boko haram Islamists lie on the ground near an air force base in Maiduguri, Nigeria, Monday, Dec, 2. 2013. Hundreds of Islamic militants in trucks and a stolen armored personnel carrier attacked an air force base and international airport on the outskirts of a Nigerian city before dawn Monday, officials and witnesses said, possibly leaving scores of people dead in one of the insurgent group's most daring attacks. (AP Photo/Abdulkareem Haruna) Former French hostage Francis Collomp speaks to the media after a visit with French President Francois Hollande at the Elysee Palace in Paris, Friday, Nov. 22, 2013. Collomp escaped from his abductors in Zaria, in the northern Nigerian state of Kaduna, and went to the nearest police station, said Kaduna State Police Commissioner Olufemi Adenaike on Nov 17, 2013. Police identified no suspects, but the Boko Haram splinter group Ansaru had claimed responsibility for his kidnapping. (AP Photo/Francois Mori) Suspected Boko Haram sect members from left, Muhammed Nazeef Yunus, Umar Musa, Mustapha Yusuf, Ismaila Abdulazeez, and Ibrahim Isah, are paraded by Nigeria secret police, in Abuja, Nigeria, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013. Nigeria’s intelligence agency paraded five suspected Islamic extremists including a university lecturer accused of plotting terrorism. Yunus, 44, denied the charge and told reporters that instead his lectures are against the network accused of killing hundreds of mainly Muslim civilian victims in northeast Nigeria in recent weeks. The northeast has been under a state of emergency since May. (AP Photo/Olamikan Gbemiga) Suspected Boko Haram sect member Muhammed Nazeef Yunus, an assistant lecturer, reacts as he is paraded by Nigeria secret police, in Abuja, Nigeria, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013. Nigeria’s intelligence agency paraded five suspected Islamic extremists including a university lecturer accused of plotting terrorism. Yunus, 44, denied that and told reporters that instead his lectures are against the network accused of killing hundreds of mainly Muslim civilian victims in northeast Nigeria in recent weeks. The northeast has been under a state of emergency since May. (AP Photo/Olamikan Gbemiga) In this photo taken on Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, police and soldiers stand in front of a burnt out army barracks following an attack by Boko Haram in in Damaturu, Nigeria. Nigerian military and hospital reports indicate a 5-hour-long battle between Islamic extremists and troops in the capital of Nigeria’s Yobe state last Thursday and Friday killed at least 90 militants, 23 soldiers and eight police officers. (AP Photo) In this photo taken on Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, people inspect burnt weapons following an attack by Boko Haram in in Damaturu, Nigeria. Nigerian military and hospital reports indicate a 5-hour-long battle between Islamic extremists and troops in the capital of Nigeria’s Yobe state last Thursday and Friday killed at least 90 militants, 23 soldiers and eight police officers. (AP Photo) In this image taken with a mobile phone, rescue workers and family members gather to identify the bodies of students killed following an attack by Islamist extremist on an agricultural college in Gujba, Nigeria, Sunday, Sept. 29, 2013, Suspected Islamic extremists attacked the Yobe State College of Agriculture early Sunday, gunning down students as they slept in dormitories and torching classrooms, leaving some 50 students dead in the attack according to college Provost Molima Idi Mato. The attack is seen as part of an ongoing Islamic uprising in northeastern Nigeria prosecuted by Boko Haram militants in their declared quest to install an Islamic state. (AP Photo) n this image taken with a mobile phone, rescue workers and family members gather to identify the shrouded bodies of students killed following an attack by Islamist extremist on an agricultural college in Gujba, Nigeria, Sunday, Sept. 29, 2013, Suspected Islamic extremists attacked the Yobe State College of Agriculture early Sunday, gunning down students as they slept in dormitories and torching classrooms, leaving some 50 students dead in the attack according to college Provost Molima Idi Mato. The attack is seen as part of an ongoing Islamic uprising in northeastern Nigeria prosecuted by Boko Haram militants in their declared quest to install an Islamic state. (AP Photo) n this image taken with a mobile phone, rescue workers and family members gather to identify the

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Posted: 24th, October 2014 | In: In Pictures, News Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed: RSS 2.0 | TrackBack | Permalink