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The Consumer Category

We bring you the chic and unique, the best and most bizarre shopping offers both online and offline. We offer you tips on where to buy, and some of the less mainstream and crazy, individual and offbeat items on the internet. Anything that can be bought and sold can be featured here. And we love showcasing the best and worst art and design.

American Society of Parasitologists parasite playing cards

playing cards parasites

 

At the American Society of Parasitologists AGM, attendees are each given a set of parasite-themed playing cards into their conference goody bags.

 

The lucky attendees at this year's meeting of the American Societe of Parasitologists got a gorgeous deck of parasite-themed playing cards into their conference bags.  Don't worry: if these ever go into wide production, I'll definitely be posting about it here.

 

Spotter: April Mendis, BB

Posted: 27th, June 2015 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Can’t fight this eeling: greeting cards for fishy people

Blue Specs Sudio is selling these cards on a fishy theme:

fish cards 20

 

fish cards 2 fish cards 1 fish cards fish crds

Spotter: I sea what you did there.

 

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Posted: 24th, June 2015 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Fun with child death and lice with these 10 Plagues Seder Night masks

It’s Seder Night, when Jews recall Passover and the plagues sent down on the house of Egypt to help along their emancipation from slavery. As dad reads out the story, the cool kids can play along by wearing one of 10 masks, each one representing a plague. “Bagsy, Death to the ‘First Born’,” says Junior, the rascal. Others can enjoy ‘Blood’, ‘Boils’, ‘Lice’ and ‘Darkness’.

The whole set is yours for a mere $14.99 at Bed Bath and Beyond.

But be warned: these mask are only suitable for over 3s lest there be a new plague of ‘Choking’.

 

seder night masks

 

 

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Posted: 23rd, June 2015 | In: Key Posts, News, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Trigger Warning: free speech is being attacked and downgraded in Anglo-American culture, says Mick Hume

Trigger Warning sm

 

Anorak asked journalist Mick Hume about his new book, which looks at the highly topical issue of free speech…

 

Your new book is entitled ‘Trigger Warning’. For those not familiar with the phrase, could you explain its origin and its relevance?

A ‘trigger warning’ is a statement stuck at the beginning of a piece of writing, video or whatever to alert you to the fact that it contains material you may find upsetting or offensive. For example, ‘TW: Islamophobic language’, or ‘TW: references to sexual violence’.

Trigger Warnings took off in US colleges (where student activists want classic works to carry them, suggesting for example that The Great Gatsby should have one along the lines of ‘TW: suicide, domestic abuse and graphic violence’). They have since spread across the Atlantic and the internet. If you are not familiar with ‘TWs’, they are coming soon to a website near you.

For me the mission creep of trigger warnings symbolises the stultifying atmosphere surrounding freedom of expression and debate today. They are like those ‘Here be dragons’ signs on uncharted areas of old maps, warning students and others not to take a risk, not to step off the edge of their comfort zone, not to expose themselves to ‘uncomfortable’ ideas, images or opinions.

 

What is the book about?

The sub-title of the book rather gives the game away: ‘Is the fear of being offensive killing free speech?’ To which its unsurprising answer is yes, unless we do something about it.

Trigger Warning is about all the various ways in which free speech is being attacked and downgraded in Anglo-American culture today. It describes ‘the silent war on free speech’. It’s a silent war because nobody in politics or public life admits that they are against freedom of expression; all of them will make ritualistic displays of support for it ‘in principle’, as they did after the Charlie Hebdo massacre. In practice, however, they are all seeking ways to restrict freedom of expression, whilst insisting that ‘this is not a free speech issue’, it is merely an attempt to protect the ‘vulnerable’ against offensive and hateful words.

To that end, the book examines the complementary trends towards official censorship, unofficial censorship and self-censorship in the West today, covering everything from online ‘trolls’ to football and comedy as well as more conventional political issues.

Of these three, the most insidious is the informal, unofficial censorship promoted by Twitter mobs and assorted boycott-and-ban-happy zealots. They are a relatively small minority, but they exercise disproportionate influence by preying on the loss of faith in free speech at the top of our societies.

I describe these people as ‘reverse-Voltaires’, who have taken the famous principle linked to Voltaire – ‘I may hate what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it’ – and twisted it into its opposite – ‘I know I will detest what you say, and I will defend to the end of free speech my right to stop you saying it’. They do not want to debate arguments they disagree with, but merely to close them down as offensive. Trigger Warning takes on their most powerful excuses in a section entitled ‘Five good reasons for restricting free speech – and why they’re all wrong’.

 

What is the main message of the book?

The main message of the book – and I fear it is a ‘message’ book, or ‘polemic’ as we pretentious authors say – is twofold, I suppose. That we have forgotten how important the fight for free speech has been in the creation of something approximating a civilised society, and that we are in danger of giving it up without a struggle. It is not so much that we are losing the free speech wars: we are not even fighting them!

Few of the great advances in politics, science and culture over the past 500 years would have been possible without the expansion of free speech and the willingness of heroic heretics to question everything and break taboos. None of the liberation movements of the recent past could have succeeded without putting the right to free speech at the forefront of their campaigns (which makes it all the more bitterly ironic to see restrictions on free speech being demanded today in the name of protecting the oppressed).

Free speech was never a right to be won once and then put on a shelf to be admired. It always has to be defended again, against new challenges and enemies. The big danger today is that so few are standing up for unfettered free speech against the reverse-Voltaires and their like. Where are the young Tom Paines, JS Mills, John Wilkes’ or George Orwells of our age? Instead we have characters like the US liberal professor who just wrote a (pseudonymous) article about how he is too ‘terrified’ of his ‘liberal’ students to raise a potentially offensive idea or even ask them to read Mark Twain. Time to take a stand before it’s too late.

 

You have been outspoken about the right to offend. But some people seem to believe they have a duty to offend, and we have seen public examples of this recently. How does your opinion differ from theirs?

I have been writing about the right to be offensive for some 25 years, since the crisis over Salman Rushdie’s The Satanic Verses. It is the cutting edge of free speech. After all, what use is it is we are only ‘free’ to say what everybody else might like? If we defend free speech for those views branded extreme and offensive, the mainstream will look after itself. This is not about offensive language, but opinions – as JS Mill pointed out long ago, the more powerful your opponent’s arguments are, the more offensive you tend to find them!

The importance of that issue was brought into sharp focus by the reaction to the Charlie Hebdo massacre of course. As the book describes, behind the apparent displays of Je Suis Charlie solidarity, the powerful message was that those cartoonists had gone ‘too far’ in offending Islam. Those gunmen might have been inspired by Islamist preachers, but they can only have been encouraged by the loss of faith in free speech at the heart of Western culture.

None of this means, as you mention, that anybody has a duty to offend. The right to be offensive is not an obligation. One problem today is that the response to the conformist culture of You-Can’t-Say-That tends to be a few comedians and others trying to cause offence for the sake of it. That’s infantile and useless. As William Hazlitt wrote, ‘An honest man speaks the truth, though it may cause offence, a vain man, in order that it may”. A good distinction, so long as we remember that the vain man gets the freedom to speak his version of the truth, too.

Trigger Warning: Is the Fear of Being Offensive Killing Free Speech? is published by Collins.

Mick was answering questions put to him by Ed Barrett

Posted: 17th, June 2015 | In: Books, Key Posts, News | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The cowboy sandal is impetigo for your feet

The Cowboy Sandal is the work of Scotty Franklin of Springfield, Missouri. For $50– yeah, you pay him! – Scotty will distract attention from your terrible hair, chronic impetigo and that carbuncle on your forehead by getting everyone to stare at your feet.

 

cowboy sandal

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Posted: 15th, June 2015 | In: Fashion, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Bud And Breakfast: Colorado opens holiday park for stoners who like to be organised

cannacamp

 

Stoners can now hang out together in a cannabis-themed holiday park in Colorado. It sounds as awful as any place where enthusiasts meet.

CannaCamp is a 170-acre slice of heaven, where recreational marijuana and our Colorado mountain resort combine to create an unprecedented opportunity for cannabis users to experience the outdoors in a safe, comfortable, and social environment. Our all-inclusive rates include luxurious accommodations in one of our nine well-appointed cabins, decadent dining throughout the day, beautiful surroundings in the heart of nature, and an incredible wealth of free activities that highlight adventure, wellness, and cannabis.

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Posted: 11th, June 2015 | In: marijuana, News, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Porn stars Tori Black and Joy van Velsen are the flavours of a new whisky (NSFW photos)

Finally, a whisky that will allow you to “experience the perfect combination of premium quality whisky and the most coveted women,” runs the blurb for WhiskyX. “Not only will the quality of our whisky make your heart beat faster, the thought of the same whisky touching the body of the woman of your dreams will leave you speechless.” This whisky is filtered over gold and diamonds. It is then “blended” over the bodies of adult movie stars Tori Black and Joy van Velsen. The photo features Black pouring over her chest, offering further branding opportunities for its use as a bodywash or antispetic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted: 10th, June 2015 | In: Celebrities, News, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Upset mother dresses cat in daughter’s nipple-revealing crop top

nipple top cat

 

Anyone buying a $3 knit crop top from Amzaon whousl know that it shows your nipples and, as one mother says, “Do not buy this, even for your cat.”

 

nipple top cat

 

 

Psychoanalyse that.

Posted: 10th, June 2015 | In: Fashion, News, Strange But True | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Connecticut teacher fired for reading Allen Ginsberg poem students can borrow from the school library

3rd July 1973:  American poet Allen Ginsberg (1926 - 1997) with Anglo-American poet and playwright W H Auden (1907 - 1973).  (Photo by Evening Standard/Getty Images)

3rd July 1973: American poet Allen Ginsberg (1926 – 1997) with Anglo-American poet and playwright W H Auden (1907 – 1973). (Photo by Evening Standard/Getty Images) Auden wrote ‘The Platonic Blow‘.

 

Censorshsip is on the rise in the US. The ‘you can’t say that’ culture is undermining free speech and free thinking. National Coalition Against Censorship has news: “During an AP class discussion about gratuitous language, a student asked a teacher to read an Allen Ginsberg poem. He did. He’s not a teacher anymore.”

David Olio was sacked for reading a poem? Really?

In February two students complained about an Allen Ginsberg poem that, at the request of a fellow student, was shared in Olio’s AP English class at South Windsor High School in Connecticut. A media uproar followed, and Olio was essentially forced to resign.

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Posted: 7th, June 2015 | In: Books, News | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


The telescopic contact lens let’s you zoom in and out in a wink

'Eye of a Young Woman'. Artist: Joseph Sacco

 

The Google Glass was the wasabi enema of cool. But what if you had the functionality without the form? Robert J. Szczerba at Forbes:

For those of us old enough to remember television in the ‘70s the epitome of cool was the Six Million Dollar Man, Col. Steve Austin and his bionic enhancements.  But what was once the purview of science fiction is inching closer to becoming an everyday reality, as optics specialist Eric Tremblay unveiled a unique contact lens that provides the user with telescopic vision.  The lens was revealed earlier this year at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in San Jose, California.

The new contact lens, a more advanced model of a prototype introduced in 2013, is 1.55 millimeters thick and features a very thin, reflective telescope, which allows the user to zoom in and out in literally a wink. The telescopic contacts are made with a rigid lens known as a scleral lens— larger in diameter than the more familiar soft contacts, but useful for special cases, such as for people with irregularly shaped corneas. Despite their size and stiffness, scleral lenses are safe and comfortable for special applications, and are an attractive platform for technologies such as optics, sensors, and electronics.

Lord Nelson would have loved it.

Posted: 5th, June 2015 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Chocobana-na: you can inject your cream into a banana (video)

Chocobanana

Chocobanana

 

Stuck for a way to inject chocolate sauce or cream into a ripe banana? Well, worry no more. The Chocobana-na is here to turn the phallic fruit into a loaded missile.

 

 

Posted: 1st, June 2015 | In: Strange But True, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


How one writer tricked the Daily Mail into reporting ‘chocolate can Help you lose weight’

John Bohannon chocolate fake

 

 

The Daily Mail told us that choloclate can help you lose weight.

John Bohannon writes:

“Slim by Chocolate!” the headlines blared. A team of German researchers had found that people on a low-carb diet lost weight 10 percent faster if they ate a chocolate bar every day. It made the front page of Bild, Europe’s largest daily newspaper, just beneath their update about the Germanwings crash. From there, it ricocheted around the internet and beyond… The Bild story quotes the study’s lead author, Johannes Bohannon, Ph.D., research director of the Institute of Diet and Health: “The best part is you can buy chocolate everywhere.”

I am Johannes Bohannon, Ph.D. Well, actually my name is John, and I’m a journalist. I do have a Ph.D., but it’s in the molecular biology of bacteria, not humans. The Institute of Diet and Health? That’s nothing more than a website.

Other than those fibs, the study was 100 percent authentic. My colleagues and I recruited actual human subjects in Germany. We ran an actual clinical trial, with subjects randomly assigned to different diet regimes. And the statistically significant benefits of chocolate that we reported are based on the actual data. It was, in fact, a fairly typical study for the field of diet research. Which is to say: It was terrible science. The results are meaningless, and the health claims that the media blasted out to millions of people around the world are utterly unfounded.

Read on…

 

Posted: 28th, May 2015 | In: News, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Painted bronze sculpture of Sir Tim Berners-Lee unveiled at the National Portrait Gallery

Sean Henry, berners lee statue

 

The National Portrait Gallery has unveiled Sean Henry’s painted bronze sculpture of Sir Tim Berners-Lee.

His lap-top’s in the leather bag slung over his shoulder.

Posted: 28th, May 2015 | In: Technology, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


1947: Dectorate your children’s room with Disney-themed DDT-impregnated wallpaper

ddt

 

In 1947, Trimz made ready-pasted wallpaper for children. “Actual tests have proved that one fly can carry as many as 6,600,000 bacteria!” But with DDT the fly is dead. The bacteria are dead. And you child is being slowly poisoned.

Posted: 24th, May 2015 | In: Strange But True, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


London gets ready to cook at the Breaking Bad bar

 

Breaking Bad bar London

 

London is getting bar ABQ, a venue set in a large RV named after the setting of the TV show Breaking Bad in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

For £30, 22 punters-a-time will not get to sample the blue meth, but”cook” two drinks.

Anyone unable to afford £15 drinks can pop along to Danny’s Burger RV (formerly Danny’s Burger Van) on the M62 betweeen 2am and 5am every weekday, where so long as you’ve got the cash, Danny’s pretty much got anything you want.

 

 

Posted: 22nd, May 2015 | In: News, The Consumer, TV & Radio | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


London property madness: former Chelsea council flat on sale for £1.1m

keppel house

 

A third floor flat in unlovely Keppel House on Brompton Cross, Chelsea, is on sale for £1.5m

Maskells estate agency says the redesigned property features two-bedrooms, a 1952 Soviet-styled exterior, “handcrafted and laid chevron flooring”, “mood lighting and bespoke fixtures”.

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Posted: 20th, May 2015 | In: The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Former Thompson Twins singer Alannah Currie stuffs her furniture with roadkill

Alannah Currie furniture

 

Alannah Currie, once of the three-piece 1980s band The Thompson Twins, now works as an upholsterer.

She says she has hidden poetry and handwritten stories in different parts” of her chairs. And then there is her use of marterials, which is interesting:

The foxes, swan, lamb and blue tit on my chairs are memento mori. I’m a vegetarian, so I did a lot of research to find the right taxidermist who uses animals that die naturally or are roadkill. I had to wait eight months for the swan. As far as fitting the animals into the chairs, I’m very specific. For instance, for the foxes, I measured the back of the chair, drew exactly how I wanted the foxes to be positioned and sent these drawings to the taxidermist. Then I sewed them in when they eventually arrived. All the furniture is made to be robust. It is functional art – there may be a lamb on the chair, but you can lie beside it or use it as a cushion. To me, they are very beautiful but disturbing at the same time.

 

swan dead

 

You can see more of her work at Miss Pokeno.

 

 

Posted: 19th, May 2015 | In: Celebrities, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0


Photos of the Star Trek flat for sale after owner was jailed for sex crimes

Star Trek flat

 

Will you go boldy into the Star Trek flat in Hinckley, Leicestershire.

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Posted: 17th, May 2015 | In: Strange But True, The Consumer | Comment | Follow the Comments on our RSS feed:RSS 2.0